Archive for August 18th, 2012

Page 1 of 212

Biosense Webster’s New CARTO 3 MEM Multi-Electrode Mapping System

Biosense Webster’s New CARTO 3 MEM Multi-Electrode Mapping System

Biosense Webster’s New CARTO 3 MEM Multi-Electrode Mapping System

DIAMOND BAR, Calif., Aug 13, 2012 (BUSINESS WIRE) — Biosense Webster, Inc., a worldwide leader in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, announced the launch of the new CARTO(R) 3 MEM (Multi-Electrode Mapping) Version in the United States.

NEW Multi-Electrode Mapping Technology

The CARTO(R) 3 MEM Version is the latest advancement on the CARTO(R) 3 System platform. Based on market-leading electromagnetic technology, the new CARTO(R) 3 MEM Version provides a fast method for mapping and diagnosing arrhythmias, while using sensor-based MEM-enabled catheters to maintain a high degree of anatomical accuracy. The new PENTARAY(R) Nav Catheter is equipped with the electromagnetic sensor, allowing for accurate visualization of electrode position on the CARTO(R) 3 System and higher resolution signals.

“Multi-electrode mapping represents a significant advancement in mapping technology, allowing physicians to acquire multiple mapping points simultaneously with a high level of detail and CARTO(R) 3 System accuracy,” said Dr. Vivek Reddy, Mount Sinai School of Medicine. “Combined with the new PENTARAY(R) Nav Catheter, you can reduce the number of required catheter maneuvers to quickly diagnose any arrhythmia. This further supports the safety, effectiveness and efficiency of cardiac ablation procedures for patients.”

About AF and cardiac ablation

Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent arrhythmia, and is a leading cause of stroke among people 65 years and older. Worldwide, it is estimated that 20 million people have AF, yet only ~130,000 are treated with ablation every year. The public health implications of AF are a growing concern because those with AF are at an increased risk of morbidity and mortality as well as a reduced quality of life. Today, most patients with AF are treated with anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs), even though about half of them are refractory to these drugs.

Cardiac Ablation offers a safe and efficacious alternative to treat cardiac arrhythmias. During cardiac ablation, energy is delivered through the catheter to those areas of the heart muscle causing the abnormal heart rhythm. This energy “disconnects” the pathway of the abnormal rhythm. Cardiac ablation is commonly used for “simple” arrhythmias, like Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and atrioventricular nodal re-entry tachycardia (AVNRT), and is increasingly being used for more complex arrhythmias like ventricular tachycardia and atrial fibrillation. THERMOCOOL(R)Navigation Catheters are approved for drug refractory recurrent symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, when used with CARTO(R) Systems (excluding the NAVISTAR(R) RMT THERMOCOOL(R) Catheter).

Dr. Reddy is compensated for his services as a member of the company’s scientific advisory board and provides other consulting services.

About Biosense Webster, Inc.

Biosense Webster, Inc., a Johnson & Johnson company, pioneered EP diagnostic catheters more than 20 years ago and continues to lead the industry as an innovative provider of advanced cardiac diagnostic, therapeutic, and mapping tools. As the leader in EP navigation systems and ablation therapy, Biosense Webster, Inc. has technology that includes the largest installed base of cardiac mapping navigation systems worldwide in leading hospitals and teaching institutions. For more information about Biosense Webster and its products, please visit: www.biosensewebster.com (this site is intended for US visitors only).

The CARTO 3 System is the next generation 3D mapping system from Biosense Webster. Building on the accuracy of CARTO System magnetic navigation technology, the CARTO 3 System provides electrophysiologists with three key capabilities.

The CARTO 3 System is the next generation 3D mapping system from Biosense Webster. Building on the accuracy of CARTO System magnetic navigation technology, the CARTO 3 System provides electrophysiologists with three key capabilities.

Source : http://www.biosensewebster.com/products/navigation/carto3.aspx

Full story

Therapik Bug Bite Therapy Device Actually Works

Therapik Bug Bite Therapy Device Actually Works

Therapik Bug Bite Therapy Device Actually Works

Are you being eaten alive by mosquitos? Is the itch driving you completely and utterly insane? Us too! So when we heard about this magic wand that supposedly takes the itch away, we had to call it in to make fun of it.

We, uh… we were wrong.

What Is It?

It’s a small handheld wand you use to zap bites to make them stop itching.

Who’s It For?

People who encounter mosquitoes, bees, wasps, hornets, black flies, ants, fleas, ticks,

chiggers and even jellyfish and stinging nettle. Not for use with snake or spider bites, sadly.

Design

It looks like a 1960s sci-fi prop. It’s a thick remote control with a big, round button. You look at it and instantly think, “There is no way in hell this cheap piece of crap is going to work.”

Using It

You put the tip of the Therapik onto your bug bite, then you press and hold down the button. The tip uses light to heat the bite up. You hold it there for as long as you can take it, up to a minute. The burning sensation gets pretty intense after 30 seconds or so.

The Best Part

It actually works! Mosquito bites (the only thing we tested it with) stopped itching within a few seconds of taking it off, and in most cases they never itched again. We are officially stunned.

Tragic Flaw

It looks so crappy and bad that most people will dismiss it before ever trying it.

This Is Weird…

Still completely amazed that this works. Like, seriously? Look at it!

Test Notes

This thing is actually confirmed by the FDA to deliver bug bite relief.

It’s powered by a single 9V battery and has lasted close to a hundred applications so far.

It works on the principle that most insect venom is thermolabile (sensitive to heat). Therapik claims to deliver “heat in the precise temperature range necessary to deactivate the venom from over 20,000 different species of insects and sea creatures.”

It helps to reduce the bite’s swelling, as well.

It’s light, but it’s just a bit too bulky to be considered “pocket-sized.” It will however fit in a small backpack pocket, so it would still be great for camping.

If one application doesn’t do it, you can reapply as often as you want.

Therapik’s website certainly doesn’t help the “there’s no way this isn’t BS” factor.

If your bites are under your socks, they will chafe when you walk and start itching again.

Should You Buy It?

Unbelievably, yes, totally. This thing, despite being ugly and bulky, is great. At first we thought it was just psychosomatic, but after a few weeks of testing, we believe it to be legit. Even if you doubt us (and we don’t blame you, because, come on, right?) it’ll only cost you thirteen bucks to find out for yourself. [Therapik]

Are you being eaten alive by mosquitos? Is the itch driving you completely and utterly insane? Us too! So when we heard about this magic wand that supposedly takes the itch away, we had to call it in to make fun of it.

We, uh… we were wrong.

What Is It?

It’s a small handheld wand you use to zap bites to make them stop itching.

Who’s It For?

People who encounter mosquitoes, bees, wasps, hornets, black flies, ants, fleas, ticks,

chiggers and even jellyfish and stinging nettle. Not for use with snake or spider bites, sadly.

Design

It looks like a 1960s sci-fi prop. It’s a thick remote control with a big, round button. You look at it and instantly think, “There is no way in hell this cheap piece of crap is going to work.”

Using It

You put the tip of the Therapik onto your bug bite, then you press and hold down the button. The tip uses light to heat the bite up. You hold it there for as long as you can take it, up to a minute. The burning sensation gets pretty intense after 30 seconds or so.

The Best Part

It actually works! Mosquito bites (the only thing we tested it with) stopped itching within a few seconds of taking it off, and in most cases they never itched again. We are officially stunned.

Tragic Flaw

It looks so crappy and bad that most people will dismiss it before ever trying it.

This Is Weird…

Still completely amazed that this works. Like, seriously? Look at it!

Test Notes

This thing is actually confirmed by the FDA to deliver bug bite relief.

It’s powered by a single 9V battery and has lasted close to a hundred applications so far.

It works on the principle that most insect venom is thermolabile (sensitive to heat). Therapik claims to deliver “heat in the precise temperature range necessary to deactivate the venom from over 20,000 different species of insects and sea creatures.”

It helps to reduce the bite’s swelling, as well.

It’s light, but it’s just a bit too bulky to be considered “pocket-sized.” It will however fit in a small backpack pocket, so it would still be great for camping.

If one application doesn’t do it, you can reapply as often as you want.

Therapik’s website certainly doesn’t help the “there’s no way this isn’t BS” factor.

If your bites are under your socks, they will chafe when you walk and start itching again.

Should You Buy It?

Unbelievably, yes, totally. This thing, despite being ugly and bulky, is great. At first we thought it was just psychosomatic, but after a few weeks of testing, we believe it to be legit. Even if you doubt us (and we don’t blame you, because, come on, right?) it’ll only cost you thirteen bucks to find out for yourself. [Therapik]

Source : http://gizmodo.com/5935350/therapik-bug-bite-relieving-gadget-review-we-cant-believe-this-actually-works

Full story

Masers, Forgotten Cousins of Lasers, Come Out of The Cold

Masers, Forgotten Cousins of Lasers, Come Out of The Cold

Masers, Forgotten Cousins of Lasers, Come Out of The Cold

Scientists from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and Imperial College London demonstrate, for the first time, a solid-state ‘MASER’ capable of operating at room temperature, paving the way for its widespread adoption – as reported in the journal Nature.

MASER stands for Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Devices based on this process and known by the same acronym were developed by scientists more than 50 years ago, before the first LASERs were invented. Instead of creating intense beams of light, as in the case of LASERs, MASERs deliver a concentrated beam of microwaves.

Conventional MASER technology works by amplifying microwaves using crystals such as ruby – this process is known as ‘masing’. However, the MASER has had little technological impact compared to the LASER because getting it to work has always required extreme conditions that are difficult to produce; either extremely low pressures, supplied by special vacuum chambers and pumps, or freezing conditions at temperatures close to absolute zero (-273.15 °C), supplied by special refrigerators. To make matters worse, the application of strong magnetic fields has often also been necessary, requiring large magnets.

Now, the team from NPL and Imperial have demonstrated masing in a solid-state device working in air at room temperature with no applied magnetic field. This breakthrough means that the cost to manufacture and operate MASERs could be dramatically reduced, which could lead to them becoming as widely used as LASER technology.

The researchers suggest that room-temperature MASERs could be used to make more sensitive medical instruments for scanning patients, improved chemical sensors for remotely detecting explosives; lower-noise read-out mechanisms for quantum computers and better radio telescopes for potentially detecting life on other planets.

Dr Mark Oxborrow, co-author of the study at NPL, says:

“For half a century the MASER has been the forgotten, inconvenient cousin of the LASER. Our design breakthrough will enable MASERs to be used by industry and consumers.”

Professor Neil Alford, co-author and Head of the Department of Materials at Imperial College London, adds:

“When LASERs were invented no one quite knew exactly how they would be used and yet, the technology flourished to the point that LASERs have now become ubiquitous in our everyday lives. We’ve still got a long way to go before the MASER reaches that level, but our breakthrough does mean that this technology can literally come out of the cold and start becoming more useful.”

Conventional MASER technology works by amplifying microwaves using hard inorganic crystals such as ruby. However, masing only works when the ruby is kept at a very low temperature. The team in this new study have discovered that a completely different type of crystal, namely p-terphenyl doped with pentacene, can replace ruby and replicate the same masing process at room temperature. As a curious twist, the pentacene dopant turns the otherwise colourless p-terphenyl crystal an intense reddish pink – making it look just like ruby!

Our design breakthrough will enable MASERs to be used by industry and consumers

Dr Mark Oxborrow, co-author of the study

The twin challenges the team currently face are getting the MASER to work continuously, as their first device only works in pulsed mode for fractions of a second at a time. They also aim to get it to operate over a range of microwave frequencies, instead of its current narrow bandwidth, which would make the technology more useful.

In the long term, the team have a range of other goals including the identification of different materials that can mase at room temperature while consuming less power than pentacene-doped p-terphenyl. They will also focus on creating new designs that could make the MASER smaller and more portable.

The research was funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and, at NPL, through the UK’s National Measurement Office.

The full paper, ‘Room-temperature solid-state maser’, was published in Nature on 16 August 2012.

Dr Mark Oxborrow introduces the paper and discusses the maser in the following video.

NPL’s Quantum Detection Group has also recently had research published in Nature Nanotechnology and Nature Communications.

The invention of the laser has resulted in many innovations, and the device has become ubiquitous. However, the maser, which amplifies microwave radiation rather than visible light, has not had as large an impact, despite being instrumental in the laser’s birth1, 2. The maser’s relative obscurity has mainly been due to the inconvenience of the operating conditions needed for its various realizations: atomic3 and free-electron4 masers require vacuum chambers and pumping; and solid-state masers5, although they excel as low-noise amplifiers6 and are occasionally incorporated in ultrastable oscillators7, 8, typically require cryogenic refrigeration. Most realizations of masers also require strong magnets, magnetic shielding or both. Overcoming these various obstacles would pave the way for improvements such as more-sensitive chemical assays, more-precise determinations of biomolecular structure and function, and more-accurate medical diagnostics (including tomography) based on enhanced magnetic resonance spectrometers9 incorporating maser amplifiers and oscillators. Here we report the experimental demonstration of a solid-state maser operating at room temperature in pulsed mode. It works on a laboratory bench, in air, in the terrestrial magnetic field and amplifies at around 1.45 gigahertz. In contrast to the cryogenic ruby maser6, in our maser the gain medium is an organic mixed molecular crystal, p-terphenyl doped with pentacene, the latter being photo-excited by yellow light. The maser’s pumping mechanism exploits spin-selective molecular intersystem crossing10 into pentacene’s triplet ground state11, 12. When configured as an oscillator, the solid-state maser’s measured output power of around -10 decibel milliwatts is approximately 100 million times greater than that of an atomic hydrogen maser3, which oscillates at a similar frequency (about 1.42 gigahertz). By exploiting the high levels of spin polarization readily generated by intersystem crossing in photo-excited pentacene and other aromatic molecules, this new type of maser seems to be capable of amplifying with a residual noise temperature far below room temperature.

The invention of the laser has resulted in many innovations, and the device has become ubiquitous. However, the maser, which amplifies microwave radiation rather than visible light, has not had as large an impact, despite being instrumental in the laser’s birth1, 2. The maser’s relative obscurity has mainly been due to the inconvenience of the operating conditions needed for its various realizations: atomic3 and free-electron4 masers require vacuum chambers and pumping; and solid-state masers5, although they excel as low-noise amplifiers6 and are occasionally incorporated in ultrastable oscillators7, 8, typically require cryogenic refrigeration. Most realizations of masers also require strong magnets, magnetic shielding or both. Overcoming these various obstacles would pave the way for improvements such as more-sensitive chemical assays, more-precise determinations of biomolecular structure and function, and more-accurate medical diagnostics (including tomography) based on enhanced magnetic resonance spectrometers9 incorporating maser amplifiers and oscillators. Here we report the experimental demonstration of a solid-state maser operating at room temperature in pulsed mode. It works on a laboratory bench, in air, in the terrestrial magnetic field and amplifies at around 1.45 gigahertz. In contrast to the cryogenic ruby maser6, in our maser the gain medium is an organic mixed molecular crystal, p-terphenyl doped with pentacene, the latter being photo-excited by yellow light. The maser’s pumping mechanism exploits spin-selective molecular intersystem crossing10 into pentacene’s triplet ground state11, 12. When configured as an oscillator, the solid-state maser’s measured output power of around -10 decibel milliwatts is approximately 100 million times greater than that of an atomic hydrogen maser3, which oscillates at a similar frequency (about 1.42 gigahertz). By exploiting the high levels of spin polarization readily generated by intersystem crossing in photo-excited pentacene and other aromatic molecules, this new type of maser seems to be capable of amplifying with a residual noise temperature far below room temperature.

Source : http://www.npl.co.uk/news/maser-power-comes-out-of-the-cold

Full story

Philosys Gmate SMART Glucose Meter for Smartphones

Philosys Gmate SMART Glucose Meter for Smartphones

Philosys Gmate SMART Glucose Meter for Smartphones

NEW YORK, Aug. 13, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Philosys announced today that it has received the CE Mark for the Gmate® SMART Blood Glucose Monitoring System. According to Jonathan Johnson, Director of Regulatory Affairs, “CE designation will allow Philosys to market the Gmate® SMART within the European Union,(EU), consisting of the 27 EU Member States. Moreover, the CE mark signifies that the product has been assessed before being placed on the market and meets European Union safety, health and environmental protection requirements.” Gmate® SMART is the first of its kind blood glucose monitor to work with the iPhone, iPad and iPod devices. The CE Mark approval is an important milestone for Philosys in offering innovative technology to diabetics around the globe. Planning for the European market has been underway for more than a year and diabetic patients in the EU should be able to begin using the Gmate® SMART before the end of 2012.

“With the launch of the Gmate® SMART in Europe, Philosys provides the perfect solution to diabetics looking for new technology to help monitor blood glucose levels in an active, fast paced lifestyle,” said Jennifer Kupar, Manager of Operations at Philosys. “As smart phone usage continues to increase in Europe, there is a growing demand for this breakthrough patent-pending technology that Philosys can deliver,” Kupar continued.

As a next step, Philosys is pursuing global telecommunications contracts for the Gmate® SMART. Philosys is seeking to partner with major cell phone providers in a variety of markets to provide innovative health solutions to diabetic patients and health systems.

About Gmate

The Gmate® SMART is the smallest, most innovative glucose meter in the world. The patent pending technology of the Gmate® SMART uses the operating system of the smart phone and works by plugging the device into the headphone connector of the smart phone, and launching the companion app.

For more information please visit www.gmate.com or contact Jennifer Kupar at jkupar@gmate.com

PR Newswire (http://s.tt/1kJjP)

Philosys, a company based in New York City, received European CE Mark approval for its Gmate SMART glucose meter, an iPhone/iPad attachment that is the world’s smallest glucometer. The meter uses the iOS device via the headset jack as the interface to display results and track readings. It would seem that the same glucometer should also be compatible with other smartphones as long as an appropriate app is developed.

Philosys is currently looking to partner with cell phone firms to help distribute the Gmate SMART and hopes to have it’s device available to European customers by the end of the year.

Source : http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/

www.philosys-awarded-ce-mark-for-new-gmate-smart-meter-and-seeks-global-telecommunications-partners-166026416.html?utm_expid=43414375-18&utm_referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fmedgadget.com%2F2012%2F08%2Fphilosys-gmate-smart-glucose-meter-for-smartphones.html

Full story

An Update On NeuroVigil’s iBrain Device

An Update On NeuroVigil’s iBrain Device

An Update On NeuroVigil’s iBrain Device

SAN DIEGO — Already surrounded by machines that allow him, painstakingly, to communicate, the physicist Stephen Hawking last summer donned what looked like a rakish black headband that held a feather-light device the size of a small matchbox.

Called the iBrain, this simple-looking contraption is part of an experiment that aims to allow Dr. Hawking — long paralyzed by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease — to communicate by merely thinking.

The iBrain is part of a new generation of portable neural devices and algorithms intended to monitor and diagnose conditions like sleep apnea, depression and autism. Invented by a team led by Philip Low, a 32-year-old neuroscientist who is chief executive of NeuroVigil, a company based in San Diego, the iBrain is gaining attention as a possible alternative to expensive sleep labs that use rubber and plastic caps riddled with dozens of electrodes and usually require a patient to stay overnight.

“The iBrain can collect data in real time in a person’s own bed, or when they’re watching TV, or doing just about anything,” Dr. Low said.

The device uses a single channel to pick up waves of electrical brain signals, which change with different activities and thoughts, or with the pathologies that accompany brain disorders.

But the raw waves are hard to read because they must pass through the many folds of the brain and then the skull, so they are interpreted with an algorithm that Dr. Low first created for his Ph.D., earned in 2007 at the University of California, San Diego. (The original research, published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was done on zebra finches.)

About the Hawking experiment, he said, “The idea is to see if Stephen can use his mind to create a consistent and repeatable pattern that a computer can translate into, say, a word or letter or a command for a computer.”

The researchers traveled to Dr. Hawking’s offices in Cambridge, England, fitted him with the iBrain headband and asked him “to imagine that he was scrunching his right hand into a ball,” Dr. Low said. “Of course, he can’t actually move his hand, but the motor cortex in his brain can still issue the command and generate electrical waves in his brain.”

The algorithm, called Spears, was able to discern Dr. Hawking’s thoughts as signals, which were represented as a series of spikes on a grid.

“We wanted to see if there was any change in the signal,” Dr. Low said. “And in fact, we did see a change in the signal.” NeuroVigil plans to repeat the study in large populations of patients with A.L.S. and other neurodegenerative diseases.

These preliminary results come as Dr. Hawking’s ability to communicate diminishes as his disease progresses. The 70-year-old physicist, whose mind has produced crucial insights in theoretical physics as well as the best-seller “A Brief History of Time,” now needs several minutes to generate a simple message. He uses a pair of infrared glasses that picks up twitches in his cheek. His team in Cambridge, England, has dubbed this the “cheek switch.”

“Dr. Low and his company have done some outstanding work in this field,” Dr. Hawking said in a statement. “I am participating in this project in the hope that I can offer insights and practical advice to NeuroVigil. I wish to assist in research, encourage investment in this area, and, most importantly, to offer some future hope to people diagnosed with A.L.S. and other neurodegenerative conditions.”

The physicist has also worked with other inventors seeking to better elucidate his thoughts. Engineers at the semiconductor and computing giant Intel recently hooked up a customized computer to communicate with his cheek-reading infrared glasses, along with a voice synthesizer, a webcam for using Skype, and special monitors. Intel is developing new face-recognition software that can monitor subtle changes in expression and may help Dr. Hawking communicate more efficiently.

Scientists not connected with Dr. Low say they are encouraged by the iBrain’s potential. “Philip Low’s device is one of the best single-channel brain monitors out there,” said Ruth O’Hara, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University Medical School. She plans to use the iBrain for autism studies. NeuroVigil has not said what the device will cost.

“I can’t speak to the veracity of his latest data,” which has not been published, Dr. O’Hara added, “but the preliminary data I have seen is compelling. It could be a significant contribution to the field as a window into brain architecture.”

Dr. Terry Heiman-Patterson, a neurologist and A.L.S. specialist at the Drexel University College of Medicine, said she was in discussions with NeuroVigil to use the device on A.L.S. patients, to see how they fared with it in comparison with instruments that use multiple channels and electrodes.

“Dr. Low is researching signals that look for intent, which is becoming very exciting because it looks like they may be able to do it — for Stephen Hawking and for others with A.L.S.,” Dr. Heiman-Patterson said.

“Patients want to be able to communicate beyond the yes or no with an eye blink. They want to send an e-mail, and turn off the light and, even more, to have a meaningful conversation.”

Monitors like the iBrain are also being used to assess whether experimental neurological drugs are working in clinical trials.

In 2009, NeuroVigil completed a deal with the drug giant Hoffmann-La Roche to test the iBrain. Neither company has released details of their early tests. NeuroVigil’s strategy, Dr. Low said, is to run clinical trials with Roche and other partners in industry and academia, and to seek approval from the Food and Drug Administration.

Other companies also make single-channel brain monitors, but unlike NeuroVigil they sell the devices and software directly to consumers online.

Zeo, for example, based in Massachusetts, concentrates on measuring sleep patterns through a smartphone app or a clock-radio device — available for $99 and $143, respectively. Emotiv Systems, in San Francisco, offers its Epoc headset for $299 plus a range of apps and add-ons that include neurofeedback, 3-D brain-mapping tools and games like Angry Birds, all using a combination of thoughts and facial muscle movements recorded by several electrodes that are in contact with a customer’s head.

“We have no plans to take an academic route,” said Zeo’s chief executive, Dave Dickinson, who added that his company’s customers had logged one million hours of sleep time. He would not say how many devices had been sold. Emotiv was founded in 2003 and has reportedly shipped 10,000 devices.

Dr. Low plans to team up again with Dr. Hawking this summer in Cambridge to present their initial data at a neuroscience meeting in early July. NeuroVigil will continue to work with Dr. Hawking and his team to refine their technology to decipher signals generated by Dr. Hawking’s thoughts. “At the moment I think my cheek switch is faster” than the brain-computer interface, Dr. Hawking said in an e-mail sent by an assistant, “ but should the position change I will try Philip Low’s system.”

Much work remains, however, including the integration of Dr. Hawking’s brain waves with the computers and devices that allow him to communicate.

“Wouldn’t it be wonderful,” Dr. Low said, “to have a mind like Stephen Hawking’s be able to communicate even a little bit better?”

SAN DIEGO — Already surrounded by machines that allow him, painstakingly, to communicate, the physicist Stephen Hawking last summer donned what looked like a rakish black headband that held a feather-light device the size of a small matchbox.

Enlarge This Image

Howard Guest/Reuters

COMMUNICATION Stephen Hawking’s glasses pick up twitches in his cheek.

RSS Feed

RSS Get Science News From The New York Times »

Called the iBrain, this simple-looking contraption is part of an experiment that aims to allow Dr. Hawking — long paralyzed by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease — to communicate by merely thinking.

The iBrain is part of a new generation of portable neural devices and algorithms intended to monitor and diagnose conditions like sleep apnea, depression and autism. Invented by a team led by Philip Low, a 32-year-old neuroscientist who is chief executive of NeuroVigil, a company based in San Diego, the iBrain is gaining attention as a possible alternative to expensive sleep labs that use rubber and plastic caps riddled with dozens of electrodes and usually require a patient to stay overnight.

“The iBrain can collect data in real time in a person’s own bed, or when they’re watching TV, or doing just about anything,” Dr. Low said.

The device uses a single channel to pick up waves of electrical brain signals, which change with different activities and thoughts, or with the pathologies that accompany brain disorders.

But the raw waves are hard to read because they must pass through the many folds of the brain and then the skull, so they are interpreted with an algorithm that Dr. Low first created for his Ph.D., earned in 2007 at the University of California, San Diego. (The original research, published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was done on zebra finches.)

About the Hawking experiment, he said, “The idea is to see if Stephen can use his mind to create a consistent and repeatable pattern that a computer can translate into, say, a word or letter or a command for a computer.”

The researchers traveled to Dr. Hawking’s offices in Cambridge, England, fitted him with the iBrain headband and asked him “to imagine that he was scrunching his right hand into a ball,” Dr. Low said. “Of course, he can’t actually move his hand, but the motor cortex in his brain can still issue the command and generate electrical waves in his brain.”

The algorithm, called Spears, was able to discern Dr. Hawking’s thoughts as signals, which were represented as a series of spikes on a grid.

“We wanted to see if there was any change in the signal,” Dr. Low said. “And in fact, we did see a change in the signal.” NeuroVigil plans to repeat the study in large populations of patients with A.L.S. and other neurodegenerative diseases.

These preliminary results come as Dr. Hawking’s ability to communicate diminishes as his disease progresses. The 70-year-old physicist, whose mind has produced crucial insights in theoretical physics as well as the best-seller “A Brief History of Time,” now needs several minutes to generate a simple message. He uses a pair of infrared glasses that picks up twitches in his cheek. His team in Cambridge, England, has dubbed this the “cheek switch.”

“Dr. Low and his company have done some outstanding work in this field,” Dr. Hawking said in a statement. “I am participating in this project in the hope that I can offer insights and practical advice to NeuroVigil. I wish to assist in research, encourage investment in this area, and, most importantly, to offer some future hope to people diagnosed with A.L.S. and other neurodegenerative conditions.”

The physicist has also worked with other inventors seeking to better elucidate his thoughts. Engineers at the semiconductor and computing giant Intel recently hooked up a customized computer to communicate with his cheek-reading infrared glasses, along with a voice synthesizer, a webcam for using Skype, and special monitors. Intel is developing new face-recognition software that can monitor subtle changes in expression and may help Dr. Hawking communicate more efficiently.

Scientists not connected with Dr. Low say they are encouraged by the iBrain’s potential. “Philip Low’s device is one of the best single-channel brain monitors out there,” said Ruth O’Hara, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University Medical School. She plans to use the iBrain for autism studies. NeuroVigil has not said what the device will cost.

“I can’t speak to the veracity of his latest data,” which has not been published, Dr. O’Hara added, “but the preliminary data I have seen is compelling. It could be a significant contribution to the field as a window into brain architecture.”

Dr. Terry Heiman-Patterson, a neurologist and A.L.S. specialist at the Drexel University College of Medicine, said she was in discussions with NeuroVigil to use the device on A.L.S. patients, to see how they fared with it in comparison with instruments that use multiple channels and electrodes.

“Dr. Low is researching signals that look for intent, which is becoming very exciting because it looks like they may be able to do it — for Stephen Hawking and for others with A.L.S.,” Dr. Heiman-Patterson said.

“Patients want to be able to communicate beyond the yes or no with an eye blink. They want to send an e-mail, and turn off the light and, even more, to have a meaningful conversation.”

Monitors like the iBrain are also being used to assess whether experimental neurological drugs are working in clinical trials.

In 2009, NeuroVigil completed a deal with the drug giant Hoffmann-La Roche to test the iBrain. Neither company has released details of their early tests. NeuroVigil’s strategy, Dr. Low said, is to run clinical trials with Roche and other partners in industry and academia, and to seek approval from the Food and Drug Administration.

Other companies also make single-channel brain monitors, but unlike NeuroVigil they sell the devices and software directly to consumers online.

Zeo, for example, based in Massachusetts, concentrates on measuring sleep patterns through a smartphone app or a clock-radio device — available for $99 and $143, respectively. Emotiv Systems, in San Francisco, offers its Epoc headset for $299 plus a range of apps and add-ons that include neurofeedback, 3-D brain-mapping tools and games like Angry Birds, all using a combination of thoughts and facial muscle movements recorded by several electrodes that are in contact with a customer’s head.

“We have no plans to take an academic route,” said Zeo’s chief executive, Dave Dickinson, who added that his company’s customers had logged one million hours of sleep time. He would not say how many devices had been sold. Emotiv was founded in 2003 and has reportedly shipped 10,000 devices.

Dr. Low plans to team up again with Dr. Hawking this summer in Cambridge to present their initial data at a neuroscience meeting in early July. NeuroVigil will continue to work with Dr. Hawking and his team to refine their technology to decipher signals generated by Dr. Hawking’s thoughts. “At the moment I think my cheek switch is faster” than the brain-computer interface, Dr. Hawking said in an e-mail sent by an assistant, “ but should the position change I will try Philip Low’s system.”

Much work remains, however, including the integration of Dr. Hawking’s brain waves with the computers and devices that allow him to communicate.

“Wouldn’t it be wonderful,” Dr. Low said, “to have a mind like Stephen Hawking’s be able to communicate even a little bit better?”

SAN DIEGO — Already surrounded by machines that allow him, painstakingly, to communicate, the physicist Stephen Hawking last summer donned what looked like a rakish black headband that held a feather-light device the size of a small matchbox.

Enlarge This Image

Howard Guest/Reuters

COMMUNICATION Stephen Hawking’s glasses pick up twitches in his cheek.

RSS Feed

RSS Get Science News From The New York Times »

Called the iBrain, this simple-looking contraption is part of an experiment that aims to allow Dr. Hawking — long paralyzed by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease — to communicate by merely thinking.

The iBrain is part of a new generation of portable neural devices and algorithms intended to monitor and diagnose conditions like sleep apnea, depression and autism. Invented by a team led by Philip Low, a 32-year-old neuroscientist who is chief executive of NeuroVigil, a company based in San Diego, the iBrain is gaining attention as a possible alternative to expensive sleep labs that use rubber and plastic caps riddled with dozens of electrodes and usually require a patient to stay overnight.

“The iBrain can collect data in real time in a person’s own bed, or when they’re watching TV, or doing just about anything,” Dr. Low said.

The device uses a single channel to pick up waves of electrical brain signals, which change with different activities and thoughts, or with the pathologies that accompany brain disorders.

But the raw waves are hard to read because they must pass through the many folds of the brain and then the skull, so they are interpreted with an algorithm that Dr. Low first created for his Ph.D., earned in 2007 at the University of California, San Diego. (The original research, published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was done on zebra finches.)

About the Hawking experiment, he said, “The idea is to see if Stephen can use his mind to create a consistent and repeatable pattern that a computer can translate into, say, a word or letter or a command for a computer.”

The researchers traveled to Dr. Hawking’s offices in Cambridge, England, fitted him with the iBrain headband and asked him “to imagine that he was scrunching his right hand into a ball,” Dr. Low said. “Of course, he can’t actually move his hand, but the motor cortex in his brain can still issue the command and generate electrical waves in his brain.”

The algorithm, called Spears, was able to discern Dr. Hawking’s thoughts as signals, which were represented as a series of spikes on a grid.

“We wanted to see if there was any change in the signal,” Dr. Low said. “And in fact, we did see a change in the signal.” NeuroVigil plans to repeat the study in large populations of patients with A.L.S. and other neurodegenerative diseases.

These preliminary results come as Dr. Hawking’s ability to communicate diminishes as his disease progresses. The 70-year-old physicist, whose mind has produced crucial insights in theoretical physics as well as the best-seller “A Brief History of Time,” now needs several minutes to generate a simple message. He uses a pair of infrared glasses that picks up twitches in his cheek. His team in Cambridge, England, has dubbed this the “cheek switch.”

“Dr. Low and his company have done some outstanding work in this field,” Dr. Hawking said in a statement. “I am participating in this project in the hope that I can offer insights and practical advice to NeuroVigil. I wish to assist in research, encourage investment in this area, and, most importantly, to offer some future hope to people diagnosed with A.L.S. and other neurodegenerative conditions.”

The physicist has also worked with other inventors seeking to better elucidate his thoughts. Engineers at the semiconductor and computing giant Intel recently hooked up a customized computer to communicate with his cheek-reading infrared glasses, along with a voice synthesizer, a webcam for using Skype, and special monitors. Intel is developing new face-recognition software that can monitor subtle changes in expression and may help Dr. Hawking communicate more efficiently.

Scientists not connected with Dr. Low say they are encouraged by the iBrain’s potential. “Philip Low’s device is one of the best single-channel brain monitors out there,” said Ruth O’Hara, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University Medical School. She plans to use the iBrain for autism studies. NeuroVigil has not said what the device will cost.

“I can’t speak to the veracity of his latest data,” which has not been published, Dr. O’Hara added, “but the preliminary data I have seen is compelling. It could be a significant contribution to the field as a window into brain architecture.”

Dr. Terry Heiman-Patterson, a neurologist and A.L.S. specialist at the Drexel University College of Medicine, said she was in discussions with NeuroVigil to use the device on A.L.S. patients, to see how they fared with it in comparison with instruments that use multiple channels and electrodes.

“Dr. Low is researching signals that look for intent, which is becoming very exciting because it looks like they may be able to do it — for Stephen Hawking and for others with A.L.S.,” Dr. Heiman-Patterson said.

“Patients want to be able to communicate beyond the yes or no with an eye blink. They want to send an e-mail, and turn off the light and, even more, to have a meaningful conversation.”

Monitors like the iBrain are also being used to assess whether experimental neurological drugs are working in clinical trials.

In 2009, NeuroVigil completed a deal with the drug giant Hoffmann-La Roche to test the iBrain. Neither company has released details of their early tests. NeuroVigil’s strategy, Dr. Low said, is to run clinical trials with Roche and other partners in industry and academia, and to seek approval from the Food and Drug Administration.

Other companies also make single-channel brain monitors, but unlike NeuroVigil they sell the devices and software directly to consumers online.

Zeo, for example, based in Massachusetts, concentrates on measuring sleep patterns through a smartphone app or a clock-radio device — available for $99 and $143, respectively. Emotiv Systems, in San Francisco, offers its Epoc headset for $299 plus a range of apps and add-ons that include neurofeedback, 3-D brain-mapping tools and games like Angry Birds, all using a combination of thoughts and facial muscle movements recorded by several electrodes that are in contact with a customer’s head.

“We have no plans to take an academic route,” said Zeo’s chief executive, Dave Dickinson, who added that his company’s customers had logged one million hours of sleep time. He would not say how many devices had been sold. Emotiv was founded in 2003 and has reportedly shipped 10,000 devices.

Dr. Low plans to team up again with Dr. Hawking this summer in Cambridge to present their initial data at a neuroscience meeting in early July. NeuroVigil will continue to work with Dr. Hawking and his team to refine their technology to decipher signals generated by Dr. Hawking’s thoughts. “At the moment I think my cheek switch is faster” than the brain-computer interface, Dr. Hawking said in an e-mail sent by an assistant, “ but should the position change I will try Philip Low’s system.”

Much work remains, however, including the integration of Dr. Hawking’s brain waves with the computers and devices that allow him to communicate.

“Wouldn’t it be wonderful,” Dr. Low said, “to have a mind like Stephen Hawking’s be able to communicate even a little bit better?”

Here’s our interview with Philip Low at TEDMED 2009:

News is out today that Neurovigil (La Jolla, California), a company founded by Philip Low who developed a way to decode brain activity from single channel EEG, may have broken the record books for the largest first round of financing valuation, significantly beating out even the combined seed valuations of Google and Facebook.

Neurovigil is reporting that the round was led by an “American industrialist and technology visionary” and amounted to less than two percent of the company’s stock. Based on information from someone familiar with the deal, we suspect it is either Bill Gates, Sergey Brin (he does have a gene associated with Parkinson’s), Qualcomm’s Paul Jacobs, Larry Ellison, or perhaps even Steve Jobs.

Neurovigil’s technology is the first substantial breakthrough in really understanding the information within brain waves. At TEDMED 2009, Low demonstrated how the system can detect biomarkers of brain activity. The potential associated with understanding what the brain is doing is really incredible for medicine, psychology, entertainment, and all kinds of research, and the valuation of the investment, for the company’s common stock, clearly certifies that fact.

source : http://www.neurovigil.com/

Full story

New Microfluidic Chip for Low Cost, Rapid Testing of Influenza Strains

New Microfluidic Chip for Low Cost, Rapid Testing of Influenza Strains

New Microfluidic Chip for Low Cost, Rapid Testing of Influenza Strains

The novel H1N1 flu pandemic in 2009 underscored weaknesses in methods widely used to diagnose the flu, from frequent false negatives to long wait times for results. Now a four-year, National Institutes of Health-funded study of 146 patients with flu-like symptoms spearheaded by Associate Professor Catherine Klapperich (BME, MSE) has validated a prototype rapid, low-cost, accurate, point-of-care device that promises a better standard of care. Once optimized and deployed in the clinic, the new device could provide clinicians with an effective tool to quickly diagnose both seasonal and pandemic strains of influenza, and thus limit the spread of infection.

The study’s research team—Klapperich, Qingqing Cao (ME PhD’11), Madhumita Mahalanabis (BME postdoctoral fellow), Jessie Chang (BME MS’10), Brendan Carey (BME’11), Christopher Hsieh (BME’11) and Ahjegannie Stanley (summer intern) from the College of Engineering; medical personnel from the Boston University Medical Center (BUMC) Emergency Department; and an infectious disease physician from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC)/ Harvard Medical School—published its findings in the March 22 online edition of PLoS ONE.

To produce a faster, cheaper, highly accurate flu diagnostic test that could be run at the point of care, the researchers miniaturized an expensive, three-hour, lab-scale diagnostic test—known as RT-PCR and now considered the gold standard in flu detection—into a single-use microfluidic chip. About the size of a standard microscope slide, the integrated chip consists of a column at the top that extracts RNA from signature proteins in the sample associated with the influenza A virus; a middle chamber that converts the RNA into DNA; and a climate-controlled lower channel used to replicate the DNA in sufficient quantities so it can be detected by an external reader.

Working with two types of nasal specimens, the researchers used the chip to produce results that matched the high accuracy and relatively fast turn-around time of the lab-scale method.

“We wanted to show that our technique was feasible on real-world samples prepared on the chip,” said Klapperich. “Making each chip single-use decreases the possibility of cross-contamination between specimens, and the chip’s small size makes it a good candidate for true point-of-care testing.”

The microfluidic chip also proved far more effective than other commonly used flu diagnostic tests including viral culture, a lab procedure requiring up to a week to produce results; rapid immunoassays, which work like pregnancy tests but were only 40 percent reliable in detecting the presence of a flu virus in this study; and direct fluorescent antigen testing (DFA), a more accurate but labor-intensive process in which medical personnel prepare and interpret samples stained with fluorescent antibodies.

“The new test represents a major improvement over viral culture in terms of turn-around time, over rapid immunoassay tests in terms of sensitivity (ability to detect the virus from minimal sample material) and over DFA and RT-PCR in terms of ease of use and portability,” Klapperich observed.

Ultimately seeking to enable clinicians to use their microfluidic chips for frontline flu virus detection, the researchers next plan to optimize their method so that it can produce results in a third less time (an hour) with chips that cost half as much to make (five dollars). In addition, they are exploring ways to develop a lower cost external reader that’s no bigger than a clinical digital thermometer.

A rapid, low cost, accurate point-of-care (POC) device to detect influenza virus is needed for effective treatment and control of both seasonal and pandemic strains. We developed a single-use microfluidic chip that integrates solid phase extraction (SPE) and molecular amplification via a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify influenza virus type A RNA. We demonstrated the ability of the chip to amplify influenza A RNA in human nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) and nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) specimens collected at two clinical sites from 2008–2010. The microfluidic test was dramatically more sensitive than two currently used rapid immunoassays and had high specificity that was essentially equivalent to the rapid assays and direct fluorescent antigen (DFA) testing. We report 96% (CI 89%,99%) sensitivity and 100% (CI 95%,100%) specificity compared to conventional (bench top) RT-PCR based on the testing of n = 146 specimens (positive predictive value = 100%(CI 94%,100%) and negative predictive value = 96%(CI 88%,98%)). These results compare well with DFA performed on samples taken during the same time period (98% (CI 91%,100%) sensitivity and 96%(CI 86%,99%) specificity compared to our gold standard testing). Rapid immunoassay tests on samples taken during the enrollment period were less reliable (49%(CI 38%,61%) sensitivity and 98%(CI 98%,100%) specificity). The microfluidic test extracted and amplified influenza A RNA directly from clinical specimens with viral loads down to 103 copies/ml in 3 h or less. The new test represents a major improvement over viral culture in terms of turn around time, over rapid immunoassay tests in terms of sensitivity, and over bench top RT-PCR and DFA in terms of ease of use and portability.

Researchers from Boston University and Harvard Medical School have been testing a new microfluidic chip that performs nucleic acid extraction and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) in one device and features easily adjustable thermal and fluidic control.

The team hopes that the new technology will speed up and make more available rapid testing and identification of influenza infections.

More about the chip from Boston University’s announcement:

f84j0fv9jf New Microfluidic Chip for Low Cost, Rapid Testing of Influenza Strains

To produce a faster, cheaper, highly accurate flu diagnostic test that could be run at the point of care, the researchers miniaturized an expensive, three-hour, lab-scale diagnostic test—known as RT-PCR and now considered the gold standard in flu detection—into a single-use microfluidic chip. About the size of a standard microscope slide, the integrated chip consists of a column at the top that extracts RNA from signature proteins in the sample associated with the influenza A virus; a middle chamber that converts the RNA into DNA; and a climate-controlled lower channel used to replicate the DNA in sufficient quantities so it can be detected by an external reader.

Working with two types of nasal specimens, the researchers used the chip to produce results that matched the high accuracy and relatively fast turn-around time of the lab-scale method.

The microfluidic chip also proved far more effective than other commonly used flu diagnostic tests including viral culture, a lab procedure requiring up to a week to produce results; rapid immunoassays, which work like pregnancy tests but were only 40 percent reliable in detecting the presence of a flu virus in this study; and direct fluorescent antigen testing (DFA), a more accurate but labor-intensive process in which medical personnel prepare and interpret samples stained with fluorescent antibodies.

Source : http://www.bu.edu/phpbin/news-cms/news/?dept=666&id=59219

Full story

Unveiled: Terumo’s NaviCross Support Catheters for PAD

Unveiled: Terumo’s NaviCross Support Catheters for PAD

Unveiled: Terumo’s NaviCross Support Catheters for PAD

Terumo Medical has launched its NaviCross Support Catheter line for snaking through vasculature Terumo NaviCross Unveiled: Terumos NaviCross Support Catheters for PADwhen intervening during treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD) and Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI).

Featuring Terumo Glide Technology™ hydrophilic coating and a seamless guidewire-to-catheter transition, the NaviCross has been designed for accessing and tracking through even the most complex lesions. The shaft incorporates a stainless steel double-braided layer, combined with a 12mm tapered tip, giving it best-in-class pushability*. The catheter is compatible with .035” wire platforms and 4Fr sheaths and is available with a straight or 30 degree angled tip allowing access to vascular branches including below the knee (BTK) collaterals. It features 3 radiopaque marker bands to facilitate accurate assessment of position, while their unique spacing provides easy measurement of common balloon and stent sizes.

“The design of the NaviCross allows for true 1:1 torque with complete force transmission from my hand to the tip of the catheter without lag time or delay,” said Dr. Jihad Mustapha, Director of Endovascular Interventions and Director of Cardiovascular Research at Metro Heart & Vascular, Metro Health Hospital, Wyoming, MI. “It excels in long length lesions and is ideal for any chronic or highgrade stenoses that are located in or at an angulated vessel segment. One of the most superior support catheters for pushability, crossability, trackabilty, torquability, and (tip) visualization, there is also no buckling, which (may) lower the risk of dissection and perforations.”

SOMERSET, NJ (March 23, 2012) — Terumo Interventional Systems, a strategic business unit

of Terumo Medical Corporation, today announced the expansion of its peripheral catheter portfolio with

the nationwide availability of its new line of NaviCross™ Support Catheters, designed to provide

interventionalists with significantly greater wire support for the access and treatment of peripheral artery

disease (PAD) and Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI).

Featuring Terumo Glide Technology™ hydrophilic coating and a seamless guidewire-to-catheter

transition, the NaviCross has been designed for accessing and tracking through even the most complex

lesions. The shaft incorporates a stainless steel double-braided layer, combined with a 12mm tapered tip,

giving it best-in-class pushability*. The catheter is compatible with .035” wire platforms and 4Fr sheaths

and is available with a straight or 30 degree angled tip allowing access to vascular branches including

below the knee (BTK) collaterals. It features 3 radiopaque marker bands to facilitate accurate

assessment of position, while their unique spacing provides easy measurement of common balloon and

stent sizes.

“The design of the NaviCross allows for true 1:1 torque with complete force transmission from

my hand to the tip of the catheter without lag time or delay,” said Dr. Jihad Mustapha, Director of

Endovascular Interventions and Director of Cardiovascular Research at Metro Heart & Vascular, Metro

Health Hospital, Wyoming, MI. “It excels in long length lesions and is ideal for any chronic or highgrade

stenoses that are located in or at an angulated vessel segment. One of the most superior support

catheters for pushability, crossability, trackabilty, torquability, and (tip) visualization, there is also no

buckling, which (may) lower the risk of dissection and perforations.”

- more -

(Terumo Launches NaviCross Support Catheters …page 2)

“The NaviCross Support Catheter is Terumo Interventional Systems’ first entry into the support

catheter category,” said said Chris Pearson, Vice President, Marketing, Terumo Interventional Systems.

“As the leaders in entry site management and lesion access, we feel this catheter is the perfect

complement to our comprehensive peripheral portfolio of wires, catheters, and sheaths. NaviCross was

specifically engineered for simplicity with best-in-class safety and performance in mind and is designed

to excel when used with Terumo’s market leading Glidewire®. It allows our customers to confidently

treat most peripheral lesions, without the need for more expensive crossing devices or therapies.”

For more information about the NaviCross Support Catheters, customers can contact Terumo

Interventional Systems by calling its Inside Sales Specialist Team at 800-862-4143 or by visiting

www.terumois.com.

*Data on file

Terumo Interventional Systems

Terumo Interventional Systems (TIS), a strategic business unit of Terumo Medical Corporation, directly

markets a full line of guidewires, catheters, introducer sheaths, guiding sheaths and embolization

products for use in a multitude of different interventional procedures. Interventional Radiologists,

Interventional Neuroradiologists, Interventional Cardiologists, and Vascular Surgeons are among the

medical professionals that depend upon TIS products to access and cross difficult-to-reach lesions,

thereby allowing therapeutic intervention in previously unreachable vascular beds.

Terumo Medical Corporation

Founded in 1972 as a Terumo Corporation subsidiary, Terumo Medical Corporation (TMC) develops,

manufactures, and markets high-quality medical devices used in a broad range of applications in

numerous healthcare markets. TMC manufactures a broad portfolio of needles and syringes, entry-site

management products, and a line of sterile connection devices used in hospitals and blood banks

worldwide.

Terumo Corporation

Tokyo-based Terumo Corporation is one of the world’s leading medical device manufacturers with $4.0

billion in sales and operations in more than 160 nations. Founded in 1921, the company develops,

manufactures, and distributes world-class medical devices including products for use in cardiothoracic

surgery, interventional procedures, and transfusion medicine; the company also manufactures a broad

array of syringe and hypodermic needle products for hospital and physician office use. Terumo

contributes to society by providing valued products and services to the healthcare market and by

responding to the needs of healthcare providers and the people they serve.

- more -

(Terumo Launches NaviCross Support Catheters …page 3)

Terumo Corporation’s shares are listed on the first section of the Tokyo Stock Exchange (No. 4543,

Reuters symbol, or Bloomberg 4543: JP) and is a component of the Nikkei 225, Japan’s

leading stock index.

Source : www.FINAL-NaviCross-Press-Release-3-22-12.pdf

Full story

ThermoDock iPhone Plugin Device Measures Body Temp

ThermoDock iPhone Plugin Device Measures Body Temp

ThermoDock iPhone Plugin Device Measures Body Temp

The range of medical peripherals available for the iPhone is growing rapidly. We have IBGStar for blood glucose measurements, AliveCor for heart rhythm checks, and many more. Add to that list ThermoDock.

Many healthcare providers will be familiar with the temporal artery probe used in many hospitals, which use infrared technology to measure body temperature. These devices are especially useful for intubated patients and children; frankly, they are probably more comfortable for most patients than holding a thermometer in their mouths (let alone some of the other places temperature is measured).

ThermoDock, developed by German device maker Medisana, goes one step further (or perhaps one step back) and measures body temperature without even touching the patient. Using a small peripheral for the iPhone or iPad, ThermoDock uses similar infrared technology to the temporal artery probe to calculate body temperature.

It is part of a suite of devices made for the iPhone and iPad including blood glucose monitors, blood pressure monitors, and weight scales that can already be purchased in the United States. But there are some important factors to consider before you rush out to get one or suggest it to your patients.

According to the technical specifications supplied by Medisana, ThermoDock can measure body temperature to an accuracy of +/- 0.2-0.3 degrees celsius in about 4 seconds. They also cite that the “clinical repeatability” as 0.19 degrees celsius. To do all of this, the device is powered by the connected iPhone or iPad.

The app collects and displays data in the free VitalDoc app which can store data, display trends, and transmit information via email.

Medisana also makes several other products for iOS devices including the CardioDock, GlucoDock, and the inexplicably named Targetscale Body Analysis Scale with Target Function. Data from all of these devices is collected and displayed in the VitalDock app.

ThermoDock is available throughFirebox, where it can be purchased for $96 plus tax and shipping. Other Medisana products can be purchased here as well – the Targetscale goes for about $200 plus tax and shipping.

However, its unclear what sort of clinical testing the device has actually undergone. It has not yet received FDA approval. The device does have CE certification (CD 0483) for sale in Europe. The same appears to be true of the other devices marketed by Medisana. Its not entirely clear whether FDA clearance is something that Medisana is pursuing though other infrared thermometers have certainly sought 510(k) clearance in the past.

Nonetheless, this device certainly continues the march towards medical technology that embraces form as much as it does function.

Medisana, a German firm out of Düsseldorf, released a nifty heat sensing dock for iPhones and iPads that may even be used to check one’s body temperature.

Simply point the infrared sensor at whichever body part you’re interested in, and the matching app will register the reading for future reference.

From the product page:

ThermoDock plugin 300×181 ThermoDock iPhone Plugin Device Measures Body Temp

Reliable and accurate measurement of body temperature with non-contact infrared technology

Diverse applications for measuring surfaces or liquids using the Live-Mode function

Memory for storing multiple user profiles

Automatic data management, clear presentation of measurement results and comment function

Intuitive menu navigation and easy data exchange via e-mail

Data security through storage of data on personal iPhone®, iPod touch® or iPad®

Free download and automatic installation of VitaDock® app

Certified medical device

3-year warranty

Compatible with: iPod touch (4th gen.), iPod touch (3rd gen.), iPod touch (2nd gen.), iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 3G, iPad 2, iPad

Source : http://www.imedicalapps.com/2012/04/thermodock-temperature-easy-owning-smartphone/

Full story

The Quantified Heart

The Quantified Heart

The Quantified Heart

Dr. Mark Drangsholt is a long-time self-tracker who also teaches evidence-based medicine at the University of Washington. He has tracked blood pressure and exercise, atrial fibrillation and what triggers it, deep sleep and sex, diet and body fat. In the video below, Mark shares what he learned about his arrhythmia triggers, and how his self-tracking data helped sway his cardiologist to do a less invasive procedure. He also makes a great case that Quantified Self experiments can be more scientifically valid than many of his colleagues would like to admit. (Filmed by the Seattle QS Show&Tell meetup group.)

We have been following the Quantified Self movement closely over the last number of years as a medical/wellness technology related trend that may someday hook into more personalized delivery of healthcare. The movement has been enabled by the wide range of data logging consumer and medical devices and sensors, which allow people to accumulate and analyze data from many aspects of their lives from productivity to sleep patterns.

The team over at the Quantified Self Blog have been a large force in promoting this movement and have just released a great video presentation from a medical self-tracker, Dr. Mark Drangsholt. Mark teaches evidence-based medicine at the University of Washington and talks through a number of self tracking experiments he carried out to get a handle on his heart condition. What is particularly interesting about this talk is how Mark describes the quantified self movement in the context of evidence based medicine and clinical decision making.

Source : quantifiedself.com/2012/04/mark-drangsholt/

www.?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+QuantifiedSelf+(The+Quantified+Self)

Full story

Idaho Technology’s FilmArray RP Respiratory Pathogen Detector

Idaho Technology’s FilmArray RP Respiratory Pathogen Detector

Idaho Technology’s FilmArray RP Respiratory Pathogen Detector

Improve diagnosis by testing for more respiratory viruses and bacteria using the same easy workflow. Our FilmArray Respiratory Panels test for a comprehensive list of respiratory pathogens which cause upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). The FilmArray integrates sample preparation, amplification, detection, and analysis into one simple system that requires 2 minutes of hands on time and has a total run time of about 1 hour.

Idaho Technology, Inc., oddly based in Salt Lake City, Utah, is making available in Europe its FilmArray Respiratory Panel (FilmArray RP) that can detect up to 21 viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens within about an hour. The FilmArray RP that is already available in the U.S., and it has regulatory clearance for identifying 15 pathogen types.

 

Here are the 25 pathogens FilmArray RP can detect:

Adenovirus, Bocavirus, Coronavirus 229E, Coronavirus HKU1, Coronavirus NL63, Coronavirus OC43, Human Metapneumovirus, Influenza A, Influenza A subtype H1, Influenza A subtype H3, Influenza A subtype H1 2009, Influenza B, Parainfluenza virus 1, Parainfluenza virus 2, Parainfluenza virus 3, Parainfluenza virus 4, Rhinovirus/Enterovirus, Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Bordetella pertussis, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumonia.

Our success is based upon your success. Therefore we have provided many online resources to help you learn more about our products and technology. Use the links below to browse through our expanding list of multimedia tutorials and online learning events.

Source : http://www.idahotech.com/FilmArray/RespiratoryTest.html

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Full story

Page 1 of 212
Copyright © 2017 Medical Technology & Gadgets Blog MedicalBuy.net. All rights reserved.
Proudly powered by WordPress. Developed by Deluxe Themes