Archive for September 26th, 2012

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Toyota’s Human Support Robot to Help Patients Stuck in Bed at Home

Toyota’s Human Support Robot to Help Patients Stuck in Bed at Home

Toyota’s Human Support Robot to Help Patients Stuck in Bed at Home

Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) to support the activities of people as one of the “Toyota Partner Robot”, for those who are crippled, and life support to assist independent living in the home was developed: (short for human support robot HSR) robot.

By body size and weight of the cylindrical spicy maneuverability, an arm of folding, HSR is on his shelf “” pick up, the desk to suck “pick up grabbing something on the floor” “something thin It is a robot that can do the job, such as “open the curtains” “fetch things from a high place. The operation can be performed easily by using the voice recognition function and tablets. In addition, we are designed to be touching the person, so it can be used to care safely and securely, so as not to cause a major force driving the body and arm.

Aims to contribute to the maintenance and improvement of quality of life (QOL), in cooperation with Association of Japan service dog, the development of HSR, the punch line, “I understand the needs and desires of people crippled I’ve been working on the development of a feature called “Communication with family and caregivers” “fetch things” “I pick up things. Cooperation of the Yokohama Rehabilitation Center, we conducted experiments for disabled with HSR at home of persons, in 2011, he has been developing with feedback to the design point of view of the user.

Given the challenges of the aging society, including the development of new features that can be assisted and watched from a remote location using the HSR, the future, health care professionals, nursing and research institutions aiming at practical use, and other university I will work to research and development in conjunction with such.

In addition, the Tokyo International Exhibition Center (Friday) September 28 (Wednesday) September 26: will be held at (commonly known as Tokyo Big Sight, Ariake, Koto) welfare “special project HCR2012 HCR 39th” we plan to reference exhibit of HSR to “” forefront equipment development.

Toyota has unveiled a new assistant robot designed to help the disabled live more independently. Called the Human Support Robot (HSR), it represents the latest initiative in Toyota’s Partner Robot program and is intended to help out around the home by fetching things, opening curtains, and picking up objects that have fallen to the floor.

Toyota has unveiled a new robot that was designed to help bed ridden patients do basic tasks around the house. Toyota Human Support Robot 4 Toyotas Human Support Robot to Help Patients Stuck in Bed at HomeThe Human Support Robot can pick up things from shelves or off the floor and bring them to the patient. It can open and close curtains and can be programmed other similar tasks. It’s not clear how dextrous it is and how well it can pick up oddly shaped things seeing how it only has one arm to work with.

An interesting part of the robot is the interface, which works either through voice commands or by the user controlling it through a tablet. Toyota is still quiet on the full feature set of the new robot, which is probably an early development version of a future device. Nevertheless, though it might still look too big and clunky, it can perform the most important job for a patient stuck in bed at home, which of course is to bring over the TV remote.

source : http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=auto&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww2.toyota.co.jp%2Fjp%2Fnews%2F12%2F09%2Fnt12_051.html

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Lab-on-a-Bead Technology for Rapid Disease Detection

Lab-on-a-Bead Technology for Rapid Disease Detection

Lab-on-a-Bead Technology for Rapid Disease Detection

If you throw a ball underwater, you’ll find that the smaller it is, the faster it moves: A larger cross-section greatly increases the water’s resistance. Now, a team of MIT researchers has figured out a way to use this basic principle, on a microscopic scale, to carry out biomedical tests that could eventually lead to fast, compact and versatile medical-testing devices.

The results, based on work by graduate student Elizabeth Rapoport and assistant professor Geoffrey Beach, of MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE), are described in a paper published in the journal Lab on a Chip. MIT graduate student Daniel Montana ’11 also contributed to the research as an undergraduate.

The balls used here are microscopic magnetic beads that can be “decorated” with biomolecules such as antibodies that cause them to bind to specific proteins or cells; such beads are widely used in biomedical research. The key to this new work was finding a way to capture individual beads and set them oscillating by applying a variable magnetic field. The rate of their oscillation can then be measured to assess the size of the beads.

When these beads are placed in a biological sample, biomolecules attach to their surfaces, making the beads larger — a change that can then be detected through the biomolecules effect on the beads’ oscillation. This would provide a way to detect exactly how much of a target biomolecule is present in a sample, and provide a way to give a virtually instantaneous electronic readout of that information.

This new technique, for the first time, allows these beads — each about one micrometer, or millionth of a meter, in diameter — to be used for precise measurements of tiny quantities of materials. This could, for example, lead to tests for disease agents that would need just a tiny droplet of blood and could deliver results instantly, instead of requiring laboratory analysis.

In a paper published earlier this year in the journal Applied Physics Letters, the same MIT researchers described their development of a technique for creating magnetic tracks on a microchip surface, and rapidly transporting beads along those tracks. (The technology required is similar to that used to read and write magnetic data on a computer’s hard disk.) An operational device using this new approach would consist of a small reservoir above the tracks, where the liquid containing the magnetic beads and the biological sample would be placed.

Rather than pumping the fluid and the particles through channels, as in today’s microfluidic devices, the particles would be controlled entirely through changes in applied magnetic fields. By controlling the directions of magnetic fields in closely spaced adjacent regions, the researchers create tiny areas with extremely strong magnetic fields, called magnetic domain walls, whose position can be shifted along the track. “We can use the magnetic domain walls to capture and transport the beads along the tracks,” Beach says.

In the researchers’ most recent paper, Rapoport explains, they have now shown that once a bead is captured, a magnetic field can be used to shake it back and forth. Then, the researchers measure how fast the bead moves as they change the frequency of the oscillation. “The resonant frequency is a function of the bead size,” she says — and could be used to reveal whether the bead has grown in size through attachment to a target biomolecule.

Besides being potentially quicker and requiring a far smaller biological sample to produce a result, such a device would be more flexible than existing chip-based biomedical tests, the researchers say. While most such devices are specifically designed to detect one particular kind of protein or disease agent, this new device could be used for a wide variety of different tests, simply by inserting a fresh batch of fluid containing beads coated with the appropriate reactant. After the test, the material could be flushed out, and the same chip used for a completely different test by inserting a different type of magnetic beads. “You’d just use it, wash it off, and use it again,” Rapoport says.

There are dozens of types of magnetic beads commercially available now, which can be coated to react with many different biological materials, Beach explains, so such a test device could have enormous flexibility.

The MIT team has not yet used the system to detect biological molecules. Rather, they used magnetic beads of different sizes to demonstrate that their system is capable of detecting size differences corresponding to those between particles that are bound to biological molecules and those that are not. Having succeeded in this proof of concept, the researchers’ next step will be to repeat the experiment using biological samples.

“We now have all the elements required to make a sensing device,” Beach says. The next step is to combine the pieces in an operational device and demonstrate its performance.

R. Sooryakumar, a professor of physics at Ohio State University who was not involved in this research, calls this an “innovative approach.”

“It is very interesting how the researchers combine technologies that are well understood for applications in computing and data storage, and apply them to something completely different,” Sooryakumar says. He adds, “These magnetic devices are potentially valuable tools that could go well beyond how one may normally expect them to be used. The ramifications, for example in food safety and health care, such as pathogen or cancer detection, are indeed exciting.”

An integrated platform for the capture, transport, and detection of individual superparamagnetic microbeads is described for lab-on-a-chip biomedical applications. Magnetic domain walls in magnetic tracks have previously been shown to be capable of capturing and transporting individual beads through a fluid at high speeds. Here it is shown that the strong magnetostatic interaction between a bead and a domain wall leads to a distinct magneto-mechanical resonance that reflects the susceptibility and hydrodynamic size of the trapped bead. Numerical and analytical modeling is used to quantitatively explain this resonance, and the magneto-mechanical resonant response under sinusoidal drive is experimentally characterized both optically and electrically. The observed bead resonance presents a new mechanism for microbead sensing and metrology. The dual functionality of domain walls as both bead carriers and sensors is a promising platform for the development of lab-on-a-bead technologies.

Researchers at MIT have developed a new way to measure the mass of individual particles using tiny superparamagnetic beads, a technology that will hopefully lead to cheap and portable point-of-care diagnostic devices. The trick relies on using an oscillating magnetic field to make individual beads resonate . The frequency of the field that makes a bead resonate the most is proportional to the mass of the bead.

The team used magnetic walls within magnetic tracks to resonate the beads. By attaching antibodies to the beads that attract specific pathogens, they can measure the difference between the resonant frequency of the bead with and without the new particle and therefore derive its mass.

From MIT’s news room:

An operational device using this new approach would consist of a small reservoir above the tracks, where the liquid containing the magnetic beads and the biological sample would be placed.

Rather than pumping the fluid and the particles through channels, as in today’s microfluidic devices, the particles would be controlled entirely through changes in applied magnetic fields. By controlling the directions of magnetic fields in closely spaced adjacent regions, the researchers create tiny areas with extremely strong magnetic fields, called magnetic domain walls, whose position can be shifted along the track.

Besides being potentially quicker and requiring a far smaller biological sample to produce a result, such a device would be more flexible than existing chip-based biomedical tests, the researchers say. While most such devices are specifically designed to detect one particular kind of protein or disease agent, this new device could be used for a wide variety of different tests, simply by inserting a fresh batch of fluid containing beads coated with the appropriate reactant. After the test, the material could be flushed out, and the same chip used for a completely different test by inserting a different type of magnetic beads.

Source : http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/magnetic-beads-lab-on-a-chip-0925.html

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Automatic Sperm Extractor for Automatic Sperm Extraction (video)

Automatic Sperm Extractor for Automatic Sperm Extraction (video)

Automatic Sperm Extractor for Automatic Sperm Extraction (video)

Chinese hospitals are introducing a new machine which can extract sperm for donors.

According to China’s Weibo social platform the automatic sperm extractors are being introduced in a Nanjing hospital, capital of Jiangsu province.

The pink, grey and white machine has a massage pipe at the front which apparently can be adjusted according to the height of its user.

New experience: A visitor explores the machine at an exhibition, left. The small screen, right, also plays films for the user

Speed, frequency, amplitude and temperature are also controllable.

It has a small screen on the top which plays films for the user to help them with the extraction process.

The director of the urology department at Zhengzhou Central Hospital said the machine was being used by infertility patients who are finding it difficult to retrieve sperm the old fashioned way.

A website which is selling the machine for $2,800 promoting it stating ‘it can give patients very comfortable feeling.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2206613/Chinese-hospitals-introduce-hands-free-automatic-sperm-extractor-donors-play-videos-help.html#ixzz27Xeo8dSi

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There appear to be problems within the Chinese society, as exhibited by a new $2,800 device being introduced to a hospital in Nanjing that helps to automate the extraction of sperm for donation. In America, due to an apparent glut of sperm, such technology would probably be used to help quadriplegics, but in China it’s designed for infertility patients that would prefer to be aroused by the machine.

According to the Daily Mail, the director of the urology department at Zhengzhou Central Hospital believes this is a more comfortable option for some patients over the “old fashioned” method. The device’s operating nozzle adjusts to proper height, is temperature controlled, and will undulate at the desired speed for a desired effect. Most helpful is the built-in screen that can play the viewing material of your choice.

There appear to be problems within the Chinese society, as exhibited by a new $2,800 device being introduced to a hospital in Nanjing that helps to automate the extraction of sperm for donation. In America, due to an apparent glut of sperm, such technology would probably be used to help quadriplegics, but in China it’s designed for infertility patients that would prefer to be aroused by the machine.

According to the Daily Mail, the director of the urology department at Zhengzhou Central Hospital believes this is a more comfortable option for some patients over the “old fashioned” method. The device’s operating nozzle adjusts to proper height, is temperature controlled, and will undulate at the desired speed for a desired effect. Most helpful is the built-in screen that can play the viewing material of your choice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXs3g56SNCk&feature=player_embedded

Source : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2206613/Chinese-hospitals-introduce-hands-free-automatic-sperm-extractor-donors-play-videos-help.html

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Zamzee Tackles Childhood Obesity: Interview with CEO Lance Henderson

Zamzee Tackles Childhood Obesity: Interview with CEO Lance Henderson

Zamzee Tackles Childhood Obesity: Interview with CEO Lance Henderson

New technologies offer the potential to change sedentary behavior among adolescents by tapping into kids’ affinity for digital games. But research on the behavioral and biological impact of such products has been limited, raising the question: Do they really work?

New data announced today by HopeLab show that Zamzee®, a pocket-sized activity meter that connects to a motivational game-based website, increased physical activity levels in kids by 59% over a six-month period and reduced biological risk factors for heart disease and diabetes. These results from a study sponsored by HopeLab and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation were announced September 23 at the 2012 Obesity Society Annual Meeting in San Antonio, Texas.

The randomized, controlled study evaluated the effects of Zamzee, developed by HopeLab, in a diverse sample of 448 middle-school-aged adolescents enrolled from urban, suburban and rural environments across the U.S. Half of the study participants used Zamzee, an activity meter that measures movement using a three-axis accelerometer and uploads physical activity data to a motivational game-based website. The website allows kids to view their activity levels, earn points for movement, achieve goals, and select rewards. The other half of study participants in the control group received a Zamzee activity meter that uploaded physical activity data but had no access to the motivational website.

In the study, kids using the Zamzee activity meter and website showed an average increase in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) of 59% – or approximately 45 additional minutes of MVPA per week – compared to the control group. This impact persisted throughout the six-month study period. Significant increases in physical activity were seen across a number of key groups at risk for sedentary behavior, including a 27% increase in MVPA among overweight participants (BMI >25) and a 103% increase in MVPA among girls.

In addition, study data also showed that Zamzee had a positive effect on key biological factors associated with diseases linked to sedentary behavior. Over six months, participants who used Zamzee showed reduced gains in LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, which is a risk factor for heart disease. Participants who consistently used Zamzee also showed improved blood sugar control (HbA1c), a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

“This study shows that technology is not just part of the problem; it can also be part of the solution in helping kids be more physically active,” said Steve Cole, Ph.D., Vice President of Research and Development at HopeLab and Professor of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. “These results also show that Zamzee can increase physical activity enough to improve some of the key biological processes that underlie the long-term disease risks associated with a sedentary lifestyle.”

Sedentary behavior is a major problem of national importance. There are approximately 20 million tweens and young teens in the U.S., and research shows that sedentary behavior is putting this generation at risk for serious and costly long-term health problems, including obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

In 2010, based on early research indicating the positive impact of Zamzee, HopeLab launched Zamzee as a social enterprise experiment aimed at developing scalable, sustainable ways to distribute Zamzee and increase physical activity in sedentary kids and kids at risk for sedentary behavior. HopeLab continues to partner with Zamzee in ongoing research and distribution activities to support the social mission of the product. The Zamzee product is now available to the public at [http://www.zamzee.com.

“As more and more people discover Zamzee, we consistently hear from kids and families that it’s a fun, engaging way to make physical activity a regular part of their daily lives,” said Lance Henderson, CEO of Zamzee. “These new data show that Zamzee is also an effective way to improve health, which is inspiring to us and our partners as we work to put Zamzee into the hands of kids and families across the U.S.”

About HopeLab

HopeLab is a non-profit organization founded in 2001 by Board Chair Pam Omidyar. HopeLab harnesses the power and appeal of technology to improve the health of young people. HopeLab applies a research-based, customer-focused development model to create products that positively impact health behavior. HopeLab is part of the Omidyar Group philanthropic enterprises. For more information, please visit http://www.hopelab.org.

About Zamzee

Zamzee is a social enterprise on a mission to make it easier for tweens and families to be more physically active. The Zamzee meter and motivational website is the result of several years of research and design based on feedback from kids and families. The Zamzee meter is sold for $29.95; access to the Zamzee website is free of charge. Zamzee was established in 2010 by HopeLab, a nonprofit research organization that uses the power and appeal of technology to improve the health of kids. Initial research and development of Zamzee was conducted by HopeLab, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. For more information, please visit

Most of us know by now that 2 out of 3 adults in the US are overweight or obese. Alarmingly, that figure is 1 out of 3 among children. On the positive side, we’ve reached a stage where technology is transitioning from being the problem (e.g. TV, cars, prepackaged foods) to being the solution (e.g. activity monitors, mHealth, exercise video games). (For a more thorough discussion of this transition, read this author’s NEJM Bicentennial essay).

Medgadget covers a number of innovative tools that may improve healthy lifestyle behaviors, from an augmented reality diet to a device that can monitor vegetable consumption. Most of these tools, such as the Fitbit or Withings weight scale, have been targeted towards adults. An activity monitor called the Zamzee is a new kid (pun intended) on the block that focuses on getting children and teens more active, and the company making it just announced on Monday some impressive results to show that it actually works:

The randomized, controlled study evaluated the effects of Zamzee, developed by HopeLab, in a diverse sample of 448 middle-school-aged adolescents enrolled from urban, suburban and rural environments across the U.S. Half of the study participants used Zamzee, an activity meter that measures movement using a three-axis accelerometer and uploads physical activity data to a motivational game-based website. The website allows kids to view their activity levels, earn points for movement, achieve goals, and select rewards. The other half of study participants in the control group received a Zamzee activity meter that uploaded physical activity data but had no access to the motivational website.

In the study, kids using the Zamzee activity meter and website showed an average increase in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) of 59% – or approximately 45 additional minutes of MVPA per week – compared to the control group. This impact persisted throughout the six-month study period. Significant increases in physical activity were seen across a number of key groups at risk for sedentary behavior, including a 27% increase in MVPA among overweight participants (BMI >25) and a 103% increase in MVPA among girls.

In addition, study data also showed that Zamzee had a positive effect on key biological factors associated with diseases linked to sedentary behavior. Over six months, participants who used Zamzee showed reduced gains in LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, which is a risk factor for heart disease. Participants who consistently used Zamzee also showed improved blood sugar control (HbA1c), a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

Lance Henderson Zamzee Tackles Childhood Obesity: Interview with CEO Lance Henderson

Medgadget had the opportunity to interview Lance Henderson, the CEO of Zamzee, about their product, its advantages and disadvantages, and where he sees it going.

Shiv Gaglani, Medgadget: Where did the idea for Zamzee come from?

Lance Henderson, CEO of Zamzee: Zamzee was born at HopeLab, a nonprofit dedicated to using technology to improve the health and life of young people with chronic illnesses. Given the enourmous problems caused by sedentary behavior in America, HopeLab decided that the best way to effect the biggest change on this crisis was by making Zamzee a social enterprise.

Medgadget: How does the Zamzee work?

Henderson: Zamzee uses a tri-axis accelerometer to track activity, and a website that make exercise fun. For more about the research that designed Zamzee, you can read this blog post.

Medgadget: What are the advantages of using Zamzee as opposed to another pedometer? Are there disadvantages?

Henderson: Zamzee uses an accelerometer technology, which tracks the intensity of your activity, not just the number of steps you take (which is what a pedometer records). Integral to using Zamzee is also the online experience – which was designed to get kids excited about physical activity and to make being active fun. The website is an integral component to the Zamzee experience, and it uniquely incorporates gamification to make exercise fun in a way more stereotypical pedometers or activity monitors do not. For example, on the Zamzee website kids can take challenges and earn prizes – this is very different from, say, counting calories or working towards a weight loss goal. It is more fun. Of course, the disadvantage here is that if counting calories is your primary interest, Zamzee is not the solution for you as we do not track or quantify that information.

Medgadget: What trends in medical technology most excite you? What do you see as the future of Zamzee?

Henderson: The development of ubiquitous and lower cost mobile technologies, like Zamzee and smartphones, are changing the way that healthcare and consumers interact. It enables us to deliver on our goal to “lead with fun and health will follow.” Since Zamzee’s goal is to reverse the epidemic of sedentary behavior among kids in the U.S., taking advantage of mobile technologies as they develop will certainly be key to our future.

This author was also sent a review copy of the Zamzee, and was impressed at how light, inexpensive ($29.95), inconspicuous (that is, unless you add a skin to it for personalization), and easy it is to use. Any kid who regularly uses his or her computer will be able to use the Zamzee, though the key question is which kids will be most likely to use it. Given that at this stage activity monitors for adults seem to primarily be used by people who were already fit to begin with, we hope that Zamzee pulls in all types of children and facilitates a large scale behavior shift away from sedentary lifestyles. For more information about the Zamzee and how it works, check out the video below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRKv48FZQ0Q&feature=player_embedded

Source : http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/9/prweb9932554.htm

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Medasys Gains FDA Approval for Implantable Programmable Intrathecal Morphine Pump

Medasys Gains FDA Approval for Implantable Programmable Intrathecal Morphine Pump

Medasys Gains FDA Approval for Implantable Programmable Intrathecal Morphine Pump

MOUNT OLIVE, N.J., Feb. 13, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Medasys Inc., a medical device company focused on providing implantable drug delivery solutions, announced today that it has received PMA approval from the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Prometra® programmable implantable drug pump. Prometra will be the first non-peristaltic programmable implantable pump that has received FDA approval for delivery of INFUMORPH (preservative-free morphine sulfate sterile solution). INFUMORPH is indicated for intraspinal administration for the management of pain.

In addition to meeting all of the PMA safety and effectiveness requirements, a clinical trial demonstrated 97% clinical accuracy in the delivery of the physician-programmed dose, the highest labeled accuracy available for this type of pump.

“We are pleased to be able to utilize our engineering expertise and intellectual property to advance intrathecal therapy in the U.S.,” Steve Adler, President and CEO of Medasys commented. “Prometra represents the first significant evolution in pump technology available in the US in over 15 years.”

Advances in the Prometra pump design are intended to maximize device longevity and dose delivery accuracy. By reducing the number of moving parts and eliminating complex gears and rotors, pump dependability and reliability should be greatly improved. The Prometra also makes use of a patented valve gated precision dosing system to achieve extremely high accuracy, minimizing dose variations due to temperature, pressure, flow rate, or reservoir fill levels. It is expected that the combination of these factors will contribute to improved pain management.

It is estimated that 116 million people in the U.S. suffer with chronic pain. Continuous intrathecal delivery of INFUMORPH using a microinfusion device (e.g., implantable drug delivery pump) is a therapeutic option used for the management of chronic pain. Chronic pain can be debilitating, disabling, and negatively impact quality of life. The Prometra offers patients and physicians a new highly accurate option for drug delivery.

About Medasys

Medasys’ strategic goal is to become the leading implantable drug delivery company in the world. Founded in 2005, Medasys received approval to conduct its first clinical trial in 2007 on the Prometra programmable implantable pump. Medasys received approval by the FDA to market the Prometra in 2012. Medasys has been granted multiple patents, and is focused on working closely with physicians to rapidly improve the capabilities of implantable drug delivery and management systems.

For more information see the Medasys web site at: http://www.MedasysPumps.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements. The Company wishes to caution the reader of this press release that actual results may differ from those discussed in the forward-looking statements and may be adversely affected by, among other things, reimbursement policies, commercialization of new technologies, intellectual property, and other factors.

Medasys has received FDA pre-market approval for its Prometra programmable implantable drug pump. The Prometra is a non-peristaltic programmable implantable pump that delivers INFUMORPH (preservative-free morphine sulfate sterile solution) intrathecally for the management of pain.

The Prometra makes use of a valve gated precision dosing system to achieve high accuracy, minimizing dose variations due to temperature, pressure, flow rate, or reservoir fill levels. It has a minimal amount of moving parts and no complex gears and rotors.

The pump is implanted near the spine and has a microcatheter that runs to the intrathecal area of the lower spine. The intrathecal delivery makes it possible to use very low doses compared to other routes of administration, thus minimizing the risk of side-effects and lowering the amount of medication needed in the reservoir. The reservoir can be refilled percutaneously with a syringe and a needle.

Source : http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/medasys-inc-announces-fda-approval-for-implantable-programmable-drug-pump-139208249.html

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Pre-Cut Bone Wedges for Foot Surgery Now Available From Integra

Pre-Cut Bone Wedges for Foot Surgery Now Available From Integra

Pre-Cut Bone Wedges for Foot Surgery Now Available From Integra

Integra LifeSciences Announces Launch of the Integra(R) Allograft Wedge System for Extremity Reconstruction

PLAINSBORO, N.J., Feb. 8, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Integra LifeSciences Holdings Corporation (Nasdaq:IART) announced today the introduction of Integra® Allograft Wedge System, which consists of simple pre-cut allograft wedges for both Evans and Cotton osteotomies and a dedicated instrumentation set that is designed to provide a method of assessing osteotomy space to aid in the selection of the appropriate Integra® Allograft Wedge implant.

Osteotomies are procedures in which surgeons realign or remove a segment of bone located near a damaged joint to help correct deformities, typically in the foot. Integra® Allograft Wedge is designed to provide bone grafting material for osteotomy corrections. The Integra® Allograft Wedge is processed from human cancellous bone, sterilized through the BioCleanse® Tissue Sterilization Process and terminally sterilized using a validated method to achieve a Sterility Assurance Level (SAL) of 10-6. The wedge provides a natural scaffold for bone growth, as well as biologic stability and structural support for deformity corrections. It also eliminates significant harvest site morbidity that may result from autograft removal. Integra will feature the implant at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting, February 7-11, 2012 in San Francisco, California.

“Integra® Allograft Wedge System offers four sizes (6, 8, 10 and 12mm), which gives surgeons a significant addition to their treatment options and helps limit uncertainty by accommodating a patient’s unique surgical needs,” said Bill Weber, Vice President and General Manager, Integra Extremity Reconstruction.

The Integra® Allograft Wedge System is distributed through Integra’s Extremity Reconstruction sales organization, which focuses on lower extremity fixation, upper extremity fixation, tendon protection, peripheral nerve repair/protection and wound repair.

Integra LifeSciences, a world leader in medical devices, is dedicated to limiting uncertainty for surgeons, so they can concentrate on providing the best patient care. Integra offers innovative solutions in orthopedics, neurosurgery, spine, reconstructive and general surgery. For more information, please visit www.integralife.com.

This news release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements concerning the products and services provided by Integra. Such forward looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from predicted or expected results. Among other things, the willingness of surgical professionals to use Integra products may affect the prospects for their use in surgical procedures. In addition, the economic, competitive, governmental, technological and other factors, identified under the heading “Risk Factors” included in Item IA of Integra’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010 and information contained in subsequent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission could affect actual results.

Integra LifeSciences recently announced the launch of the Integra Allograft Wedge System, their pre-cut allograft wedges for Evans and Cotton osteotomies. Osteotomies are procedures in which bone is cut and then re-aligned, often with new bone placed as a wedge to secure the new position. The Cotton osteotomy involves the medial cuneiform and is used to correct rotational deformities of the forefoot. The Evans osteotomy, on the other hand, is a lengthening procedure for the calcaneus (heel bone) used most commonly for treating flatfeet. Both osteotomies involve placing a wedge of bone that is often harvested from the patient (autograft). While autograft provides superior structural and healing qualities to donated bone (allograft), harvesting it can cause significant pain and lengthen patient recovery.

Integra’s new Allograft Wedge System has pre-cut wedges in four sizes: 6, 8, 10 and 12mm. This theoretically should allow for more efficient procedures by bypassing some of the measuring and shaping of the graft material that needs to take place.

More from the press release:

Integra LifeSciences Holdings Corporation (Nasdaq:IART) announced today the introduction of Integra(R) Allograft Wedge System, which consists of simple pre-cut allograft wedges for both Evans and Cotton osteotomies and a dedicated instrumentation set that is designed to provide a method of assessing osteotomy space to aid in the selection of the appropriate Integra(R) Allograft Wedge implant.

The Integra(R) Allograft Wedge is processed from human cancellous bone, sterilized through the BioCleanse(R) Tissue Sterilization Process and terminally sterilized using a validated method to achieve a Sterility Assurance Level (SAL) of 10-6. The wedge provides a natural scaffold for bone growth, as well as biologic stability and structural support for deformity corrections. It also eliminates significant harvest site morbidity that may result from autograft removal. Integra will feature the implant at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting, February 7-11, 2012 in San Francisco, California.

“Integra(R) Allograft Wedge System offers four sizes (6, 8, 10 and 12mm), which gives surgeons a significant addition to their treatment options and helps limit uncertainty by accommodating a patient’s unique surgical needs,” said Bill Weber, Vice President and General Manager, Integra Extremity Reconstruction.

Source : http://investor.integralife.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=647134&keepThis=true&TB_iframe=true&height=550&width=790

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Smith & Nephew’s POLARCUP Hip System

Smith & Nephew’s POLARCUP Hip System

Smith & Nephew’s POLARCUP Hip System

Smith & Nephew (NYSE:SNN;LSE:SN), the global medical technology business, is introducing the clinically proven POLARCUP? Dual Mobility Hip System to orthopaedic surgeons in the US at this year’s American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) annual meeting in San Francisco. The system is specifically designed to address the challenges of treating patients – in both primary and revision cases – who are susceptible to dislocation and need enhanced stability.

Backed by 10 years of clinical history in Europe and other markets outside the US, the POLARCUP System allows surgeons to implant a smaller, constrained femoral component within a larger, anatomically sized polyethylene head, thus providing greater stability by increasing range of motion and jump distance. “This stability philosophy is widely used in the European market where surgeons have extensive experience with dual mobility in elderly and less active patients,” says John Soto, Senior Vice President for Smith & Nephew’s Global Hip Franchise.

The POLARCUP System is a complement to the company’s clinically proven BIRMINGHAM™ Hip Resurfacing System, which provides stability and durability for the young active patient.

To learn more about the POLARCUP System, please stop by the Smith & Nephew booth (#4947) at this year’s AAOS meeting.

About Smith & Nephew

Smith & Nephew is a global medical technology business dedicated to helping improve people’s lives. With leadership positions in Orthopaedic Reconstruction, Advanced Wound Management, Sports Medicine, Trauma and Clinical Therapies, Smith & Nephew has almost 11,000 employees and a presence in more than 90 countries. Annual sales in 2011 were nearly $4.3 billion. Smith & Nephew is a member of the FTSE100 (LSE: SN, NYSE: SNN).

Forward Looking Statements

This press release contains certain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. In particular, statements regarding planned growth in our business and in our operating margins discussed under “Outlook” are forward-looking statements as are discussions of our product pipeline. These statements, as well as the phrases “aim”, “plan”, “intend”, “anticipate”, “well-placed”, “believe”, “estimate”, “expect”, “target”, “consider” and similar expressions, are generally intended to identify forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other important factors (including, but not limited to, the outcome of litigation and regulatory approvals) that could cause the actual results, performance or achievements of Smith & Nephew, or industry results, to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Please refer to the documents that Smith & Nephew has filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission under the U.S. Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, including Smith & Nephew’s most recent annual report on Form 20F, for a discussion of certain of these factors.

All forward-looking statements in this press release are based on information available to Smith & Nephew as of the date hereof. All written or oral forward-looking statements attributable to Smith & Nephew or any person acting on behalf of Smith & Nephew are expressly qualified in their entirety by the foregoing. Smith & Nephew does not undertake any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statement contained herein to reflect any change in Smith & Nephew’s expectation with regard thereto or any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statement is based.

POLARCUP – Dual Mobility

Prof. Bousquet and the Medical School of Saint Etienne in France offered an answer to dislocation by creating the DUAL MOBILITY CONCEPT in 1976: an insert locked on a femoral ball head and moving freely in a thin metallic shell. This Dual Mobility principle consists in combining the advantagesof low friction with those of a big ball head.

This concept offers an extremely low dislocation rate, both for primary hip replacement and revision situations such as repetitive dislocations.

Features

Low rate of dislocation

The diameter of the joint becomes the insert’s diameter.

A superior-posterior 6º skirt under equatorial rim guarantees additional stability.

The self-centering insert decreases the impingement with the femoral neck.

The free insert more easily compensates slight deviation of the recommended cuppositioning.

Low wear rate

The optimised cup design prevents impingement with soft tissues and the femoral neck.

Extended range of motion compared to standard cup systems

The high head/neck ratio significantly increases the ROM.

Smith & Nephew is bringing its POLARCUP Dual Mobility Hip System to the US. SN POLARCUP Smith & Nephews POLARCUP Hip System Finally Comes to U.S.

It’s been implanted in Europe and other places outside the U.S. for over a decade, and the company says that the implant can deliver lower wear and dislocation rates when compared to competing devices.

The system is specifically designed to address the challenges of treating patients – in both primary and revision cases – who are susceptible to dislocation and need enhanced stability. Backed by 10 years of clinical history in Europe and other markets outside the US, the POLARCUP System allows surgeons to implant a smaller, constrained femoral component within a larger, anatomically sized polyethylene head, thus providing greater stability by increasing range of motion and jump distance.

Source : http://global.smith-nephew.com/master/40746.htm

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FDA Clears Two STD Tests for the Roche cobas 4800 Diagnostics System

FDA Clears Two STD Tests for the Roche cobas 4800 Diagnostics System

FDA Clears Two STD Tests for the Roche cobas 4800 Diagnostics System

Best combination of technologies available:

cobas x 480 Instrument

Fully automated sample preparation from primary vials

Ready-to-use, load-and-go reagents

No thawing or mixing required

Less than 20-minute set-up for full run of 94 samples

cobas z 480 Analyzer

Real-time PCR with digital data capture provides accurate qualitative results with no gray zone

Eliminates the need for equivocal sample retesting

Advanced results algorithm eliminates the need for manual curve analysis

Features and Benefits

Easy-to-learn and easy-to-use software

Intuitive user interface

Requires only a few hours training at all levels of laboratory personnel

Seamlessly integrates both system components

Streamlines workflow

Fully automated sample preparation

High quality nucleic acid extraction technology

Robust engineering reduces maintenance and downtime

Bi-directional connectivity with an LIS for automated results reporting reduces labor and potential for error

Promotes lab efficiency

Processes up to 384 samples a day

Efficient for labs with lower throughput requirements

Load primary collection tubes and liquid cytology vials directly on the system

Minimal input volumes allow multiple tests from the same patient specimen

New cobas CT/NG test expands cobas 4800 system menu beyond clinically proven HPV test to further enhance laboratory efficiency, automation capabilities

Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has provided 510(k) clearance to the cobas® CT/NG Test for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) infections in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients from male urine and self-collected vaginal swabs. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based multiplex dual probe assay, the test for chlamydia and gonorrhea offers excellent sensitivity and high specificity and runs on the automated cobas 4800 System, complementing the cobas HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Test that received FDA approval in April.

“This new test will give labs in the U.S. an efficient solution for offering clinicians chlamydia and gonorrhea screening using the preferred specimen types,” said Paul Brown, head of Roche Molecular Diagnostics. “Since it received CE mark in 2009, the test has been very well received by labs outside the U.S. and we are pleased to be able to offer it to the U.S. market.”

Male urine and self-collected vaginal swabs are the preferred specimen types for CT and NG testing, according to the summary report from the U.S. Association of Public Health Laboratories and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.1 The use of these specimen types is considered a progressive option for CT/NG screening, as they show high sensitivity yet are less invasive and less painful to collect than urethral or endocervical samples and thus may help promote screening compliance. The registrational trial for the cobas CT/NG test also confirmed that self-collected vaginal specimens and male urine specimens provide increased sensitivity and specificity when compared with alternative specimen types across patient populations with both low and high disease prevalence.

“This test will contribute to lowering the burden of disease by providing accurate results from easy to obtain samples – self collected vaginal swabs from women and first catch urine from males. Allowing patients to be active participants in maintaining their health will encourage screening and facilitate clinic flow,”said Dr. Barbara Van der Pol, assistant professor of epidemiology at the Indiana University School of Public Health.

The introduction of the new test expands the menu for the cobas 4800 System and enables laboratories to combine the cobas CT/NG Test and the cobas HPV Test onto a single platform. In addition to the current assays that focus on women’s health, Roche is developing tests for the cobas 4800 System menu in the areas of microbiology and oncology.

About the cobas 4800 System and the cobas HPV Test

The cobas 4800 System is designed to deliver new standards in laboratory testing efficiency and medically relevant diagnostic information. The system offers true walk-away automation and can run up to 282 tests in less than 12 hours, providing rapid analysis of screening tests to meet the needs of the majority of clinical labs.

The cobas HPV Test is the only clinically validated, FDA-approved and CE-marked assay that simultaneously provides pooled results on high-risk genotypes and individual results on the highest-risk genotypes, HPV 16 and HPV 18. Knowing a woman’s status with high-risk HPV genotypes is important as it can provide predictive information about her risk for cervical pre-cancer or cancer.2

About Roche

Headquartered in Basel, Switzerland, Roche is a leader in research-focused healthcare with combined strengths in pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. Roche is the world’s largest biotech company with truly differentiated medicines in oncology, virology, inflammation, metabolism and CNS. Roche is also the world leader in in vitro diagnostics, tissue-based cancer diagnostics and a pioneer in diabetes management. Roche’s personalized healthcare strategy aims at providing medicines and diagnostic tools that enable tangible improvements in the health, quality of life and survival of patients. In 2010, Roche had over 80’000 employees worldwide and invested over 9 billion Swiss francs in R&D. The Group posted sales of 47.5 billion Swiss francs. Genentech, United States, is a wholly owned member of the Roche Group. Roche has a majority stake in Chugai Pharmaceutical, Japan. For more information: www.roche.com.

Roche Molecular Diagnostics received FDA clearance for two new tests on its cobas 4800 PCR detection system. roche cobas z 480 FDA Clears Two STD Tests for the Roche cobas 4800 Diagnostics SystemThe cobas 4800 is a fully automated sample preparation device, which amplifies and detects DNA targets using real-time PCR. The device can run up to 94 tests in 4 hours, enabling rapid analysis of several STD screening tests. 5 different optical channels make it possible to detect multiple targets from one reaction tube. All reagents are easy to load and no thawing or mixing is required. An advanced results algorithm eliminates the need for extra manual curve analysis on the digitally captured data.

The two newly approved tests are used to detect chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) infections in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients from male urine and self-collected vaginal swabs. The test runs in a multiplex dual probe assay, which means the two targets can be detected in only one sample.

A Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) test already received FDA clearance for the cobas 4800 in April of last year. This test simultaneously provides pooled results on high-risk genotypes like HPV 16 and HPV 18. This makes it possible for laboratories to combine the CT/NG Test and HPV Test onto a single platform.

According to the press release, the registrational trial for the cobas CT/NG test confirmed that self-collected vaginal specimens and male urine specimens provide increased sensitivity and specificity when compared with alternative specimen. The self collection of specimen may help promote the screening compliance for sexually transmitted infections.

Barbara Van der Pol, assistant professor of epidemiology at the Indiana University School of Public Health was cited in the press release:

This test will contribute to lowering the burden of disease by providing accurate results from easy to obtain samples – self collected vaginal swabs from women and first catch urine from males. Allowing patients to be active participants in maintaining their health will encourage screening and facilitate clinic flow.

Source : http://molecular.roche.com/News/LocalNews/Pages/RochereceivesFDAclearancefortesttoscreenanddiagnosechlamydiaandgonorrheainfectioninsymptomaticandasymptomaticpatients.aspx

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Surgical Robotics Pioneer Discusses Holomers and Plasma Medicine at FutureMed

Surgical Robotics Pioneer Discusses Holomers and Plasma Medicine at FutureMed

Surgical Robotics Pioneer Discusses Holomers and Plasma Medicine at FutureMed

FutureMed is an intimate program with one-on-one interaction with many of the 50+ World Class Faculty. Space is limited and FutureMed 2011 and 2012 sold out. The next FutureMed dates are still to be announced.

At FutureMed, Richard Satava, MD gave an impressive presentation that touched on everything from breakthroughs in surgical robotics to plasma medicine. He is a professor of surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center, but he also helped pioneer the surgical robotic system that eventually became Intuitive Surgical’s da Vinci.

Early in his talk, Dr. Satava stressed the need for a new scientific methodology. While the scientific method has served us well and will do so going forward, it has limitations. In the future, we should expand our reliance on simulation technology, which “takes our current information technologies out of the present and brings them into the future.” Simulation technology, once it is able to mimic human biological processes, would disrupt the clinical trial process. “Right now, it costs $200 million dollars and 20 years to go through a complete, randomized clinical study.” But in the future, clinical trials won’t be based on “blood and guts,” they’ll be based on bits and bytes. And they will be much more accurate and faster to carry out.

And, we should look more carefully at outliers generated from scientific research, he said. “That may be the key to the next revolution.”

futuremed logo1 Surgical Robotics Pioneer Discusses Holomers and Plasma Medicine at FutureMedA Virtual Person

Dr. Satava stressed the need for information-based representations of patients in medicine. “We need to have a new kind of electronic medical record,” he said. A medical record should include a personal body scan with data embedded into it. As an example of this, he pointed to the holomer: (HOLO-graphic M-edical E-lectronic R-epresentation) developed by DARPA. In particular, patients should have such a scan done when they are well. That way, when they are ill or have an injury, a new scan can be done and compared against the previous data. When a person is ill or injured, it is the change in status that is the important factor.

scan image Surgical Robotics Pioneer Discusses Holomers and Plasma Medicine at FutureMed

When this technology is mature, it could allow someone to virtually test a drug or medical device before actual use. This simulation technology could be made accurate by marrying it with genomics, physiological, and other related data.

The government has already considered this technology “from a different direction” in its virtual autopsy research. The military can use information gleaned from such virtual autopsies to change its tactics on the battlefield. It could, for instance, use this data to develop more-effective armor in its vehicles.

autopsy scan Surgical Robotics Pioneer Discusses Holomers and Plasma Medicine at FutureMed

The Power of Robotics

As surgical robotic technology evolves, it will become an increasingly important point of integration for healthcare delivery. The technology, which Dr. Satava explained is better characterized as an “information system” than a robot, will help save time, increase efficiency, and collect important data. At present, 95% of the potential of the da Vinci robot is squandered. All of the data that it is generating when a surgeon moves his hand or looks at an image is thrown away, he says. “That should be shared over the healthcare enterprise.”

In addition, robots could be used in the OR to replace scrub nurses, who pass surgical tools to surgeons. Nurses have more important things to do, like interacting with patients, Dr. Satava explained.

Plasma Medicine

Dr. Satava noted that one of the fundamental changes about the information age is it represents a move away from physical objects to information and energy. “Energy is going to be a very important part of the future of medicine,” he reasoned. This form of medicine will be able to harness the power of plasma (as in an energy cloud) with handheld instruments at room temperature. In the plasma cloud are charged particles that can work directly on individual cells and at the molecular level. The budding field gives physicians the power to turn on and turn off specific molecules to, for instance, influence coagulation times and wound healing. It also can be used to kill biological agents. “At this moment in time, there is no known biological agent that is resistant to plasma exposure for 30 seconds,” he said. He surmised that plasma medicine represents one of the “most exciting new areas in addition to genomics” in modern medicine.

Source : http://futuremed2020.com/

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Biological Computer Performs Decryption of Images

Biological Computer Performs Decryption of Images

Biological Computer Performs Decryption of Images

Series of Five Studies Highlights Potential of Technology to Boost Patient Care, Research

LA JOLLA, CA – February 3, 2012 – Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Health, and collaborating cancer physicians have successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of an advanced blood test for detecting and analyzing circulating tumor cells (CTCs)—breakaway cells from patients’ solid tumors—from cancer patients. The findings, reported in five new papers, show that the highly sensitive blood analysis provides information that may soon be comparable to that from some types of surgical biopsies.

“It’s a next-generation technology,” said Scripps Research Associate Professor Peter Kuhn, PhD, senior investigator of the new studies and primary inventor of the high-definition blood test. “It significantly boosts our ability to monitor, predict, and understand cancer progression, including metastasis, which is the major cause of death for cancer patients.”

The studies were published February 3, 2012, in the journal Physical Biology.

The new test, called HD-CTC, labels cells in a patient’s blood sample in a way that distinguishes possible CTCs from ordinary red and white blood cells. It then uses a digital microscope and an image-processing algorithm to isolate the suspect cells with sizes and shapes (“morphologies”) unlike those of healthy cells. Just as in a surgical biopsy, a pathologist can examine the images of the suspected CTCs to eliminate false positives and note their morphologies.

Kuhn emphasizes that this basic setup can be easily modified with different cell-labeling and image-processing techniques.

Five New Studies, Five Steps Forward

To test the new technology, members of the Kuhn lab at Scripps Research teamed up with pathologists and oncologists at Scripps Health in La Jolla, California; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego; the Billings Clinic in Billings, Montana; the Division of Medical Oncology at the University of California, San Francisco; the Center for Applied Molecular Medicine at the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles; and the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

The five new studies that resulted from the collaboration not only demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the new test for a number of different cancer types, but also begin to explore the utility of the technology for diagnosing and monitoring patients and improving cancer research in the lab. While other tests for CTCs typically use “enrichment” steps in which suspected CTCs are concentrated—and these methods inadvertently exclude some types of CTCs—the new studies show HD-CTC works well as a no-cell-left-behind process and enables a more complete analysis.

Also striking is the quality of the images. “The high definition method gives a detailed portrait of these elusive cells that are caught in the act of spreading around the body,” said diagnostic pathologist Kelly Bethel, MD, of Scripps Health, Scripps Research, and UC San Diego School of Medicine, who is the senior clinical investigator on Kuhn’s team. “It’s unprecedented—we’ve never been able to see them routinely and in high definition like this before.”

In the first study, the research team examined 83 advanced cancer patients using HD-CTC to document the test’s sensitivity and accuracy for different cancer types. The scientists found that the test detected five or more CTCs per milliliter of blood in 80 percent of patients with metastatic prostate cancer, 70 percent of those with metastatic breast cancer, 50 percent of those with metastatic pancreatic cancer, and no healthy subjects. The current gold-standard CTC test, known as CellSearch, was notably less sensitive in detecting tumor cells in these samples.

Most patients whose CTC counts surpassed the detection threshold also showed small aggregates of CTCs, which cancer biologists term “microtumor emboli.” These are widely suspected to be incipient metastatic tumors, as well as triggers for the blood clots that often kill advanced cancer patients. In the second study, the scientists showed that HD-CTC could detect these aggregates in 43 percent of 71 patients with advanced prostate, lung, pancreas, and breast cancers, and in none of a group of 15 healthy subjects. “This tells us that HD-CTC could be helpful in studying the origins of cancer metastases and related blood clots, and for predicting them, too,” Kuhn said.

In the third study, the team used HD-CTC to compare circulating tumor cells from prostate cancer patients with cells from prostate cancer cell lines that researchers often use as convenient models for prostate cancer biology in the lab. The team found significant differences between the two classes of cells, in their cell morphology and in the way they were labeled by HD-CTC’s fluorescent tags. “This underscores the need for studying cancer cells from patients, not just model cancer cells that in some ways may be utterly different from the real thing,” Kuhn said.

In the fourth study, the researchers performed HD-CTC tests on 28 patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer over periods of up to a year. The team was able to detect CTCs in 68 percent of samples, and found that the numbers of detected CTCs tended to go up as other measures showed cancer progression.

In the fifth and final paper of the series, the team used HD-CTC in 78 patients who had just been diagnosed with various stages of non-small-cell lung cancer. “We demonstrated that we could sensitively detect CTCs even in patients with early-stage cancer,” Kuhn said.

This result points to the possibility of using the HD-CTC blood test not only to evaluate already-diagnosed cancer, but also to help detect cancer in people who are unaware they have it. “If HD-CTC works on the day after cancer diagnosis, as we’ve shown, then one can easily imagine that it would work the day before diagnosis, too,” Kuhn said.

Kuhn and his colleagues now intend to study the use of HD-CTC as a potential screening test and to develop it further for use in clinical monitoring and cancer research. Kuhn has founded a San Diego-based biotechnology company, Epic Sciences, Inc., to develop HD-CTC commercially for companion diagnostic products in personalized cancer care.

Dena Marrinucci, PhD, of Scripps Research was first author of the study, “Fluid biopsy in patients with metastatic prostate, pancreatic and breast cancer”; Edward H. Cho, PhD, of Scripps Research was first author of “Characterization of circulating tumor cell aggregates identified in patients with epithelial tumors”; Daniel C. Lazar of Scripps Research was first author of “Cytometric comparisons between circulating tumor cells from prostate cancer patients and the prostate-tumor-derived LNCaP cell Line”; Jorge Nieva, MD, of Scripps Research was first author of “High-definition imaging of circulating tumor cells and associated cellular events in non-small cell lung cancer patients: a longitudinal analysis; and Marco Wendel, PhD, of Scripps Research and Lyudmila Bazhenova, MD, of UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center were first authors of “Fluid biopsy for circulating tumor cell identification in patients with early and late stage non-small cell lung cancer; a glimpse into lung cancer biology.”

Kuhn’s laboratory is supported by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the US National Institutes of Health as the NCI Scripps Physics Oncology Center, which was initially supported through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. For more information see http://4db.us and http://physics.cancer.gov.

About The Scripps Research Institute

The Scripps Research Institute is one of the world’s largest independent, not-for-profit organizations focusing on research in the biomedical sciences. Over the past decades, Scripps Research has developed a lengthy track record of major contributions to science and health, including laying the foundation for new treatments for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, hemophilia, and other diseases. The institute employs about 3,000 people on its campuses in La Jolla, CA, and Jupiter, FL, where its renowned scientists—including three Nobel laureates—work toward their next discoveries. The institute’s graduate program, which awards Ph.D. degrees in biology and chemistry, ranks among the top ten of its kind in the nation. For more information, see www.scripps.edu.

This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0523928 and the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute (RBNI). We also thank the Israel-US Binational Science Foundation and the Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology. S.S. thanks the Irwin and Joan Jacobs Foundation, the Fine Foundation, the RBNI, and the Ministry of Science and Technology for graduate school fellowships. E.K. is incumbent of the Benno Gitter & Ilana Ben-Ami Chair of Biotechnology, Technion. We thank Dr. Miriam Kott-Gutkowski, Head of the MicroArray Service Laboratory in the Core Reasearch Facility at the Faculty of Medicine—Ein Karem, Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Cracking the encryption: Parallel computing with molecular finite-state automata and fluorescently labeled DNA molecules has been used to decipher two different images encrypted onto a single DNA chip (see picture). The images were deciphered by a mixture of input molecules that were processed by biomolecular automata, a strategy that potentially offers a huge

Source : http://www.scripps.edu/news/press/2012/20120202kuhn.html

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