Steven Palter Helps Bring Web Tech to Peer-Reviewed Articles

Steven Palter Helps Bring Web Tech to Peer-Reviewed Articles

Authors: Luiz Caravalho, Rebecca Flyckt, Pedro Escobar, Tommaso Falcone

Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio

Capsule: Knowledge of abdominal wall anatomy can facilitate surgical access for a single site or single port laparoscopy

Objective: Single Port Laparoscopic (SPL) surgery has reduced the number of sites required to perform laparoscopic surgery.1-3 However, the incision at the umbilicus is larger than conventional laparoscopic surgery. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the abdominal wall anatomy necessary to perform a single port laparoscopic procedure. Design: Video presentation of clinical article. The video uses animation and surgical cases to demonstrate the relevant abdominal wall anatomy to establish surgical access for a single site or single port laparoscopy.

Results: This video demonstrates the regional anatomy pertinent to the anterior abdominal wall specifically of the umbilicus. The umbilicus is a focal point of fusion of the anterior abdominal wall muscles that allows entry into the peritoneal cavity. For this procedure there are 2 incisions possible, a small midline intra-umbilical one and am omega incision. The video demonstrates each technique. Introduction of a port into this single incision is demonstrated with 2 different trocar systems. These trocar systems show how the limitations of using a single site may be reduced.

Conclusion: The abdominal wall anatomy is unique at the umbilicus and allows optimal placement of a single trocar to allow laparoscopic surgery.

References

Escobar PF. Fader AN. Paraiso MF. Kaouk JH. Falcone T. Robotic-assisted laparoendoscopic single-site surgery in gynecology: initial report and technique. Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology. 2009:589-91.

Escobar PF. Bedaiwy MA. Fader AN. Falcone T. Laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery in patients with benign adnexal disease. Fertility & Sterility. 2010; 93:e7-10.

Escobar PF, Kebria M, Falcone T. Evaluation of a novel single-port robotic platform in the cadaver model for the performance of various procedures in gynecologic oncology. Gynecol Oncol. 2011 120:380-38

Conclusion: The abdominal wall anatomy is unique at the umbilicus and allows optimal placement of a single trocar to allow laparoscopic surgery.

Washington DC (June 19, 2012) – Fertility and Sterility, the flagship journal of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and its publisher Elsevier, announce the first-ever publication of a new multimedia article format that integrates video and traditional print research.

Online video and traditional print were previously two separate and unrelated worlds in scientific research. The new mechanism allows videos to be cited the same way as a written article in a traditional print medical journal and seamlessly unifies online multimedia content and print journals. Researchers can watch footage of innovations and techniques and learn previously inaccessible information in new non-written formats while still being able to find this information through traditional medical print sources.

“For the last 200 years, medical publishing remained unchanged. Our solution accommodates non-print work through fully integrated multimedia, opens up a whole new form of learning, and allows readers to become part of an ongoing interactive discussion,” says Dr. Steven Palter, the Video and New Media Editor of Fertility and Sterility. Dr. Palter, who developed the concept and spearheaded the project, says “With this effort, we have bridged the gap separating the digital and traditional medical literature. This integration will lead to exciting new directions in research.”

The new media initiative is unique in several ways. It allows an article to exist simultaneously online and in the traditional medical journal and it enables videos to be citable publications for all traditional journals. Fertility and Sterility embeds an open access link in the article that appears both in PubMed and the Journal’s electronic tables of contents, and also in the print journal. QR codes associated with each article seamlessly bring readers from print journal to online video. Authors can create review articles, experimental techniques, anatomic overviews, case reports, and more. Videos, which are peer reviewed as part of the mainstream submission process are served open source through Google’s YouTube.

Craig Niederberger MD, Co-Editor-in-Chief of Fertility and Sterility said, “We are committed to using modern communication methods, from online video to social media to enhance Fertility and Sterility. Medical journals are about conveying new information and new discoveries to others in the field. We simply cannot rely on print alone to do that anymore.”

Antonio Pellicer, MD, Co- Editor-in-Chief of the journal, said, “Medicine has always been an international pursuit. Now with online distribution of multimedia articles the sharing of knowledge can occur even faster, indeed simultaneously around the globe, thus improving patient care more quickly and without regard to geography.”

The first article “Single port laparoscopy” is authored by L. Carvalho et al from the Cleveland Clinic, and appears in the May 2012 issue of Fertility and Sterility and shows a new surgical principle. The abstract both on-line and in the print publication leads to an online video showing the technique: http://fertstertforum.com/2012974caravalho. The article is currently indexed in PubMed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22542145.

The second article, “Chromosome transfer in mature oocytes,” is authored by M. Tachibana et al. From the Oregon National Primate Research Center and also appears in the May 2012 issue of Fertility and Sterility. The video which demonstrates the innovative laboratory technique is at http://fertstertforum.com/2012974tachibana. The article is currently indexed in PubMed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22542144.

With this innovation, ASRM and Elsevier have embraced the digital revolution that has rapidly transformed traditional publishing. Just as the Amazon Kindle brought epublishing to the masses, the new video article initiative of Fertility and Sterility bridges the gap between online multimedia and traditional medical research publishing.

The American Society for Reproductive Medicine, founded in 1944, is an organization of 8,000 physicians, researchers, nurses, technicians and other professionals dedicated to advancing knowledge and expertise in reproductive biology. Affiliated societies include the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, the Society for Male Reproduction and Urology, the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, the Society of Reproductive Surgeons, and the Society of Reproductive Biologists and Technologists.

Congratulations to our old friend Steven Palter, MD who’s been working with Elsevier and the American Society of Reproductive Medicine to birth a “video article format” with all the rigor of peer-reviewed publications, indexing through PubMed, but with the open commentary of the web and accessibility of YouTube.

From Dr. Palter’s blog, Doc in the Machine:

The project began with my frustration at seeing medical research shoehorned into an an antiquated print system that precluded any leverage of the power of modern digital research and communication.

Online video and traditional print were previously two separate and unrelated worlds in scientific research. I was astounded when i saw online journals that described how traditional print research couldn’t allow multimedia content. It was obvious that we needed to find a mechanism to radically change medical research from within the system rather than try to build something new and reject a system used by all of scientific research.

The new mechanism allows videos to be cited the same way as a written article in a traditional print medical journal and seamlessly unifies online multimedia content and print journals. Researchers can watch footage of innovations and techniques and learn previously inaccessible information in new non-written formats while still being able to find this information through traditional medical print sources.

Source : http://fertstertforum.com/2012974caravalho/

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