Archive for August 22nd, 2012

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Visi Mobile System for Real Time Wireless In-Hospital Vital Signs Monitoring (video)

Visi Mobile System for Real Time Wireless In-Hospital Vital Signs Monitoring (video)

Visi Mobile System for Real Time Wireless In-Hospital Vital Signs Monitoring

Eastman Chemical Company, DD Studio, PolyOne and Phillips Plastics have teamed up to create a vitals monitoring device for Sotera Wireless. The ViSi Mobile will measure blood pressure and heart rate, and it will be chemically resistant and waterproof.

The ViSi Mobile™ system is composed of a wireless device that straps to a patient’s arm to monitor vital signs, such as blood pressure and heart rate; a monitoring device to keep clinicians connected to patients’ information; and a charging station.

The device’s lens, housing, printed circuit board assembly and connectors are made with Eastman Tritan™ copolyester MX711. The cold-swaging ability of Tritan allows for fit and press assembly of the device, which offers a tight, smooth, continuous fit between parts; allows for joining parts without the use of chemicals, adhesives or mechanical fasteners; and saves energy. By utilizing Tritan, the device features superior resistance to chemicals used in disinfectants and cleansers — without cracking or crazing. The material also exceeded durability requirements, which is particularly valuable in mobile devices that are used frequently or could be dropped or damaged should a patient fall.

To protect the device from water and fluids found in the hospital environment, it had to meet IPX7 requirements of withstanding water submersion for 60 minutes at a depth of 1 meter. DD Studio relied on compatibility samples and testing results from PolyOne to select GLS Versaflex™ OM 3060 TPE. It successfully adheres to the Eastman Tritan™ copolyester substrate to seal the device housing, including speaker port and microphone, from water seepage and protect internal electronics.

Sotera Wireless introduces the ViSi Mobile System, a platform for comprehensive vital signs monitoring that is designed to keep clinicians connected to their patients, whether in or out of bed, or while in transport – “monitoring in motion.” Featuring comfortable body-worn sensors that allow for freedom of movement, the system enables highly accurate, continuous monitoring of all vital signs.

The ViSi Mobile System is able to measure and display all core vital signs (Blood Pressure, Heart Rate / Pulse Rate, 3-lead or 5-lead ECG, SpO2, Respiration Rate, Skin Temperature) with monitoring accuracy and resolution, typically found in ICUs. In addition to the color touchscreen display on the patient-worn device, desktop PCs, tablet PCs and other mobile platforms can be utilized as remote viewing and notification devices. ViSi Mobile is able to wirelessly transmit data, leveraging existing hospital WiFi infrastructure, and is designed to provide information output in electronic form (i.e. EMR connectivity) as well as print-outs. Going forward, the ViSi Mobile System will also include Sotera’s patented cuffless non-invasive blood pressure (cNIBP) on a beat-to-beat basis, as well as patient posture / activity as a “new vital sign.”

ViSi Mobile is a comprehensive system, designed to enhance patient safety by allowing early detection of patient deterioration and connecting clinicians with their patients anywhere, any time.

The FDA has cleared Sotera Wireless‘ ViSi Mobile System that’s designed for monitoring of vital signs of ambulatory patients in non-ICU clinical settings. The wrist-worn device works with a number of sensors that measure blood pressure, heart rate / pulse rate, SpO2, respiratory rate, skin temperature, as well as 3-lead or 5-lead ECG. visi mobile system side Visi Mobile System for Real Time Wireless In Hospital Vital Signs Monitoring (video)All the data is sent over a standard (802.11) in-hospital wireless network to a central server for simultaneous real-time monitoring of all the patients on the floor using a computer or a tablet PC.

The company promises the next version of the device will provide continuous non-invasive blood pressure monitoring as well as the patient’s posture and activity levels.

From the product page:

In addition to the color touchscreen display on the patient-worn device, desktop PCs, tablet PCs and other mobile platforms can be utilized as remote viewing and notification devices. ViSi Mobile is able to wirelessly transmit data, leveraging existing hospital WiFi infrastructure, and is designed to provide information output in electronic form (i.e. EMR connectivity) as well as print-outs.

Source : http://www.visimobile.com/overview/

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New Glucometer from Purdue Measures Glucose in Tears, Saliva

New Glucometer from Purdue Measures Glucose in Tears, Saliva

New Glucometer from Purdue Measures Glucose in Tears, Saliva

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Researchers have created a new type of biosensor that can detect minute concentrations of glucose in saliva, tears and urine and might be manufactured at low cost because it does not require many processing steps to produce.

“It’s an inherently non-invasive way to estimate glucose content in the body,” said Jonathan Claussen, a former Purdue University doctoral student and now a research scientist at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. “Because it can detect glucose in the saliva and tears, it’s a platform that might eventually help to eliminate or reduce the frequency of using pinpricks for diabetes testing. We are proving its functionality.”

Claussen and Purdue doctoral student Anurag Kumar led the project, working with Timothy Fisher, a Purdue professor of mechanical engineering; D. Marshall Porterfield, a professor of agricultural and biological engineering; and other researchers at the university’s Birck Nanotechnology Center.

Findings are detailed in a research paper being published this week in the journal Advanced Functional Materials.

“Most sensors typically measure glucose in blood,” Claussen said. “Many in the literature aren’t able to detect glucose in tears and the saliva. What’s unique is that we can sense in all four different human serums: the saliva, blood, tears and urine. And that hasn’t been shown before.”

The paper, featured on the journal’s cover, was written by Claussen, Kumar, Fisher, Porterfield and Purdue researchers David B. Jaroch, M. Haseeb Khawaja and Allison B. Hibbard.

The sensor has three main parts: layers of nanosheets resembling tiny rose petals made of a material called graphene, which is a single-atom-thick film of carbon; platinum nanoparticles; and the enzyme glucose oxidase.

Each petal contains a few layers of stacked graphene. The edges of the petals have dangling, incomplete chemical bonds, defects where platinum nanoparticles can attach. Electrodes are formed by combining the nanosheet petals and platinum nanoparticles. Then the glucose oxidase attaches to the platinum nanoparticles. The enzyme converts glucose to peroxide, which generates a signal on the electrode.

“Typically, when you want to make a nanostructured biosensor you have to use a lot of processing steps before you reach the final biosensor product,” Kumar said. “That involves lithography, chemical processing, etching and other steps. The good thing about these petals is that they can be grown on just about any surface, and we don’t need to use any of these steps, so it could be ideal for commercialization.”

In addition to diabetes testing, the technology might be used for sensing a variety of chemical compounds to test for other medical conditions.

“Because we used the enzyme glucose oxidase in this work, it’s geared for diabetes,” Claussen said. “But we could just swap out that enzyme with, for example, glutemate oxidase, to measure the neurotransmitter glutamate to test for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, or ethanol oxidase to monitor alcohol levels for a breathalyzer. It’s very versatile, fast and portable.”

The technology is able to detect glucose in concentrations as low as 0.3 micromolar, far more sensitive than other electrochemical biosensors based on graphene or graphite, carbon nanotubes and metallic nanoparticles, Claussen said

“These are the first findings to report such a low sensing limit and, at the same time, such a wide sensing range,” he said.

The sensor is able to distinguish between glucose and signals from other compounds that often cause interference in sensors: uric acid, ascorbic acid and acetaminophen, which are commonly found in the blood. Unlike glucose, those compounds are said to be electroactive, which means they generate an electrical signal without the presence of an enzyme.

Glucose by itself doesn’t generate a signal but must first react with the enzyme glucose oxidase. Glucose oxidase is used in commercial diabetes test strips for conventional diabetes meters that measure glucose with a finger pinprick.

The enzyme glucose oxidase is immobilized on a 3D matrix consisting of multilayered graphene petal nanosheets peppered with Pt nanoparticles. Glucose binds within the enzyme pocket producing H2O2, while consuming O2, during electrochemical glucose sensing. As reported on page 3399 by Timothy S. Fisher and co-workers the size, morphology, and density of the Pt nanoparticles are manipulated to enhance sensor performance. Enzymes are enlarged to illustrate functionality.

Source : http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2012/Q3/sensor-detects-glucose-in-saliva-and-tears-for-diabetes-testing.html

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Case Western University Developing Emergency Treatment for Internal Bleeding

Case Western University Developing Emergency Treatment for Internal Bleeding

Case Western University Developing Emergency Treatment for Internal Bleeding

PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 20, 2012 — Progress toward a new emergency treatment for internal bleeding — counterpart to the tourniquets, pressure bandages and Quick Clot products that keep people from bleeding to death from external wounds — was reported here today at the 244th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

Erin Lavik, Sc.D., who described the advance toward developing synthetic platelets, said it is among the efforts underway world-wide to treat bleeding from “blunt-force” injuries — in car accidents like the crash that killed Princess Diana, for instance, and the battlefield blast waves from bombs and other weapons that are the leading cause of battlefield deaths. Sports injuries, falls and other problems likewise can cause internal bleeding.

Synthetic platelets

Researchers reported the development of

synthetic platelets (green), a new treatment

that could stop internal bleeding resulting from

trauma. (The scientists added color after the

image was taken.)

Credit: Erin Lavik, Ph.D. High-resolution version

“Emergency treatments for stopping the flow of blood from cuts and other external injuries save thousands of lives each year,” Lavik pointed out. “But we have nothing that emergency responders or military medics can use to stop internal bleeding permanently or at least long enough to get a patient to a hospital. There’s a tremendous need in the military, where almost 80 percent of battlefield traumas are blast injuries. In civilian life, there are many accidents, violence-related injuries and other incidents that result in internal bleeding.”

Lavik’s team, which is at Case Western Reserve University, was inspired by studies showing there are few options to treat soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq who suffer internal injuries from the roadside bombs known as improvised explosive devices and other blasts. They wanted to develop a treatment military medics could use in the field to stabilize wounded soldiers en route to definitive care in a hospital.

“The military has been phenomenal at developing technology to halt bleeding, but the technology has been effective only on external or compressible injuries,” Lavik said. “An emergency treatment for internal bleeding could provide a broader ability to stop life-threatening hemorrhage.”

Currently, no effective treatments exist that are portable and can stop internal bleeding at the scene, Lavik explained. At the hospital, however, patients typically undergo surgery and receive donated platelets or something called factor VIIa, which helps with clotting, but both can cause immune problems. Factor VIIa also can potentially cause blood clots elsewhere in the body, not just at the site of bleeding, increasing stroke risk. Other alternatives have been developed in the laboratory, but they’ve had similar side effects and are not currently used in hospitals.

Lavik and colleagues are developing synthetic platelets. These are artificial versions of the disc-shaped particles in blood that collect on the jagged edges of cut blood vessels and launch the chain of biochemical events that result in formation of a clot that stops the flow of blood. The synthetic platelets are special nanoparticles, so small that 10 would fit across the width of a single human hair. Their role is to stick to natural platelets and leverage quicker and more efficient clotting at the site of an internal wound.

The nanoparticles are spheres that are made of the same polyester material used in dissolvable sutures, and they disappear from the body after doing their work. The particles have an outer coating of polyethylene glycol (PEG), the same thick, sticky substance used as a thickening agent in skin creams, toothpastes and other consumer products. Researchers then attach a peptide, or small piece of protein, that sticks to platelets. The end product is a white powder that has a shelf-life without refrigeration of at least two weeks — almost twice as long as the donated natural platelets now administered to control bleeding. Unlike donated platelets or factor VIIa, the synthetic platelets do not require refrigeration.

In tests on laboratory rats, stand-ins for humans in such experiments, the artificial platelets worked better than factor VIIa in stopping internal bleeding and increased survival, explained Lavik. Emergency medical technicians or battlefield medics could carry the powder out into the field to treat patients immediately, which could mean the difference between life and death, Lavik noted.

Lavik explained that the development process is ongoing, and it will take several years for the treatment to reach first-responders. So far, the nanoparticles appear safe, and all of the materials used to make them are already approved for medical use.

The researchers acknowledged the National Institutes of Health Director’s New Innovator Award, 1DP2OD007338-01 and Department of Defense CDMRP award, W81XWH-11-1-0014.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society contact newsroom@acs.org.

This week at the 244th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in Philadelphia, Erin Lavik and her team of researchers from Case Western University reported on progress towards a portable treatment for stopping internal bleeding. Internal bleeding is a major problem after severe impact injuries. In the military, it is the leading cause of battlefield deaths. Yet, no effective portable treatment currently exists to stop internal bleeding, and even at a hospital, a treatment with a coagulation factor VIIa (NovoSeven) on a compassionate use basis puts the patient at risk of forming dangerous blood clots elsewhere in the body.

Lavik’s treatment is a synthetic version of platelets, which are the nano-designed disc-shaped particles in blood that promote clotting at the site of a wound. These synthetic platelets are so tiny that 10 would fit across the width of a single human hair. Their role isn’t to replace natural platelets, but to stick to them to create a faster and more efficient blood clot. The platelet nanoparticles are made up of polyester spheres, which is the same material used in dissolvable sutures. They’re surrounded by polyethylene glycol, a substance found in many consumer products. Finally a peptide is attached to the spheres to make them stick to platelets. The result is a new material that lasts twice as long as donated platelets, doesn’t require refrigeration, does its work and disappears like dissolvable sutures, and has proven itself more effective than factor VIIa in tests on rats.

Given the potential superiority over current treatment options, these lifesaving particles could soon find themselves on the front lines with medics or supplied to EMTs and first responders.

Source : http://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/

www.content?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_ARTICLEMAIN&node_id=222&content_id=CNBP_030545&use_sec=true&sec_url_var=region1&__uuid=31e146c0-fd61-4cad-a1ec-e8248329661b

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Abbott XIENCE Xpedition Coronary Drug Eluting Stent Now Available in Europe

Abbott XIENCE Xpedition Coronary Drug Eluting Stent Now Available in Europe

Abbott XIENCE Xpedition Coronary Drug Eluting Stent Now Available in Europe

Abbott Park, Illinois (NYSE: ABT) — Abbott today announced that the XIENCE Xpedition™ Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System received CE Mark in Europe for the treatment of coronary artery disease. The company is launching the product immediately in CE Mark countries. XIENCE Xpedition features a new stent delivery system designed to optimize acute performance, particularly in challenging coronary anatomies. XIENCE Xpedition is supported by the robust clinical evidence of the XIENCE family of stents, including data from more than 45,000 patients across more than 100 studies with long-term outcomes out to five years. XIENCE Xpedition is available with a broad range of indications, including use with a minimum duration of three months of dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT).

“The extraordinary deliverability of the new XIENCE Xpedition drug eluting stent system allows physicians to treat particularly complex coronary disease with great ease and confidence,” said Evald H. Christiansen, M.D., Ph.D., interventional cardiologist, Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark, who treated the first patient with XIENCE Xpedition. “Supported by robust clinical evidence from the SPIRIT family of trials, and with a broad range of indications, XIENCE Xpedition is an important advancement in drug eluting stent technology.”

The XIENCE family of stents maintains one of the broadest ranges of CE Mark indications of drug eluting stents on the market in Europe. Specifically, XIENCE Xpedition has indications to treat patients with complex disease such as diabetes, as well as an indication for a minimum duration of three months of DAPT. This indication represents an important advantage, as three months of DAPT is the shortest duration required for any major drug eluting stent offered in Europe. Long-term compliance to DAPT can be a challenge for patients and can lead to additional safety risks such as increased bleeding events. In addition, having a shorter DAPT duration after stent implantation may be beneficial in case a patient needs to interrupt or discontinue the medication prior to surgery or for other considerations.

“With XIENCE Xpedition’s excellent deliverability, broad size matrix and the option to discontinue or interrupt DAPT after three months, physicians in Europe now have a new, comprehensive offering to address the challenges of treating patients with complex coronary artery disease,” said Charles A. Simonton, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, divisional vice president, Medical Affairs, and chief medical officer, Abbott Vascular. “With XIENCE Xpedition, Abbott continues its commitment to advancing drug eluting stent technology to improve product performance and patient outcomes.”

XIENCE Xpedition is available in one of the broadest size matrices on the European market, with diameters ranging from 2.25 mm to 4 mm, including a unique 3.25 mm diameter, and lengths from 8 mm to 38 mm.

About the XIENCE Family of Drug Eluting Stents

XIENCE Xpedition is now available in Europe and other countries in Asia and the Middle East.

XIENCE Xpedition is an investigational device, limited by United States law to investigational use and is not approved or available for sale in the United States.

XIENCE PRIME® and XIENCE V® are available in the United States, Europe, the Middle East, Japan and most of Asia.

In the United States, the XIENCE PRIME stent system, including XIENCE PRIME LL (Long Lengths), is indicated for improving coronary artery luminal diameter in patients with symptomatic heart disease due to de novo native coronary artery lesions (lesions ? 32 mm) with reference vessel diameters of ? 2.25 mm to ? 4.25 mm. Additional information about XIENCE PRIME, including important safety information, is available at www.xiencestent.com or http://www.abbottvascular.com/static/cms_workspace/pdf/ifu/coronary_intervention/XIENCE_PRIME_Everolimus_Eluting_Coronary_Stent_System.pdf. In the United States, XIENCE V is indicated for improving coronary luminal diameter in patients with symptomatic heart disease due to de novo native coronary artery lesions (lesions ?28 mm) with reference vessel diameters of 2.25 mm to 4.25 mm. Additional information about XIENCE V, including important safety information, is available at www.xiencestent.com or http://www.abbottvascular.com/static/cms_workspace/pdf/ifu/coronary_intervention/XIENCE_V_Everolimus_Eluting_Coronary_Stent_System.pdf.

The MULTI-LINK stent design includes MULTI-LINK VISION®, XIENCE V, XIENCE PRIME and, most recently, XIENCE Xpedition. ;More than 11 million implants of the MULTI-LINK platform have occurred worldwide.

Everolimus, developed by Novartis Pharma AG, is a proliferation signal inhibitor, or mTOR inhibitor, licensed to Abbott by Novartis for use on its drug eluting vascular devices. Everolimus has been shown to inhibit in-stent neointimal growth in the coronary vessels following stent implantation, due to its anti-proliferative properties.

About Abbott Vascular

Abbott Vascular is the world’s leader in drug eluting stents. Abbott Vascular has an industry-leading pipeline and a comprehensive portfolio of market-leading products for cardiac and vascular care, including products for coronary artery disease, vessel closure, endovascular disease and structural heart disease.

About Abbott

Abbott (NYSE: ABT) is a global, broad-based health care company devoted to the discovery, development, manufacture and marketing of pharmaceuticals and medical products, including nutritionals, devices and diagnostics. The company employs approximately 91,000 people and markets its products in more than 130 countries.

Abbott has received European clearance and is immediately launching its XIENCE Xpedition everolimus eluting stent in CE Mark compliant countries. The stent comes with a new delivery system and is particularly geared to use in difficult patients.

As part if its CE Mark indications is use of the device with a minimum of three month dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT)., the shortest of any stent in Europe.

Long-term compliance to DAPT can be a challenge for patients and can lead to additional safety risks such as increased bleeding events. In addition, having a shorter DAPT duration after stent implantation may be beneficial in case a patient needs to interrupt or discontinue the medication prior to surgery or for other considerations.

XIENCE Xpedition is available in one of the broadest size matrices on the European market, with diameters ranging from 2.25 mm to 4 mm, including a unique 3.25 mm diameter, and lengths from 8 mm to 38 mm.

Source : http://www.abbott.com/news-media/press-releases/

www.abbott-announces-ce-mark-and-european-launch-of-nextgeneration-xience-xpedition-drug-eluting-stent.htm

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ScanX 12 SE Computed Radiography System for Podiatrists

ScanX 12 SE Computed Radiography System for Podiatrists

ScanX 12 SE Computed Radiography System for Podiatrists

ALLPRO Imaging Presents the New ScanX 12 SE Computed Radiography System at the National 2012 APMA Scientific Meeting in Washington, DC

Date: 08/16/2012

MELVILLE, New York—August 16, 2012-: ALLPRO Imaging, a trusted provider of computed radiography systems, is introducing the new ScanX®12 SE Computed Radiography Package for Podiatrists. The updated, contoured design and light color scheme is a perfect complement to contemporary office décor.

The new ScanX®12 SE features sharper digital images that are available approximately 20 percent faster than the previous model. A standard 10” x 12” phosphor imaging plate is now scanned and ready for viewing in about 30 seconds and an 8” x 10” plate can be viewed in about 25 seconds. Improved transport functionality helps to extend plate life with less plate wear. Additionally, ScanX®12 SE is very easy to operate due to the simplified status LED panel.

AllPro Imaging (Melville, New York) has released the new ScanX 12 SE new digital radiography system for podiatrists.

ScanX 12 with PACSmart ScanX 12 SE Computed Radiography System for Podiatrists

The device includes a 10” x 12” phosphor imaging sensor and provides results on a computer within 30 seconds.

Features from the product page:

ScanX 12 produces exceptional quality, high-resolution digital images through size 10? x 12?

Switching to digital eliminates all the hassles of traditional radiography

Extremely fast: view two images exposed on one 10?x12? plate in just 35 seconds

Great for space confined areas: ScanX 12 has a compact 14? x 14? footprint

Package options include laptop computer or desktop workstation

PACSmart™ Software features DICOM 3.0, HL7 Interface, Modality Worklist and Multiple Viewing Stations

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9gJPOYKF_U&feature=player_embedded

Source : http://www.allproimaging.com/healthcare/NewsMoreDetails.cfm?id=863

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IBM Granted U.S. Patent For Multi-Touch Smart Floor

IBM Granted U.S. Patent For Multi-Touch Smart Floor

IBM Granted U.S. Patent For Multi-Touch Smart Floor

1. A method implemented by a computer system, the method comprising: identifying a shape of an object in contact with an electronic multi-touch floor covering, wherein the multi-touch floor covering includes a plurality of sensors that identify shapes of objects in contact with a surface of the electronic multi-touch floor covering; retrieving an entity record from a first computer system data store, wherein the retrieved entity record corresponds to the identified shape; retrieving one or more actions from a second computer system data store, wherein the one or more actions corresponds to the retrieved entity record; sensing a plurality of objects in contact with the multi-touch floor covering; counting the plurality of sensed objects, the counting resulting in a total number of objects; comparing the total number of objects with one or more group threshold values; and performing one or more group threshold actions in response to the total number of objects exceeds one or more group threshold values.

2. An information handling system comprising: one or more processors; a memory accessible by at least one of the processors; one or more nonvolatile storage areas accessible by at least one of the processors; an electronic multi-touch floor covering that is an input device accessible by at least one of the processors, wherein the multi-touch floor covering includes a plurality of sensors that identify shapes of objects in contact with a surface of the electronic multi-touch floor covering; a set of instructions stored in the memory and executed by at least one of the processors in order to perform actions of: identifying a shape of an object in contact with the electronic multi-touch floor covering; retrieving an entity record from a first computer system data store that is stored on one of the nonvolatile storage areas, wherein the retrieved entity record corresponds to the identified shape; retrieving one or more actions from a second computer system data store that is stored on one of the nonvolatile storage areas, wherein the one or more actions corresponds to the retrieved entity record; sensing a plurality of objects in contact with the multi-touch floor covering; counting the plurality of sensed objects, the counting resulting in a total number of objects; comparing the total number of objects with one or more group threshold values; and performing one or more group threshold actions in response to the total number of objects exceeds one or more group threshold values.

3. A computer program product stored in a computer readable storage device, comprising functional descriptive material that, when executed by an information handling system, causes the information handling system to perform actions that include: identifying a shape of an object in contact with an electronic multi-touch floor covering, wherein the multi-touch floor covering includes a plurality of sensors that identify shapes of objects in contact with a surface of the electronic multi-touch floor covering; retrieving an entity record from a first computer system data store, wherein the retrieved entity record corresponds to the identified shape; retrieving one or more actions from a second computer system data store, wherein the one or more actions corresponds to the retrieved entity record; sensing a plurality of objects in contact with the multi-touch floor covering; counting the plurality of sensed objects, the counting resulting in a total number of objects; comparing the total number of objects with one or more group threshold values; and performing one or more group threshold actions in response to the total number of objects exceeds one or more group threshold values.

It has been discovered that the aforementioned challenges are resolved using an approach that uses an electronic multi-touch floor covering that has numerous sensors to identify shapes. The electronic multi-touch floor covering identifies a shape of an object that is in contact with the surface of the electronic multi-touch floor covering. An entity record is then retrieved from a data store, such as a database, with the retrieved entity record corresponding to the identified shape. Actions are then retrieved from a second data store with the actions corresponding to the retrieved entity record. The retrieved actions are then executed by the computer system.

The foregoing is a summary and thus contains, by necessity, simplifications, generalizations, and omissions of detail; consequently, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the summary is illustrative only and is not intended to be in any way limiting. Other aspects, inventive features, and advantages of the present invention, as defined solely by the claims, will become apparent in the non-limiting detailed description set forth below.

Certain specific details are set forth in the following description and figures to provide a thorough understanding of various embodiments of the invention. Certain well-known details often associated with computing and software technology are not set forth in the following disclosure, however, to avoid unnecessarily obscuring the various embodiments of the invention. Further, those of ordinary skill in the relevant art will understand that they can practice other embodiments of the invention without one or more of the details described below. Finally, while various methods are described with reference to steps and sequences in the following disclosure, the description as such is for providing a clear implementation of embodiments of the invention, and the steps and sequences of steps should not be taken as required to practice this invention. Instead, the following is intended to provide a detailed description of an example of the invention and should not be taken to be limiting of the invention itself. Rather, any number of variations may fall within the scope of the invention, which is defined by the claims that follow the description.

The following detailed description will generally follow the summary of the invention, as set forth above, further explaining and expanding the definitions of the various aspects and embodiments of the invention as necessary. To this end, this detailed description first sets forth a computing environment in FIG. 1 that is suitable to implement the software and/or hardware techniques associated with the invention. A networked environment is illustrated in FIG. 2 as an extension of the basic computing environment, to emphasize that modern computing techniques can be performed across multiple discrete devices.

FIG. 1 illustrates information handling system 100, which is a simplified example of a computer system capable of performing the computing operations described herein. Information handling system 100 includes one or more processors 110 coupled to processor interface bus 112. Processor interface bus 112 connects processors 110 to Northbridge 115, which is also known as the Memory Controller Hub (MCH). Northbridge 115 connects to system memory 120 and provides a means for processor(s) 110 to access the system memory. Graphics controller 125 also connects to Northbridge 115. In one embodiment, PCI Express bus 118 connects Northbridge 115 to graphics controller 125. Graphics controller 125 connects to display device 130, such as a computer monitor.

Northbridge 115 and Southbridge 135 connect to each other using bus 119. In one embodiment, the bus is a Direct Media Interface (DMI) bus that transfers data at high speeds in each direction between Northbridge 115 and Southbridge 135. In another embodiment, a Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) bus connects the Northbridge and the Southbridge. Southbridge 135, also known as the I/O Controller Hub (ICH) is a chip that generally implements capabilities that operate at slower speeds than the capabilities provided by the Northbridge. Southbridge 135 typically provides various busses used to connect various components. These busses include, for example, PCI and PCI Express busses, an ISA bus, a System Management Bus (SMBus or SMB), and/or a Low Pin Count (LPC) bus. The LPC bus often connects low-bandwidth devices, such as boot ROM 196 and “legacy” I/O devices (using a “super I/O” chip). The “legacy” I/O devices (198) can include, for example, serial and parallel ports, keyboard, mouse, and/or a floppy disk controller. The LPC bus also connects Southbridge 135 to Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 195. Other components often included in Southbridge 135 include a Direct Memory Access (DMA) controller, a Programmable Interrupt Controller (PIC), and a storage device controller, which connects Southbridge 135 to nonvolatile storage device 185, such as a hard disk drive, using bus 184.

ExpressCard 155 is a slot that connects hot-pluggable devices to the information handling system. ExpressCard 155 supports both PCI Express and USB connectivity as it connects to Southbridge 135 using both the Universal Serial Bus (USB) the PCI Express bus. Southbridge 135 includes USB Controller 140 that provides USB connectivity to devices that connect to the USB. These devices include webcam (camera) 150, infrared (IR) receiver 148, keyboard and trackpad 144, and Bluetooth device 146, which provides for wireless personal area networks (PANs). USB Controller 140 also provides USB connectivity to other miscellaneous USB connected devices 142, such as a mouse, removable nonvolatile storage device 145, modems, network cards, ISDN connectors, fax, printers, USB hubs, and many other types of USB connected devices. While removable nonvolatile storage device 145 is shown as a USB-connected device, removable nonvolatile storage device 145 could be connected using a different interface, such as a Firewire interface, etcetera.

Wireless Local Area Network (LAN) device 175 connects to Southbridge 135 via the PCI or PCI Express bus 172. LAN device 175 typically implements one of the IEEE 802.11 standards of over-the-air modulation techniques that all use the same protocol to wireless communicate between information handling system 100 and another computer system or device. Optical storage device 190 connects to Southbridge 135 using Serial ATA (SATA) bus 188. Serial ATA adapters and devices communicate over a high-speed serial link. The Serial ATA bus also connects Southbridge 135 to other forms of storage devices, such as hard disk drives. Audio circuitry 160, such as a sound card, connects to Southbridge 135 via bus 158. Audio circuitry 160 also provides functionality such as audio line-in and optical digital audio in port 162, optical digital output and headphone jack 164, internal speakers 166, and internal microphone 168. Ethernet controller 170 connects to Southbridge 135 using a bus, such as the PCI or PCI Express bus. Ethernet controller 170 connects information handling system 100 to a computer network, such as a Local Area Network (LAN), the Internet, and other public and private computer networks.

While FIG. 1 shows one information handling system, an information handling system may take many forms. For example, an information handling system may take the form of a desktop, server, portable, laptop, notebook, or other form factor computer or data processing system. In addition, an information handling system may take other form factors such as a personal digital assistant (PDA), a gaming device, ATM machine, a portable telephone device, a communication device or other devices that include a processor and memory.

The Trusted Platform Module (TPM 195) shown in FIG. 1 and described herein to provide security functions is but one example of a hardware security module (HSM). Therefore, the TPM described and claimed herein includes any type of HSM including, but not limited to, hardware security devices that conform to the Trusted Computing Groups (TCG) standard, and entitled “Trusted Platform Module (TPM) Specification Version 1.2.” The TPM is a hardware security subsystem that may be incorporated into any number of information handling systems, such as those outlined in FIG. 2.

FIG. 2 provides an extension of the information handling system environment shown in FIG. 1 to illustrate that the methods described herein can be performed on a wide variety of information handling systems that operate in a networked environment. Types of information handling systems range from small handheld devices, such as handheld computer/mobile telephone 210 to large mainframe systems, such as mainframe computer 270. Examples of handheld computer 210 include personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal entertainment devices, such as MP3 players, portable televisions, and compact disc players. Other examples of information handling systems include pen, or tablet, computer 220, laptop, or notebook, computer 230, workstation 240, personal computer system 250, and server 260. Other types of information handling systems that are not individually shown in FIG. 2 are represented by information handling system 280. As shown, the various information handling systems can be networked together using computer network 200. Types of computer network that can be used to interconnect the various information handling systems include Local Area Networks (LANs), Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs), the Internet, the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), other wireless networks, and any other network topology that can be used to interconnect the information handling systems. Many of the information handling systems include nonvolatile data stores, such as hard drives and/or nonvolatile memory. Some of the information handling systems shown in FIG. 2 depicts separate nonvolatile data stores (server 260 utilizes nonvolatile data store 265, mainframe computer 270 utilizes nonvolatile data store 275, and information handling system 280 utilizes nonvolatile data store 285). The nonvolatile data store can be a component that is external to the various information handling systems or can be internal to one of the information handling systems. In addition, removable nonvolatile storage device 145 can be shared among two or more information handling systems using various techniques, such as connecting the removable nonvolatile storage device 145 to a USB port or other connector of the information handling systems.

FIG. 3 is a diagram depicting a multi-touch floor covering used to sense attributes of entities, such as people and pets, at a premises. Electronic multi-touch floor covering 300 is installed on the floor of the premises where the system is installed. Electronic multi-touch floor covering 300 is a surface computing platform that responds to objects and senses users’ movements above the surface. In one embodiment, the system uses a vision system with multiple cameras that enable interaction with the floor-based system using body movements, such as foot movement, hand movement, as well as interaction with objects, such as non-animated objects (e.g., chairs, tables, etc.) as well as living objects such as pets. Objects can include people 310 that are standing so that electronic multi-touch floor covering 300 captures the shape of the person’s foot. Objects can also include people lying in a prone position 320, such as an elderly person that is lying in the middle of a living room and therefore might need help or assistance. Objects can also include animals, such as pets (dogs, cats, etc.).

The system takes different actions based upon identifying which object is in a particular location. For example, if the system senses that a small child is in an “off-limits” location, such as a swimming pool or hot tub area, the child’s caregiver can immediately be notified to prevent the child from getting hurt. Similarly, if the system senses that the family dog has entered an area that is off-limits, such as a living room or bedroom, actions can be taken accordingly. If the owner is home, the owner can be notified with an alert in order to remove the dog from the off-limits location. If no one is home, a high-pitched dog alarm can be sounded in order to have the dog retreat from the off-limits location.

FIG. 4 is a flowchart and diagram showing object and entity sensing using the multi-touch floor covering shown in FIG. 3. Floor area 301 shows a portion of the electronic multi-touch floor covering with a detailed view of sensors 302. Floor area 303 depicts an object, in this case a shoe of a particular size, on part of the electronic multi-touch floor covering. The electronic multi-touch floor covering senses the size of the object based upon the sensors that are covered by the object. The electronic multi-touch floor covering can also sense the weight of the object using electronic scales built into the electronic multi-touch floor covering. More sensors are used for more accurate object sensing.

Object sensing processing commences at 400 whereupon, at step 410, the multi-touch sensors 302 are activated for the room or area that is being monitored (e.g., for a particular area, for an entire premises, etc.). At step 420, an object, such as a shoe, is placed on the electronic multi-touch floor covering (e.g., a person walks over part of the electronic multi-touch floor covering that has been activated, etc.). At step 430, the shape of the object that has been placed over part of the electronic multi-touch floor covering is detected based upon the number and pattern (shape) of sensors that have been covered by the object. At step 440, the weight of the object that was placed on the electronic multi-touch floor covering is also detected using electronic scales built into the electronic multi-touch floor covering. The weight detected at the sensors that are proximate to the sensors covered by the object are read by the system in order to sense the weight of the object. At step 450, the object’s shape and weight are returned to the calling routine.

FIG. 5 is a flowchart showing steps taken to register an entity to the system for future identification and responsive actions. Processing commences at 500 whereupon, at step 510, the object that is being registered, such as a person, a family pet, etc., stands on a highlighted portion of the electronic multi-touch floor covering. At step 520, data concerning the object is entered into the system, including the object’s name, the type of entity, and any other data relevant to the entity. At predefined process 530, the object’s contact shape (e.g., shoe, foot, paw, etc.) is sensed and retrieved (see FIG. 4 and corresponding text for processing details). At step 540, the object’s weight is detected and retrieved. At step 545, an optional schedule is received for the object. For example, an object that is a person that works away from the premises during the work week might have a schedule indicating that the object is not present during those hours. This schedule can then be used for security actions and other actions by ascertaining when the object (person) is supposed to be at the premises and when the object is not supposed to be present.

At step 550, the data gathered (the type of object, the name of the object, the object’s contact shape, the object’s weight, and the object’s schedule) are stored in registered objects data store 560. When an object is sensed on the electronic multi-touch floor covering, registered objects data store 560 is used to determine if the object is known (registered) to the system. If the object is registered (a known object), then actions can be taken based on the particular individual. A determination is made as to whether there are more objects being registered (decision 570). If there are more objects being registered, then decision 570 branches to “yes” branch 575 which loops back to gather data regarding the next object. On the other hand, when there are no further objects to register, then decision 570 branches to “no” branch 580 and object registration processing ends at 595.

FIG. 6 is a flowchart showing steps taken to configure the monitoring settings used by the multi-touch floor covering system. Processing commences at 600 whereupon, at step 605 a registered object is selected from registered objects data store 560. At step 610, one or more monitored areas (e.g., areas with electronic multi-touch floor covering installed, such as living areas, bedrooms, hallways, etc.) are selected from monitored areas data store 615. At step 620, the user selects one or more actions to perform when the selected object enters the selected areas. These actions are selected from actions data store 625. Examples of actions include raising an alarm, prohibiting entry (e.g. locking a door before object able to enter area), notifying an individual, allowing entry (e.g., unlocking a door), turning on lights, turning on video recording device, and a selection of the days and/or times when the action is performed. At step 630, the registered object (e.g., the object’s unique identifier), the area identifiers, and the action identifiers are stored along with any scheduling information that pertains to the action being performed are stored in registered object monitor settings data store 635. A determination is made as to whether there are more monitor settings to establish for registered objects (decision 640). If there are more settings to establish for registered objects, then decision 640 branches to “yes” branch 645 which loops back to select the next registered object. This looping continues until there are no further settings to establish for registered objects, at which point decision 640 branches to “no” branch 655.

Steps 660 to 680 are used to establish monitor settings for unregistered objects. At step 660, one or monitored areas are selected from monitored areas data store 615. At step 665, the user selects one or more actions to perform when an unregistered object enters the selected areas. These actions are selected from actions data store 625. For security purposes, for example, the entire premises can be set to alarm if an unregistered entity is present after a particular time (e.g., after 10:00 pm). In this manner, registered objects, such as family members, could walk about the premises without raising an alarm, but an unregistered object would cause an alarm to sound. At step 670, the unregistered object settings are stored. The monitored area identifiers, and the action identifiers are stored along with any scheduling information that pertains to the action being performed are stored in unregistered object monitor settings data store 675. A determination is made as to whether there are more monitor settings to establish for unregistered objects (decision 680). If there are more settings to establish for unregistered objects, then decision 680 branches to “yes” branch 685 which loops back to select the next registered object. This looping continues until there are no further settings to establish for registered objects, at which point decision 680 branches to “no” branch 690 whereupon the configuration of monitor settings ends at 695.

FIG. 7 is a flowchart showing steps taken to activate monitoring of entities detected on the multi-touch floor covering. Processing commences at 700 whereupon, at step 710 the desired registered object monitor settings are selected from registered entity monitor settings data store 635 and at step 730 the desired unregistered object monitor settings are selected from unregistered entity monitor settings data store 675. These selected monitor settings are stored in active monitor settings memory area 720. The active monitor settings includes the registered objects and the respective actions to perform, and the unregistered objects and the respective actions to perform. In addition, at step 740, group monitor settings are selected from group monitor data store 750. Group monitor settings include quantity thresholds, and actions to take when the thresholds are reached or exceeded. For example, when the parents are away, a group quantity threshold could be set to six individuals so that if the parents’ teenage children have a party with more than six individuals, an action (e.g., telephone the parents cell phone) can be taken alerting the parents of the party taking place at the residence. The selected group monitor settings are also stored in active monitor settings memory area 720.

At predefined process 760, the system monitors the premises (e.g., the area covered by the electronic multi-touch floor covering) and performs actions as needed. Periodically, the system checks if changes are being requested to the active settings (decision 770). If a change is being requested, decision 770 branches to “yes” branch 774 which loops back to receive the changes to the active monitor settings. On the other hand, if there is no change requested to the active monitor settings, then decision 770 branches to “no” branch 778. A determination is made as to whether an authorized user (e.g., a user presenting valid authentication data, such as a userid/password) is requesting to halt the monitoring (decision 780). If monitoring is not being stopped, then decision 780 branches to “no” branch 784 which loops back to continue monitoring the premises using the electronic multi-touch floor covering. On the other hand, if an authorized user requests a halt to the monitoring, then decision 780 branches to “yes” branch 788 whereupon active monitoring processing ends at 795.

FIG. 8 is a flowchart showing steps taken by the multi-touch floor covering system to identify and monitor the presence of entities. Processing commences at 800 whereupon, at step 805, an object count is initialized (e.g., set to zero). The object count is used to count the number of objects at the premises (on the electronic multi-touch floor covering). At step 810, a first contact shape, such as a shoe, foot, paw, etc., is identified for a first object, such as an adult, child, pet, etc. At step 815, the weight of the object is sensed using the scale sensors built into the electronic multi-touch floor covering. At step 820, the contact shape of the object and the weight of the object are compared with the shapes and weights of registered objects stored in registered objects data store 560.

At predefined process 825, actions are identified that should be taken based upon the object that was sensed (see FIG. 9 and corresponding text for processing details). For example, if the object is not a registered object and the weight falls in the range of a possible teenage or adult intruder (e.g., over one hundred pounds, etc.), then intrusion-type actions can be taken, such as sounding an alarm or contacting police or other law enforcement. On the other hand, if the object is a child and the child is in an off-limits location, such as near a possibly dangerous item (e.g., a hot tub, pool, stove, etc.), then the action could be to alert a caretaker, such as a parent or guardian, so that the child can be moved to a safer location away from the dangerous item. Likewise, if the object is identified as a registered object based upon the contact shape and weight of the object, such as an adult living at the premises, then appropriate actions can be taken, such as not identifying the person as a possible intruder, notifying others, such as a spouse, that the person is on the premises, and performing any automation actions, such as turning on lights or unlocking doors, etc.

At step 830, the object counter is incremented (e.g., set to one when the first object is identified). A determination is made as to whether more objects are sensed on the electronic multi-touch floor covering installed in the premises (decision 835). If more objects are sensed, then decision 835 branches to “yes” branch 840 which loops back to identify the next object using steps 810 to 820, take any actions for the next identified object (predefined process 825) and increment the group counter (step 830). This looping continues until all of the objects sensed on the electronic multi-touch floor covering have been processed, at which point decision 835 branches to “no” branch 855.

A determination is made as to whether the number of objects sensed on the electronic multi-touch floor covering exceeds any thresholds included in active monitor settings memory area 720 (decision 860). If the number of objects exceeds any such thresholds, then decision 860 branches to “yes” branch 865 whereupon, at step 870, any active group actions that correspond to the counter value are performed. On the other hand, if the counter does not meet or exceed any group thresholds, then decision 860 branches to “no” branch 875 bypassing step 870. Processing then returns to the calling routine (e.g., the steps shown in FIG. 7) at 895.

FIG. 9 is a flowchart showing steps taken by the system to identify actions to take when a particular entity is identified. Processing commences at 900 whereupon, at step 905, the current time and date (timestamp) are retrieved from the computer system. Previously (see, e.g., FIG. 8, step 820), the object’s contact shape and weight was compared to known (registered) objects. A determination is made as to whether, based upon the comparison, the object currently sensed matches a registered object (decision 910). If the object currently being sensed by the electronic multi-touch floor covering matches one of the registered objects, then decision 910 branches to “yes” branch 915 whereupon, at step 920, a schedule (if any is available) corresponding to the registered object is retrieved from registered objects data store 560 and, if a schedule is found for the registered entity, the object’s scheduled location is found for the current timestamp. A determination is made as to whether the registered object is currently scheduled to be present at the premises (decision 925). If the object is not scheduled to be at the premises, then decision 925 branches to “no” branch 930. In one embodiment, at step 940, the object is treated as an unregistered object and active monitor settings (actions) are retrieved for such an unregistered object and performed accordingly (e.g., sound alarm, etc.). However, in another embodiment, an action is performed that requests that the person confirm his or her identity so that the active monitor settings can be retrieved and used (e.g., when a person arrives home early from work due to illness, etc.). Returning to decision 925, if the registered object (e.g., person) is scheduled to be present at the premises at the current time, then decision 925 branches to “yes” branch 945 whereupon, at step 950, the active monitor settings (actions) corresponding to the registered object are retrieved from active monitor settings memory area 720 according to the current timestamp. Returning to decision 910, if the object sensed by the electronic multi-touch floor covering does not match any of the registered objects, then decision 910 branches to “no” branch 935 whereupon, at step 940, any active monitor settings (actions) used for unregistered objects at the current time and date are retrieved from active monitor settings memory area 720.

After any applicable settings (actions) have been retrieved for the object (either registered or unregistered), the actions are preformed by the system at step 955 (e.g., sound an alarm for unregistered object, turn on lights or unlock doors for registered object, etc.). In one embodiment, at step 960, object inactivity is sensed, such as a person lying prone on the floor. In one embodiment, also at step 960, the current health status of the object is retrieved, if possible, such as using a heart-rate monitor or other such device. A determination is made, based on the data received in step 960, as to whether the object might need assistance (decision 965). For example, an elderly person may have fallen on the floor and cannot get up or a person may have suffered a heart attack or other possibly life-threatening incident. If a health alert is detected, then decision 965 branches to “yes” branch 970 whereupon, at step 975 appropriate action is taken (e.g., contact emergency medical services (EMS), sound alarm, notify a caretaker, etc.). On the other hand, if no health alert is detected, then decision 965 branches to “no” branch 980 and processing returns to the calling routine (see, e.g., FIG. 8) at 995.

One of the preferred implementations of the invention is a client application, namely, a set of instructions (program code) or other functional descriptive material in a code module that may, for example, be resident in the random access memory of the computer. Until required by the computer, the set of instructions may be stored in another computer memory, for example, in a hard disk drive, or in a removable memory such as an optical disk (for eventual use in a CD ROM) or floppy disk (for eventual use in a floppy disk drive), or downloaded via the Internet or other computer network. Thus, the present invention may be implemented as a computer program product for use in a computer. In addition, although the various methods described are conveniently implemented in a general purpose computer selectively activated or reconfigured by software, one of ordinary skill in the art would also recognize that such methods may be carried out in hardware, in firmware, or in more specialized apparatus constructed to perform the required method steps. Functional descriptive material is information that imparts functionality to a machine. Functional descriptive material includes, but is not limited to, computer programs, instructions, rules, facts, definitions of computable functions, objects, and data structures.

While particular embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that, based upon the teachings herein, that changes and modifications may be made without departing from this invention and its broader aspects. Therefore, the appended claims are to encompass within their scope all such changes and modifications as are within the true spirit and scope of this invention. Furthermore, it is to be understood that the invention is solely defined by the appended claims. It will be understood by those with skill in the art that if a specific number of an introduced claim element is intended, such intent will be explicitly recited in the claim, and in the absence of such recitation no such limitation is present. For non-limiting example, as an aid to understanding, the following appended claims contain usage of the introductory phrases “at least one” and “one or more” to introduce claim elements. However, the use of such phrases should not be construed to imply that the introduction of a claim element by the indefinite articles “a” or “an” limits any particular claim containing such introduced claim element to inventions containing only one such element, even when the same claim includes the introductory phrases “one or more” or “at least one” and indefinite articles such as “a” or “an”; the same holds true for the use in the claims of definite articles.

Source : http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/

www.nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&d=PALL&S1=08138882&OS=PN/08138882&RS=PN/08138882

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In Study, Peripheral IV Catheter Shows Promise in Intravenous Therapy

In Study, Peripheral IV Catheter Shows Promise in Intravenous Therapy

In Study, Peripheral IV Catheter Shows Promise in Intravenous Therapy

Background and Significance: Many hospitalized patients require an intravenous (IV) catheter to maintain vascular ac-­ cess or for administration of fluids and medications. The best approach to attaining peripheral intravenous (PIV) access for long term therapy is unknown, particularly in patients with a history of difficult IV placement.

Purpose: To measure clinical outcomes using a Modified Seldinger Technique (MST) with ultrasound (US) guidance to achieve and maintain PIV for long term IV therapy.

Methods: Subjects were patients with a history of difficult peripheral intravenous catheter placement and need for IV therapy longer than 72 hours. Modified Seldinger Technique was used with US guidance to place all PIVs in the deep veins of the upper extremities.

Results: A convenience sample of 157 subjects was enrolled in the study. Mean dwell time for catheter duration was seven days. First attempt placement success was 95%, 88.5% of patients had completion of IV therapy, and a low overall com-­ plication rate (9.57/1000 catheter days).

Conclusion: Using MST for access for long term PIV therapy was associated with low complications and effective in our study population. Using MST requires specialized knowledge and skills, including the use of US and specialized insertion techniques. In patients who require extended PIV therapy with a history of difficult IV placement, this type of insertion technique may have benefit.

Accelerated Seldinger Technique*:

Accelerated Seldinger Technique (AST)

Passive Needlestick safety

Designed to reduce risk of bleeding, air embolism, contamination, guidewire embolism, loss of cannulation

“Fast-flash” for earlier detection of vessel entry

Extended Dwell Catheter:

Highest completion of therapy, lowest complicationof any VAD*

Certified for up to 300psi (5cc/sec) power injections

Up to 29 days allowable dwell time (per FDA clearance)

Blood drawable

An extended dwell peripheral IV catheter (80mm long), the 300 psi (5cc/sec) POWERWAND with built-in StatLock® compatibility establishes a new standard for power-injectable vascular access. Inserted using The WAND’s Accelerated Seldinger Technique (AST), the POWERWAND offers a faster, safer and simpler approach to peripheral intravenous catheterization.

Researchers said the FDA-cleared POWERWAND was successfully placed on first

attempt 95% of the time, in a challenging population of patients with a history of difficult IV

access. There was also a highly favorable rate of IV therapy completion — 88.5% of cases.

Researchers said the FDA-cleared POWERWAND was successfully placed on first

attempt 95% of the time, in a challenging population of patients with a history of difficult IV

access. There was also a highly favorable rate of IV therapy completion — 88.5% of cases.

Source : http://www.avainfo.org/website/catalogitem.asp?id=280940

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Philips’ ErgoSensor Monitor Tells You to Stop Slouching

Philips’ ErgoSensor Monitor Tells You to Stop Slouching

Philips’ ErgoSensor Monitor Tells You to Stop Slouching

ErgoSensor for ultimate ergonomics

ErgoSensor for a healthier way of working

Saves up to 80% energy costs

Optimal viewing distance measurement and advice

Time-break reminder

Neck posture detection and corrective advice

Sustainable Eco-design

65% post consumer recycled plastics with TCO Edge

PVC-BFR free housing

Zero power consumption with 0 watt hard switch

Designed for people

SmartErgoBase enables user-friendly ergonomic adjustments

Low bezel-to-table height for maximum reading comfort

Easy to experience

SmartImage presets for easy optimised image settings

Features

ErgoSensor for a healthier way of working

It is Philips firm belief that work should be suited to people, and not the other way around. To promote a healthier and productive workplace, Philips has developed the world’s first innovative technology called “ErgoSensor”, which is embedded in the monitor to sense and measure the user’s behaviour. ErgoSensor advises users on how to sit in an ergonomic position at their computer with a corrective feedback on optimal viewing distance, ergonomic neck angle and a time break advice. It also saves up to 80% energy consumption if user is not present on the seat by powering off the monitor.

SmartImage presets for easy optimised image settings

SmartImage is an exclusive leading edge Philips technology that analyses the content displayed on your screen and optimises your display performance. This user-friendly interface allows you to select various modes, like Office, Photo, Movie, Game, Economy etc., to fit the application in use. Based on the selection, SmartImage dynamically optimises the contrast, colour saturation and sharpness of images and videos for ultimate display performance. The Economy mode option offers you major power savings. All in real time at the touch of a single button!

SmartErgoBase enables user-friendly ergonomic adjustments

The SmartErgoBase is a monitor base that delivers ergonomic display comfort and provides cable management. The user-friendly height, swivel, tilt and rotation angle adjustments of the base allow the monitor to be positioned for maximum comfort to help ease the physical strains of a long workday. In addition, cable management reduces cable clutter and keeps the workspace neat and professional.

SmartErgoBase

TCO Edge

65% post consumer recycled plastics with TCO Edge

TCO Edge certification is given to products that go beyond existing eco-labelling programmes. Over and above standard TCO requirements, it further mandates that the product uses a minimum of 65% post-consumer recycled plastics, is energy efficient, uses minimal hazardous materials, has 100% recyclable packaging and, amongst other requirements, is designed for easy recycling. You can rest assured that this Philips monitor is a cutting edge technology product, which is best in class ICT, benefitting you and the planet while helping you make a responsible green IT purchase!

Zero power consumption with 0 watt hard switch

At the flick of the 0 watt hard switch, which is conveniently located at the back of the monitor, you can completely cut off your monitor from AC power. This results in zero power consumption, reducing your carbon footprint even further

Remember those halcyon days when your mother would chide you to sit up straight should you ever start to slouch? Good news, desk jockeys, because Philips’ ErgoSensor desktop monitor is here to stop your stooping now that mom’s no longer around — and it doesn’t require you to wear some silly plastic pendant or occupy any of your USB real estate. The 24-inch, 250-nit, 1920 x 1080 display has a sensor in its bezel that watches you while you work, and warns you when your posture becomes poor or if you’ve been staring at the screen too long. It also informs users how to set up the monitor for optimal viewing distance and ergonomic position. Plus, it can tell when you’re not around and shut the screen off to conserve power. We don’t know how much money the monitor will cost or even when it’ll be available to fix your poor sitting form, but we do know you can learn everything else about it at the source below.

Improper ergonomics at your workstation can lead to a potential bevy of workplace related injuries, including back and neck pain, eyestrain, and carpal Philips ErgoSensor diagram Philips ErgoSensor Monitor Tells You to Stop Slouchingtunnel syndrome. Realizing that “work should be suited to people, and not the other way around”, Philips has released an interesting new 24? LCD monitor. Besides being an all-around nice display to have at your workstation, the new monitor has a built-in “ErgoSensor” to promote better ergonomics.

Located in the top bezel of the display where a standard webcam would usually be found, the ErgoSensor is able to track the user’s position and distance from the monitor and provide feedback if the person is not in an ergonomically correct position, for example, if someone is sitting too close to the screen or their neck posture is incorrect. When such feedback occurs, the user can reposition him or herself, or can adjust the display using a number of adjustments in the monitor’s “SmartErgoBase”.

The ErgoSensor Monitor also has a built-in time-break reminder feature so you’ll know when to rest your eyes to avoid eyestrain. And you’ll be saving energy too, because the ErgoSensor also detects whether a user is in front of the screen, and will shut down the screen to conserve power when you’re away.

source : http://www.philips.co.uk/c/pc-monitor/brilliance-p-line-24-inch-61-cm-full-hd-display-241p4lryeb_00/

www.prd/;jsessionid=48CC800E36716ED1B800E65FB3094F8E.app101-drp2

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Euclid Tier 1 Mini Access System for Precise Needle Placement Cleared in U.S.

Euclid Tier 1 Mini Access System for Precise Needle Placement Cleared in U.S.

Euclid Tier 1 Mini Access System for Precise Needle Placement Cleared in U.S.

The Euclid™ Tier 1 Mini Access System is designed to access and/or place a Guidewire into a vessel located 5 mm to 60 mm below the skin surface. The system is a portable, hand operated, and used in conjunction with a commercially available Ultrasound Imaging System. When coupled, the user has the ability to accurately locate, determine the depth, and insert a Needle and Guidewire into the selected vessel. The ultrasound image enables the user to determine whether or not the Guidewire is placed correctly within the vessel.

HOUSTON, March 5, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Houston Medical Robotics, Inc. announces that it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration 510(k) clearance to market the Euclid™ Tier 1 Mini Access System. The Euclid™ Tier 1 Mini Access System is a portable, hand-held device that integrates commercially available ultrasound imaging systems to facilitate placement of a needle and guidewire into a targeted anatomical location for a variety of therapeutics applications.

“Although numerous applications have been identified, our initial target for the Euclid™ Tier 1 Mini Access System is reducing complications associated with central venous catheter (CVC) placement,” stated Jeffery J. Sheldon, Houston Medical Robotics, Inc. Chairman & CEO. “With over 5 million CVCs placed each year – and published complication rates are as high as 26% – we are poised to make a significant impact on healthcare outcomes,” stated Mr. Sheldon.

Technology limitations, inadequate procedure training & exposure, and varying patient size & morphology have all been identified as co-contributors to the high CVC placement complication rates. Use of ultrasound imaging during procedures has been shown to reduce complications; however, the procedure is cumbersome and generally requires additional assistance. “The Euclid™ Tier 1 Mini Access System places all the necessary tools and consumables readily at hand for single-operator safe, effective, rapid, and cost-effective access,” stated Mr. Sheldon.

About Houston Medical Robotics, Inc.

Houston Medical Robotics, Inc. develops & commercializes revolutionary image guided hand-held medical robotics for use in various therapeutic applications. The devices provide safer, cheaper, and more effective procedure alternatives, thereby increasing caregiver efficiency, hospital & clinic revenue, and overall patient satisfaction. Houston Medical Robotics, Inc. raised $2.2 million from CitareTx Investment Partners I, LP, a Texas based medical device investment fund and business incubator, also founded and managed by Mr. Sheldon.

Texas-based Houston Medical Robotics received FDA clearance for its Euclid Tier 1 Mini Access System, which looks like a sextant for central venous catheter placement.

It provides a depth scale to adjust where you want it to go and fits standard ultrasound transducers for watching where the needle is heading.

The Euclid™ Tier 1 Mini Access System is designed to access and/or place a Guidewire into a vessel located 5 mm to 60 mm below the skin surface. The system is a portable, hand operated, and used in conjunction with a commercially available Ultrasound Imaging System. When coupled, the user has the ability to accurately locate, determine the depth, and insert a Needle and Guidewire into the selected vessel. The ultrasound image enables the user to determine whether or not the Guidewire is placed correctly within the vessel.

Source : http://www.bizjournals.com/prnewswire/press_releases/2012/03/05/DA64746

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A Match Made in NEJM: iPad App Review

A Match Made in NEJM: iPad App Review

A Match Made in NEJM: iPad App Review

Thanks to a newly built software application (or “app”), the Journal can now be downloaded and read in an issue format on the iPad. The NEJM iPad Edition is now available in the iTunes App Store at no charge. The issue of February 23, 2012, is free, so that readers can see how an issue looks, works, and reads on their iPads. The app is designed as an issue-based reader, meaning that it allows downloads of the full text of single issues, including figures and tables, beginning with the first issue of 2012.

Learning to navigate easily within and between articles and to the table of contents and extra features takes only a little practice. The app allows the reader to change the text size and to bookmark articles, add and save notes, e-mail articles, and even share articles on Facebook and Twitter. Readers can search both within an issue and across all the issues that have been downloaded to their device. The app includes an article feed for direct access to all articles published online first.

In addition to the full text of the articles in an issue, the iPad Edition includes the audio summary, audio interviews, and the full-text audio for Clinical Practice articles. New Videos in Clinical Medicine can be viewed, as can the questions in each issue for continuing medical education credit. The slide sets of figures and tables can be displayed on the iPad, and there are links to supplementary content. Because of technical restrictions imposed by the device makers and software developers, our interactive graphics, the Interactive Medical Cases, and supplemental videos are not available in the iPad Edition, since they do not work on the device. We hope to find ways to make these features available in the future. We also hope to adapt the app for use with other tablet computer formats that our subscribers are using.

The app has been launched with all issues published so far in 2012, our 200th anniversary year. Individual subscribers to the Journal can log on to the new iPad app using the same username and password that they use at NEJM.org. In other words, the subscriber’s current password works for both the website and the iPad app. Each subscriber’s access to issues within the app is tied to the term of the subscription. Through iTunes, nonsubscribers can purchase an iPad-only monthly subscription, but subscriptions purchased through Apple’s iTunes Store give access only to new issues as they become available on the iPad and not to full content on our website.

For decades, computers have been changing how we work, think, read, and communicate. It was just 2 years ago that the major new tablet computers became available. Already they are accelerating the changes in communication and learning in the medical world — once a world defined largely on paper. Now we are in a hybrid environment with an exciting, sometimes dizzying, array of options for digital information delivery. We strive to deliver the Journal in as many ways and on as many devices and platforms as are needed. For now, we invite readers who use the iPad to try the new app. As always, feedback is welcome, and additional future innovations are certain.

This year marks the Bicentennial of The New England Journal of Medicine. As the “oldest continuously published medical journal in the world,” NEJM has heralded many great discoveries and advances in medicine within its veneratble pages: to name a few, the first use of surgical anesthesia (1846), the first description of chemotherapy (1948), and the first application of targeted molecular therapies for cancer (2001). Now these and future announcements will be available in an unprecedented form, because on its 200th anniversary NEJM transformed its ink into pixels and its paper into iOS by introducing the NEJM iPad App.

NEJM provided their iPad App to Medgadget for review, and overall we like what see. The following is the breakdown:

Ease of use: Even though the iPad has been lauded for its singular ease of use, the same cannot be said for many of its apps. Fortunately NEJM is not one of those apps – they nailed it by creating a very intuitive interface. The welcome screen is the Store with thumbnails of each of NEJM‘s weekly issues that can be simply previewed and downloaded (free to existing subscribers; $14.99/month, or $5.99/issue; one free fully functional issue). There are also quick link buttons that allow users to change font size, bookmark articles of interest, or search the entire issue or one’s whole issue library for specific terms. Hopefully the ease of use is a first baby step to bringing nontraditional readers to the journal.

fj24084f84fff A Match Made in NEJM: iPad App Review

Readability: Do not worry, traditionalists! The overall formatting style of the NEJM app resembles that of the print issue (and online articles). One key advantage though is that the journal is interactive, and one can find the definition of many words, such as “embolism,” by simply highlighting them. That being said, the feature has a lot more potential and we hope that NEJM makes a step towards improving it. For example, certain medically relevant word phrases such as “tachyarrhtyhmias” and “hazard ratio” cannot currently be looked up using the app. Also, though it makes for easy reading that the tables and figures are set off to the side and can be expanded if desired, we wish that each table/figure was at least in line with the paragraph that refers to it. Scrolling up and down an article is not continuous but rather discreet, sort of like turning a page, and one can inadvertently slide to the previous or following article with too quick a side stroke. On the plus side, endnote numbers are hyperlinked and when clicked pop up the reference rather than move the page, thereby allowing for easy browsing. Eventually, we hope that the references themselves will be hyperlinked and browsable in-app so that one can read related abstracts if so desired.

Social- and Multimedia: The NEJM iPad App features a number of bells and whistles that integrate with modern media. In addition to the traditional article sharing via e-mail, the iPad App now makes it easy to link papers of interest to Facebook and Twitter (though it would also be nice to have an optionally visible comment feed below each article). One can also add personal notes to each article, which can then be e-mailed for long term retention. Speaking of e-mail, the corresponding author’s e-mail is hyperlinked for easy in-app e-mailing should one want to reach out.

The coolest multimedia features, however, have to do with the audio and images. If one is in a multitasking mood, he or she can listen to the 15-30 minute audio summary for a particular issue while browsing through the articles. Furthermore, the iPad interface allows for better interaction with images. For example, there is an amazingly detailed chest X-ray film in the March 15, 2012 issue that clearly shows the left lung bronchiole tree due to the patient having accidentally aspirated barium. In the print or online issue it would not be possible or as easy to interact with the image by, for example, magnifying it. It actually feels as if you’re holding the film in your own hand!

Overall: If you enjoy keeping up to date with groundbreaking medical news (which we know you do, given that you’re on Medgadget) it’s worth your while to check out the NEJM iPad App. Browse the free trial issue to see if you like it. They’ve enhanced the reader experience, particularly with regards to social media and multimedia, though admittedly there is room for improvement given that is version 1.0.1. We look forward to seeing what the next versions will look like!

Source : http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe1201837

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