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Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Market Segment and Manufacturers analysis by Region, Type and Applications

Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Market Segment and Manufacturers analysis by Region, Type and Applications

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The Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Market research study report is a respected source of information which offers a telescopic view of the current market status. Various key factors are discussed in the report, which will help the buyer in studying the Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment market trends and opportunities. The Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment market is a highly diligent study on competitive landscape analysis, prime manufacturers, marketing strategies analysis, Market Effect Factor Analysis and Consumer Needs by major regions, types, applications in Global market considering the past, current and future state of the Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment industry. The report provides a thorough overview of the Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Market including definitions, classifications, applications and chain structure.

This Research study focus on these types: –

  • Desktop
  • Portable
  • Other

This Research study focus on these applications: –

  • Hospital
  • Clinic
  • Other

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This report studies Interferons in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with Production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering

  • Roche Holdings AG
  • Lifescan
  • Bayer AG
  • Abbott Laboratories
  • Johnson and Johnson
  • I-SENS
  • Omron
  • ARKRAY
  • Braun
  • 77 Elektronika
  • Nipro Dagnostics
  • AgaMatrix
  • ALL Medicus

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Several important areas are covered in this Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment market research report. Some key points among them: –

  1. What Overview Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Says? This Overview Includes Diligent Analysis of Scope, Types, Application, Sales by region, manufacturers, types and applications
  2. What Is Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Competition considering Manufacturers, Types and Application? Based on Thorough Research of Key Factors
  3. Who Are Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Global Key Manufacturers? Along with this survey you also get their Product Information (Type, Application and Specification)
  4. Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment’s Manufacturing Cost Analysis –This Analysis is done by considering these prime elements like Key RAW Materials, Price Trends, Market Concentration Rate of Raw Materials, Proportion of Raw Materials and Labour Cost in Manufacturing Cost Structure
  5. Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Industrial Chain Analysis
  6. Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Marketing strategies analysis by
  7. Market Positioning
  8. Pricing and Branding Strategy
  9. Client Targeting
  10. Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Effect Factor Analysis
  11. Technology Process/Risk Considering Substitute Threat and Technology Progress In Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Industry
  12. Consumer Needs or What Change Is Observed in Preference of Customer
  13. Political/Economical Change
  14. What is Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment forecast (2016-2021) Considering Sales, Revenue for Regions, Types and Applications?

Topics such as sales and sales revenue overview, production market share by product type, capacity and production overview, import, export, and consumption are covered under the development trend section of the Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment market report.

Lastly, the feasibility analysis of new project investment is done in the report, which consist of a detailed SWOT analysis of the Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment market. Both established and new players in the Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment industry can use this report for complete understanding of the market.

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Some of key Tables and Figures included in this research study: –

  1. Figure Picture of Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment
  2. Figure USA, Europe, China. Southeast Asia, India, Japan Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021)
  3. Table Production Base and Market Concentration Rate of Raw Material
  4. Figure Manufacturing Cost Structure of Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment
  5. Figure Manufacturing Process Analysis of Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment
  6. Figure Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Industrial Chain Analysis
  7. Figure Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Sales and Growth Rate Forecast (2016-2021)
  8. Figure Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Revenue and Growth Rate Forecast (2016-2021)
  9. Table Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Sales Forecast by Regions (2016-2021)
  10. Table Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Sales Forecast by Type (2016-2021)
  11. Table Global Blood Glucose Testing Equiment Sales Forecast by Application (2016-2021)

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Portable Antibiotic Resistance Detector Developed

Portable Antibiotic Resistance Detector Developed

antimicrobial-test

 

Researchers at University of California, Los Angeles developed a smartphone attachment capable of identifying whether a sample of a given bacteria is resistant to a particular antibiotic. The technology may have great potential for use in areas susceptible to the spread of infectious diseases when expensive laboratory equipment is not available.

There are 96 chambers within the device, each containing a bacterial sample mixed with a dose of an antibiotic and given time to react to the medicine. An array of LEDs illuminates the samples while the phone’s camera captures images of how light passes through the sample chambers using a special app. These images are then transferred to a remote computer server that analyzes them and sends the final results back to the app. Once the bacterial samples are placed into the device, the actual testing takes only a few minutes.

The researchers tested the device by trying 17 different antibiotics on the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacterium gathered from 78 different patient samples. They showed that their portable detector has an accuracy of 98.2%, high enough to be used in clinical practice.

“This mobile reader could eliminate the need for trained diagnosticians to perform antimicrobial susceptibility testing, reduce the cost barrier for routine testing, and assist in tracking of bacterial resistance globally,” said Omai Garner, UCLA assistant professor of pathology and laboratory medicine in Health Sciences who worked on the new device.

Open access study in journal Scientific ReportsHigh-throughput and automated diagnosis of antimicrobial resistance using a cost-effective cellphone-based micro-plate reader…

More from UCLA…

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Healthcare Startup Society Conference and Awards Ceremony in London

Healthcare Startup Society Conference and Awards Ceremony in London

healthcare-startup-society

 

Hosted by the UK-based Healthcare Startup Society, the conference and awards ceremony on December 17th brought together nearly 200 participants, including some big name medtech innovators and startups, along with tech experts, VCs, students, and “doctorpreneurs.” Attendees had traveled to the conference from as far as Silicon Valley, and while the December weather in London could never rival California, the fantastic venue in Kensington did boast resident flamingos!

Guest speakers covered an impressive array of medtech subjects throughout the day. The issue of funding, from both sides of the table, was examined with talks by the teams behind crowd source platformCrowdcube and surgical simulator company Touch Surgery.

The importance of a great team, and then how to go about building it, was emphasized by the co-founders of Doctify. Some of the challenges and rewards of innovation as a clinician within the healthcare sector were presented by Harry Thirkettle from the NHS Clinical Entrepreneur program. While the team behind smartphone-based digital otoscope, Cupris, explained what it takes to bring a device from an idea to the clinic.

Shafi Ahmed the "VR surgeon"

Shafi Ahmed the “VR surgeon”

Special guest Shafi Ahmed explained the motivation behind his recent performance of the world’s first VR live-streamed surgeryand the power of technology to help train thousands of surgeons worldwide at low cost and in increasingly remote areas.

The audience was challenged to think big by the Healthcare Startup Society’s founder,Alex Young, while the Linguisticator team took the idea of abstract learning and medical education to a whole new level with VR mind palaces. Bringing start-up wisdom from outside of the healthcare space, the co-founder of Propercorn spoke about ensuring that all you do is “done properly” and the importance of sharing your story with customers and users.

Morning networking session at the Healthcare Startup Society conference

Morning networking session at the Healthcare Startup Society conference

In spite of the perpetual London fog, the informal atmosphere sparked lively discussion and networking opportunities between attendees from different disciplines and continents. The conference culminated in the presentation of the Healthcare Startup Society award winners, including:

Device of the Year

SightPlus from Givevision – SightPlus is an innovative system that couples a smartphone with a VR-like headset and helps restore vision for those with sight problems. SightPlus allows users to adjust the focus, color, contrast, brightness, and magnification of the world around them—making reading, watching TV, or travelling independently possible, sometimes for the first time.

App of the Year

Echo – Echo offers a streamlined and sophisticated solution to allow patients to take control of their repeat prescriptions with their smartphone or smartwatch. A user’s medication list is stored in the app by scanning the barcodes or locating the drug in a database. And after giving the details of their NHS GP, the user’s prescription refills are automatically mailed to them when needed. The app also sends notifications reminding users when to take their medication, leaving them with one less thing to worry about.

Non-profit of the Year

Patient Innovation – Patient Innovation is based in Portugal but allows patients and caregivers around the world to connect. Users create and share solutions for health-related problems that they have developed independently or with collaborators. Founded in 2014, Patient Innovation boasts over 650 solutions from more than 40 countries, with solutions ranging from 3D-printed prosthetics to clothing and smartphones apps, all presented in step-by-step guides and how-to videos.

Entrepreneur of the Year

Stephanie Eltz and Suman Saha (Doctify) – Stephanie and Suman are the founding clinicians behind Doctify. Doctify is a user-focused database of UK private-practice health professionals that allows patients to search by specialism, location, and insurance coverage. The Doctify website then allows users to compare specialists after reading reviews from both verified patients and clinical colleagues, before booking a convenient appointment.

People’s Choice Award

Sensely – Focused on chronic conditions, Sensely offers an innovative avatar-based care solution in the form of a smartphone app and their virtual nurse, Molly (or Olivia in the UK version). Sensely allows a clinician to seamlessly monitor a patient’s personalized care plan after being discharged from hospital: a patient checks-in with their nurse avatar periodically, while the clinician monitors risk factors and adjusts clinical protocol accordingly. Clinicians are alerted if the patient does not obey the regimen and can coordinate a follow-up video-call or specialist appointment.

Start-up of the Year

Cera – Cera helps users coordinate in-home care for a variety of needs including elderly, palliative, respite, dementia, and post-discharge care. The Cera system connects users, by phone call or smartphone app, with qualified, vetted, and user-reviewed professional carers who set up a personalized care plan in as little as 24 hours, complete with 24/7 support.

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RFID Blood Monitoring Systems Industry 2019 Market Analysis Survey Research Growth and Forecast Report

RFID blood monitoring is a technology used for tracking and inventory management of blood and blood products in hospitals and blood banks. The RFID blood monitoring systems market has made a significant impact on global healthcare industry, prime reason being increased adoption of RFID tracking systems in reducing human efforts and errors in maintenance and control of healthcare inventory, documentation and patient management.

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High prevalence of blood disorders and growing need for therapeutic blood transfusion has increased the demand for blood and blood products globally. The simultaneous increase in the aging population demanding blood transfusion and consequent rise in need for inventory management of blood banks and hospital blood centers can be efficiently managed by using RFID blood tracking solutions. Proper installation and implementation of RFID blood tracking solutions also result in cost containment in the long run to medical institutions. RFID enabled smart refrigerators being one of the fastest growing segments in this market, has witnessed an upswing in the demand of such equipment in blood banks and in hospital blood centers. Though at budding stage, the demand for RFID blood refrigerators and freezers is expected to propel due to the increasing demand for blood products. The market for RFID blood refrigerators and freezers was worth USD 32.8 million in 2011 and is expected to undergo double digit growth in the upcoming years.

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Being one of the most regulated industries across the world, healthcare industry requires compliance criteria to be met at every stage of product management. RFID has the potential of improving patient safety and providing seamless healthcare service to the ever increasing patient pool through efficient inventory reduction and management, increased labor efficiency and overall operational automation. The market for application of RFID refrigerators and freezers in blood banks and hospital blood centers is still at a developing stage and further acceptance and growth of this market is expected in near future. The market players in the RFID blood refrigerators and freezers industry offer both retrofitting of conventional blood refrigerators as well as manufacture of new solutions.

Consultants, hospitals and other medical facilities hold a view that tracking systems of RFID are easy to use and the staff members of such facilities seem to largely benefit from the use of this technology. Real time savings is an added advantage of installation of RFID blood tracking systems. Lengthy lists of RFID solution providers showcase signs that hospitals are becoming increasingly interested in adopting these systems as well as an increase in facility-wide installation of RFID systems.

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Geographically, North America dominates the global RFID blood refrigerators and freezers market. Growing acceptance of RFID tracking technology by major industries and verified efficiency in hospitals through long-term use of RFID systems drives the market for RFID blood monitoring in North America. In addition, technology advancements, developing healthcare infrastructure, increased funding to healthcare organizations and need for efficient inventory management of blood products ensuring reduced blood transfusion errors with the use of RFID enabled refrigerators and cabinets in emerging economies are the major factors which drive the Asia-Pacific, Latin American and Middle Eastern market.

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US Navy to Trial Hemopure Stabilized Hemoglobin

US Navy to Trial Hemopure Stabilized Hemoglobin

US Navy to Trial Hemopure Stabilized Hemoglobin

OPK Biotech LLC develops, manufactures and markets oxygen therapeutics, a new class of pharmaceuticals that are administered intravenously to increase oxygen transport to the body’s tissues. Using our patented and proprietary technology, we have developed and manufacture two products: Hemopure® (HBOC-201) [hemoglobin glutamer - 250 (bovine)] for human use, and Oxyglobin® (HBOC-301) [hemoglobin glutamer - 200 (bovine)] for veterinary use.

The drug, a product of Biopure Corp, a Cambridge, Mass company, has been under development for many years now. At present, Hemopure® has been approved for marketing in South Africa, where it is “indicated for the treatment of adult surgical patients who are acutely anaemic. Hemopure is indicated for the purpose of eliminating, delaying, or reducing the need for allogenic red blood cells.” The company says Hemopure provides “an oxygen treatment bridge” in surgical patients by buying time for patients to build up their own reserves of red blood cells following surgery, hence eliminating the need for red blood cell transfusions in the immediate post operative period.

From the press release:

In June 2008, the NMRC submitted and subsequently withdrew an Op RESUS protocol for a Phase 2 clinical trial of Hemopure for resuscitation of operations casualties with severe traumatic hemorrhagic shock, when blood transfusion is not available. The proposed trial hypothesis is that for such casualties Hemopure will improve survival and other clinical parameters, and will be relatively safe and well tolerated, in comparison with “standard fluid.” If the trial is permitted to proceed, subjects will sign an informed consent prospectively. The revised Op RESUS protocol addresses some of the issues raised by the FDA on the initial filing.

Under a research agreement with Biopure, the NMRC assumed primary responsibility, subject to funding, for designing, seeking FDA acceptance of and directing a trial for Hemopure’s prehospital use in trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock. The NMRC has developed protocols for trials in civilian casualties in the United States and abroad (RESUS) as well as Op RESUS. To date, Congress has appropriated funds for the development of Hemopure for potential use in military and civilian trauma indications and to cover military administrative costs. This funding is being used for trial preparation and for preclinical studies of Hemopure in animal models, including those that mimic military trauma scenarios. RESUS remains on clinical hold, and the Company anticipates that NMRC will also submit an amended version of that protocol.

Biopure Corporation develops, manufactures and markets pharmaceuticals, called oxygen therapeutics that are intravenously administered to deliver oxygen to the body’s tissues. Hemopure(R) [hemoglobin glutamer - 250 (bovine)], or HBOC-201, is approved for sale in South Africa for the treatment of surgical patients who are acutely anemic. On November 21, 2008, the Company announced that it had terminated most of its work force for financial reasons. Using its limited resources, the Company is developing Hemopure for other indications and is supporting the U.S. Navy’s government-funded efforts to develop a potential out-of-hospital trauma indication. Biopure’s veterinary product Oxyglobin(R) [hemoglobin glutamer - 200 (bovine)], or HBOC-301, the only oxygen therapeutic approved for marketing by both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Commission, is indicated for the treatment of anemia in dogs. Biopure has sold approximately 200,000 units of Oxyglobin since its launch.

Context Hemoglobin-based blood substitutes (HBBSs) are infusible oxygen-carrying liquids that have long shelf lives, have no need for refrigeration or cross-matching, and are ideal for treating hemorrhagic shock in remote settings. Some trials of HBBSs during the last decade have reported increased risks without clinical benefit.

Objective To assess the safety of HBBSs in surgical, stroke, and trauma patients.

Data Sources PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library searches for articles using hemoglobin and blood substitutes from 1980 through March 25, 2008; reviews of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee meeting materials; and Internet searches for company press releases.

Study Selection Randomized controlled trials including patients aged 19 years and older receiving HBBSs therapeutically. The database searches yielded 70 trials of which 13 met these criteria; in addition, data from 2 other trials were reported in 2 press releases, and additional data were included in 1 relevant FDA review.

Data Extraction Data on death and myocardial infarction (MI) as outcome variables.

Results Sixteen trials involving 5 different products and 3711 patients in varied patient populations were identified. A test for heterogeneity of the results of these trials was not significant for either mortality or MI (for both, I2 = 0%, P ? .60), and data were combined using a fixed-effects model. Overall, there was a statistically significant increase in the risk of death (164 deaths in the HBBS-treated groups and 123 deaths in the control groups; relative risk [RR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.61) and risk of MI (59 MIs in the HBBS-treated groups and 16 MIs in the control groups; RR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.67-4.40) with these HBBSs. Subgroup analysis of these trials indicated the increased risk was not restricted to a particular HBBS or clinical indication.

Conclusion Based on the available data, use of HBBSs is associated with a significantly increased risk of death and MI.

source : http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=181940

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Vascular Turbine Generates Power From Arterial Blood Flow

Vascular Turbine Generates Power From Arterial Blood Flow

Vascular Turbine Generates Power From Arterial Blood Flow

Vascular turbine could generate enough power to recharge pacemakers; blood clots a potential problem

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Coaches admire athletes for showing a lot of heart, and poets praise the organ’s passions, but engineers see the human cardiovascular system otherwise. The heart is a pump in a prime location, brimming with energy for the taking, says biomedical engineer Alois Pfenniger. So together with colleagues at the University of Bern and the Bern University of Applied Sciences, in Switzerland, Pfenniger has tested small turbines designed to fit inside a human artery, like an implantable hydroelectric generator.

“The heart produces around 1 or 1.5 watts of hydraulic power, and we want to take maybe one milliwatt,” Pfenniger explains. “A pacemaker only needs around 10 microwatts.” At the Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology conference in Lucerne, Switzerland, earlier this month, Pfenniger presented results from a trial in which a tube is designed to mimic the internal thoracic artery, a millimeters-wide vessel that doctors sometimes cannibalize for surgery because it is redundant. The most efficient of the three off-the-shelf turbines he tested produced around 800 microwatts, which could run devices much more power hungry than today’s pacemakers.

Blood-pressure sensors, drug-delivery pumps, or neurostimulators could all benefit from an independent power supply. These devices are already implanted in many people, but each requires a replaceable battery or a cable to keep the power flowing. Miniaturizing such devices and eliminating cables could allow surgeons to implant them in ways that improve blood flow, reduce side effects, and add new functions. Self-contained devices could also monitor vital signs with unprecedented continuity, Pfenniger suggests.

But attendees at the meeting raised a heart-stopping possibility: Could the turbine’s turbulence provoke a blood clot? When blood gets trapped in eddies, it starts to coagulate. Pfenniger’s research showed that all three turbines produced some turbulence, though in differing amounts, and he and his colleagues acknowledge that they’ll have to address turbulence to avoid blood clots. They may try a different design or tweak an existing design, using computer simulations to improve it.

A competing design by electrophysiologist Paul Roberts of Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust avoids that problem because it does not have a rotating part in the path of the blood flow. Instead, it’s attached to a pacemaker lead, and it works by using the blood pressure changes of a heart beating to move a magnet back and forth. But a prototype tested in a pig produced only about one-fifth of the energy a pacemaker needs—much less than Pfenniger’s turbine. Roberts has discussed commercializing his device with potential business partners; he is currently seeking government funding to improve it.

Similarly, Dan Gelvan, CEO of Sirius Implantable Systems, acquired a patent for extracting energy from the circulatory system in 2005. But Gelvan’s device, which was also tested in animals, uses a piezoelectric transducer located alongside moving organs instead of inside an artery. Gelvan says that for systems such as his, “the most important challenge is that you’re working with low-frequency, highly variable systems.”

Other research groups are experimenting with still more ways of scavenging energy from the pulse of arteries, the temperature gradients inside the body, and other neglected power sources. “The drive for all of this is to potentially reduce sizes of devices,” Roberts says, “and equally to accommodate increasing demands placed on devices, such as more diagnostics and wireless communications.”

A correction to this article was made on 23 May 2011.

About the Author

Lucas Laursen is a freelance journalist based in Zurich. In the September 2010 issue of IEEE Spectrum, he wrote about a computer system that warns farmers when laying hens are going to start murderous rampages.

Swiss scientists designed a small blood-powered turbine that would fit in arteries and power internal electronics like a pacemaker. Each turbine can produce 800 microwatts of energy which is far greater than the ten microwatts used by a pacemaker.

This Is a Blood-Powered Heart Turbine The implantable device would function like a mini hydroelectric generator that uses your blood instead of water. As long as your heart is beating, the turbine will generate an endless supply of power. Eventually, this technology could replace battery-powered pacemakers which have a limited life span. Don’t worry about having to give up a major blood vessel as the device would be placed in the thoracic artery, an extra blood vessel often removed in heart surgery.

Though promising, the mini-turbines have one major drawback — life-threatening blood clots! The team is looking at ways to cut the risk of blood clots, but that would be one heck of a side effect to have to list on the product information sheet.

Researchers from the University of Bern and the Bern University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland, are working on small turbines designed to fit inside a human artery, like an implantable hydroelectric generator. They could potentially power pacemakers and other electrical devices within the human body. The device in its current iteration produces 800 microwatts of electricity and fits within a regular sized artery. A major concern, as with any intravascular device, is avoiding coagulation and thrombus formation due to the turbulence caused by the device. Testing still happens in the laboratory, so it will be a few years before we will be able to implant anything like this in humans. From IEEE Spectrum:

“The heart produces around 1 or 1.5 watts of hydraulic power, and we want to take maybe one milliwatt,” Pfenniger explains. “A pacemaker only needs around 10 microwatts.” At the Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology conference in Lucerne, Switzerland, earlier this month, Pfenniger presented results from a trial in which a tube is designed to mimic the internal thoracic artery, a millimeters-wide vessel that doctors sometimes cannibalize for surgery because it is redundant. The most efficient of the three off-the-shelf turbines he tested produced around 800 microwatts, which could run devices much more power hungry than today’s pacemakers.

Blood-pressure sensors, drug-delivery pumps, or neurostimulators could all benefit from an independent power supply. These devices are already implanted in many people, but each requires a replaceable battery or a cable to keep the power flowing. Miniaturizing such devices and eliminating cables could allow surgeons to implant them in ways that improve blood flow, reduce side effects, and add new functions. Self-contained devices could also monitor vital signs with unprecedented continuity, Pfenniger suggests.

Source : http://spectrum.ieee.org/biomedical/devices/swiss-scientists-design-a-turbine-to-fit-in-human-arteries

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St. Jude’s Portico Transcatheter Aortic Valve Receives CE Mark

St. Jude’s Portico Transcatheter Aortic Valve Receives CE Mark

St. Jude’s Portico Transcatheter Aortic Valve Receives CE Mark

St. Jude Medical has just announced the first successful human implantation of the company’s Portico transcatheter aortic heart valve in a patient with aortic stenosis. The procedure was performed by Dr. John Webb, director of cardiac catheterization and interventional cardiology at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia. We hear that St.Jude is working hard to make sure the device is safe and secure, so things like perivalvular leaks and valve displacements do not happen during or after implantation. 38djjjlj St. Judes Portico Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implanted in Human (Exclusive Pics)Furthermore, the company is looking into ways to develop both transapical and transfemoral deliveries for the valve. And, in addition, the device, when it is finally approved, might feature the company’s proprietary Linx anticalcification technology that might actually prolong the life of the device and/or prevent calcium buildup and things like embolizations.

Check our exclusive images of the device, and here’s more info about it from the announcement:

The valve, which is made of bovine pericardial tissue, is designed to increase physicians’ control and placement accuracy during valve deployment. The Portico transcatheter heart valve can be completely resheathed (the process of bringing the valve back into the delivery catheter) and retrieved before it is released from the delivery system, allowing physicians to reposition the valve at the implant site. No transcatheter valve currently on the market has the ability to be re-sheathed, repositioned, or retrieved.

The St. Jude Medical transcatheter heart valve was designed for the estimated 400,000 patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered to be high risk or inoperable for conventional open-heart valve replacement therapy. Two delivery methods will be available for the Portico valve, transfemoral (delivered via the femoral artery) and transapical (delivered via a small incision in the apex of the left ventricle).

Commenting on the first implant, Dr. Gregory Fontana, professor and vice chairman, Department of Surgery at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, Calif., said, “Many of the shortcomings of first generation devices have been addressed with the next generation St. Jude Medical Portico transcatheter valve.”

In February 2010, St. Jude Medical announced that Dr. Fontana, and Dr. Raj Makkar, director of the Interventional Cardiology and Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, will be the principal investigators in the company’s transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) clinical trial. The study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of the St. Jude Medical transcatheter aortic valve for patients who experience severe aortic stenosis and who may be at an elevated risk for open-heart surgery.

St. Jude Medical Announces European Approval of the Portico Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve

ST. PAUL, Minn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Nov. 19, 2012– St. Jude Medical, Inc. (NYSE:STJ), a global medical device company, today announced it has received European CE Mark approval for its 23 mm Portico™ Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve and Transfemoral Delivery System. Designed for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered to be inoperable or high risk for conventional open-heart valve replacement surgery, the Portico valve is implanted through a small incision in the femoral artery (the main artery of the leg). The procedure uses a catheter placed percutaneously (through the skin) to deliver and position the valve in the heart and occurs while the heart continues to beat. This avoids the need to place the patient on cardiopulmonary bypass, a process in which a machine takes over heart and lung function during surgery.

23 mm Portico(TM) Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve – Image courtesy of St. Jude Medical.

23 mm Portico(TM) Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve – Image courtesy of St. Jude Medical.

The Portico device is the only approved transcatheter valve that can be completely resheathed (the process of bringing the valve back into the delivery catheter), repositioned at the implant site or retrieved before it is released from the delivery system. The valve was designed in collaboration with leading physicians to address limitations of current-generation devices by improving control and accuracy in positioning and placement of the valve, minimizing paravalvular leak (a common complication with first-generation transcatheter valves) and potentially reducing the need for the implantation of a permanent pacemaker after the procedure.

“The ability to completely resheath, reposition or retrieve the Portico valve is an important improvement over previous-generation transcatheter valves,” said Dr. Ganesh Manoharan of Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast, U.K. “This is particularly helpful in ensuring accurate placement of the valve and minimizing complications for this high risk population.”

Featuring leaflets made of bovine pericardial tissue attached to a self-expanding stent, the Portico valve was designed to help increase physician control and placement accuracy during deployment of the valve.

“The European approval of the Portico transcatheter valve signals the imminent availability of a next-generation treatment option that can help improve quality of life for patients with diseased or damaged aortic heart valves,” said Frank J. Callaghan, president of the St. Jude Medical Cardiovascular and Ablation Technologies Division. “It also represents a key milestone for St. Jude Medical’s transcatheter heart valve program, and exemplifies our focus on developing technologies that advance the practice of medicine.”

Dr. Manoharan recently presented first-in-human (FIH) 12-month data demonstrating the safety and efficacy of the Portico transcatheter heart valve at the 24th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium, sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation. In the study, there were no vascular complications, major strokes or deaths among study patients and no new pacemakers required. Clinical improvements that were noted at earlier follow-up intervals were sustained out to 12 months (including valve function).

St. Jude Medical also intends to begin a European study of the 25 mm valve to support CE Mark approval before the end of the year.

For additional information about the Portico valve visit SJMPortico.com.

About St. Jude Medical

St. Jude Medical develops medical technology and services that focus on putting more control into the hands of those who treat cardiac, neurological and chronic pain patients worldwide. The company is dedicated to advancing the practice of medicine by reducing risk wherever possible and contributing to successful outcomes for every patient. St. Jude Medical is headquartered in St. Paul, Minn. and has four major focus areas that include: cardiac rhythm management, atrial fibrillation, cardiovascular and neuromodulation. For more information, please visit sjm.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

This news release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 that involve risks and uncertainties. Such forward-looking statements include the expectations, plans and prospects for the Company, including potential clinical successes, anticipated regulatory approvals and future product launches, and projected revenues, margins, earnings and market shares. The statements made by the Company are based upon management’s current expectations and are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include market conditions and other factors beyond the Company’s control and the risk factors and other cautionary statements described in the Company’s filings with the SEC, including those described in the Risk Factors and Cautionary Statements sections of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011 and Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended September 29, 2012. The Company does not intend to update these statements and undertakes no duty to any person to provide any such update under any circumstance.

Comprehensive Approach, Accurate Placement

The Portico system provides a unique, truly comprehensive approach to aortic valve implantation designed to optimize outcomes with:

Full resheathability*

Positioning flexibility to improve placement accuracy

Minimal protrusion into the LVOT

Ability to retrieve* the valve if needed

Targeted Placement

Uniquely Designed for Positioning to Address the Risk of Heart Block and PV Leak

Designed to address conduction system interference by placing the valve low within the stent frame which allows for sealing without the valve extending deep into the LVOT

The large cells in the annulus section of the stent are designed to minimize the risk of PV Leak:

Less metal – minimizing the potential of a stent strut resting against a calcific nodule

More tissue – allowing the tissue to conform around calcific nodules

Efficient Loading and Prep

Unique loading tools allow for fast and easy valve loading and prep

Loading and prep are performed at room temperature

Total rinse time for the valve is only 20 seconds

Source : http://investors.sjm.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=73836&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1760178

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Illumina Offers Personalized Eco Real-Time PCR System

Illumina Offers Personalized Eco Real-Time PCR System

Illumina Offers Personalized Eco Real-Time PCR System

The Eco Real-Time PCR System is sold direct by Illumina in the United States and via distributor partners elsewhere. Other Illumina systems continue to be sold via our standard channels. For a complete list of Eco Real-Time PCR partners, view our Eco Distributors page.

Once you get your own, you want to make it your own and we make it easy for you to do that with Eco System Skins.

The Eco Real-Time PCR System from Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA, offers four-color multiplex analysis of 48 samples per run, and more important, it can be styled with any of your favorite skins. Just peel and apply a new skin when you are ready for a change.

A stable temperature control is essential for the amplification process, especially during denaturation and annealing steps. The Eco Real-Time PCR System provides complete uniform control and quickly cycles form one temperature step to the next.

The heating system consists of a hollow silver block that is heated and cooled by a single Peltier device. This hermetically sealed hollow block contains a conductive fluid and two opposing agitators driven by electromagnetic motors. During thermocycling, these agitators rapidly circulate the fluid throughout the block, transferring heat from the Peltier device evenly across the block. This new method eliminates thermal variation at block edges, providing a thermal performance of ± 0.1°C well-to-well uniformity across the whole sample plate. Typical run time for a 40-cycle PCR protocol average is less than 40 minutes.

The optical system for fluorescence detection facilitates four-color multiplex applications. It’s calibrated for use with SYBR, FAM, HEX, VIC, ROX, and Cy5, but can be used with other real-time PCR chemistry.

For excitation, two panels of 48 fixed LEDs provide fluorescent dye excitation over a broad spectrum. Each of the samples is individually illuminated to minimize cross-talk between wells. On the detection side, the optical system enables real-time detection of up to four targets in a single reaction. Standard melt curve and HRM analysis protocols support continuous data acquisition in a single dye channel during the melt for increased data collection and reduced run times.

United States customer orders for Illumina’s qPCR portfolio through VWR will be accepted starting December 1, 2012.

Source : http://www.ecoqpcr.com/index.ilmn

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Artificial Liver Culture as Platform for Hep C Research

Artificial Liver Culture as Platform for Hep C Research

Artificial Liver Culture as Platform for Hep C Research

A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researcher has developed the first tissue culture of normal, human liver cells that can model infection with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and provide a realistic environment to evaluate possible treatments. The novel cell line, described in the July 16 issue of PLoS ONE, will allow pharmaceutical companies to effectively test new drug candidates or possible vaccines for the HCV infection, which afflicts about 170 million people worldwide. Currently, there is no animal model that is effective for testing such therapies.

Assistant Professor of Medicine Martina Buck, Ph.D., researcher at UC San Diego’s Department of Medicine and Moores UCSD Cancer Center developed the novel culture system, which mimics the biology of HCV infection in humans.

“This is the first efficient and consistent model system for HCV to be developed,” said Buck, adding that it will now enable researchers not only to conduct mechanistic experiments in culture, such as blocking the virus pathways, but also to more effectively screen possible therapies for HCV. “There is a need for new treatments, and for development of a possible vaccine for HCV. Now we have a model system to support work by investigators in this area.”

Currently, there is only a single treatment for HCV, PEG- interferon-?. The drug combination has an average response rate of about 50 percent in HCV cases, but it is much lower than that, closer to 20 percent, in individuals with liver cirrhosis. It can also cause severe flu-like side effects. Approximately 10,000 deaths due to cirrhosis of the liver and several thousand more from liver cancer are attributed to HCV infection in the United States each year.

The HCV life cycle is only partially understood because, until now, it has not been possible to efficiently infect normal human hepatocytes, or liver cells, in culture. According to Buck, the valuable Huh-7 system currently in use to test HCV uses cloned, synthetic HCV RNA expressed from liver tumor cells. These cells cannot be infected with naturally occurring HCV obtained from infected patients.

In contrast, the culture developed by the UCSD scientists allows direct infection with HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 from the blood of HCV-infected patients. This system will enable researchers to study the complete viral lifecycle in its normal host cell, providing novel scientific opportunities. The study reports that the system has been tested using over 30 virus donors as well as multiple donors of hepatocytes, with the production of infectious HCV for all genotypes tested.

This work was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Veterans Affairs (Merit Review) and the Medical Research Foundation at UC San Diego. Buck is a recipient of the Howard Temin Award from the National Cancer Institute.

A solarised image of an adult Chinese liver fluke (Chlonorcis sinensis) showing internal structures.The dark pink branching organs at the left hand end (the rear) are the testes and the central branching brownand red structure is the uterus full of eggs. Yolk for the eggs is produced in the vitellaria, the purple structures along the central edges of the fluke. The oral sucker is at the right hand end of the fluke and surrounds the mouth. The mouth opens into the pharynx (blue), which pumps the food into the two branches of the intestine. The length of the fluke is approximately 13mm.

At the UCSD School of Medicine researchers have developed a tissue culture that can model the behavior of a HCV infected liver.

“This is the first efficient and consistent model system for HCV to be developed,” said Buck [Martina Buck, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine at UC San Diego’s Department of Medicine and Moores UCSD Cancer Center --ed.], adding that it will now enable researchers not only to conduct mechanistic experiments in culture, such as blocking the virus pathways, but also to more effectively screen possible therapies for HCV. “There is a need for new treatments, and for development of a possible vaccine for HCV. Now we have a model system to support work by investigators in this area.”

Currently, there is only a single treatment for HCV, PEG- interferon-?. The drug combination has an average response rate of about 50 percent in HCV cases, but it is much lower than that, closer to 20 percent, in individuals with liver cirrhosis. It can also cause severe flu-like side effects. Approximately 10,000 deaths due to cirrhosis of the liver and several thousand more from liver cancer are attributed to HCV infection in the United States each year.

The HCV life cycle is only partially understood because, until now, it has not been possible to efficiently infect normal human hepatocytes, or liver cells, in culture. According to Buck, the valuable Huh-7 system currently in use to test HCV uses cloned, synthetic HCV RNA expressed from liver tumor cells. These cells cannot be infected with naturally occurring HCV obtained from infected patients.

In contrast, the culture developed by the UCSD scientists allows direct infection with HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 from the blood of HCV-infected patients. This system will enable researchers to study the complete viral lifecycle in its normal host cell, providing novel scientific opportunities. The study reports that the system has been tested using over 30 virus donors as well as multiple donors of hepatocytes, with the production of infectious HCV for all genotypes tested.

Source : http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/newsrel/health/07-08HepatitisC.asp

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Neuro PBV IR from Siemens Monitors Intracranial Parenchymal Blood Flows

Neuro PBV IR from Siemens Monitors Intracranial Parenchymal Blood Flows

Neuro PBV IR from Siemens Monitors Intracranial Parenchymal Blood Flows

New functional imaging for interventional neuroradiology:

syngo Neuro PBV IR displays cerebral blood flow during interventional procedures

With syngo Neuro PBV IR (Parenchymal Blood Volume, Interventional Suite), Siemens

Healthcare has developed a new application for interventional radiology that allows you to

review parenchymal blood flow during minimally invasive interventions in the brain for the

first time. This feature assists the neuroradiologist in the treatment of stroke patients by

displaying the condition of the cerebral tissue directly in the angio suite. syngo Neuro PBV

IR further expands the Siemens imaging application portfolio for Artis zee, the Siemens

systems for interventional radiology and cardiology.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), approximately 15 million people suffer from

stroke every year. A stroke results from decreased blood flow in the brain, which frequently causes

irreparable damage of the cerebral tissue. The earlier a stroke is treated, the larger the chance that

as little brain tissue as possible is destroyed. To further shorten the time from diagnosis to

treatment, Siemens Healthcare has developed the software syngo Neuro PBV IR, which directly

displays the status of the cerebral tissue during minimally invasive procedures. Minimally invasive

techniques for stroke treatment involve the use of a thin catheter within the arteries of the brain to

either deliver a drug to dissolve the blood clot or a special catheter to mechanically remove it.

Syngo Neuro PBV IR for the first time provides neuroradiologists with current information about the

status of the brain tissue during minimally invasive procedures. This not only results in clinical

advantages for stroke treatment, but is equally helpful for tumor biopsy and treatment, tissue

embolization, and vasospasm therapy (spasms of blood vessels).

Another benefit of the new Siemens software is that it is capable of providing blood volume data for

the whole brain, unlike traditional CT acquisition, and allows the clinician to review the information

from any orientation, axial, coronal, sagittal etc. Syngo Neuro PBV IR uses cone-beam CT

1 / 2

Siemens AG

Corporate Communications and Government Affairs

Wittelsbacherplatz 2, 80333 Munich

Germany

Information number: HIM201002.023e fp

Media Relations: Marion Bludszuweit

Phone: +49 9131 84-3292

E-mail: marion.bludszuweit@siemens.com

Siemens AG

Healthcare Sector – IM Division

Henkestr. 127, 91052 Erlangen

technology (syngo DynaCT) to acquire the information required for such advanced tissue

visualization. This proprietary Siemens development from 2004 led to a paradigm shift in

angiographic imaging, introducing the ability to view cross sectional soft tissue information with an

angiographic C-arm system for the first time.

All that is required to generate the PBV information is two C-arm rotations around the patient and a

steady state contrast injection. The sophisticated processing algorithms of the system use the

resulting data to generate a neurological PBV map. The information is available at tableside, in

less than 40 seconds, without the need for any further user interaction.

Syngo Neuro PBV IR further expands the Siemens imaging application portfolio for Artis zee. Artis

zee is the product family name of Siemens systems used for interventional radiology and

cardiology. These systems are available in biplane, multi-axial, ceiling-mounted, floor-mounted,

and multi-functional configurations.

Syngo Neuro PBV IR is the second functional imaging application for the Artis zee portfolio after

the successful launch of syngo iFlow. The application syngo iFlow allows for the display of the

functional information inherent in a digital subtraction angiography (DSA) series in a single color

image.Syngo Neuro PBV IR was first introduced to the public at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the

Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Images can be found at:

http://www.siemens.com/med-picture/syngo-Neuro-PBV-IR

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world’s largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter in

medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics, medical information technology and hearing aids. Siemens offers its customers

products and solutions for the entire range of patient care from a single source – from prevention and early detection to

diagnosis, and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows for the most common diseases, Siemens

also makes healthcare faster, better and more cost-effective. Siemens Healthcare employs some 48,000 employees

worldwide and operates around the world. In fiscal year 2009 (to September 30), the Sector posted revenue of 11.9

billion euros and profit of around 1.5 billion euros. For further information please visit: www.siemens.com/healthcare.

Siemens has just announced the release of the Neuro PBV IR computed tomography suite that provides a live look of inracranial blood flows for neuroradiologists performing clot lyses, stent placements, ablations, etc.

With syngo Neuro PBV IR (Parenchymal Blood Volume, Interventional Suite), Siemens Healthcare has developed a new application for interventional radiology that allows you to review parenchymal blood flow during minimally invasive interventions in the brain for the first time. This feature assists the neuroradiologist in the treatment of stroke patients by displaying the condition of the cerebral tissue directly in the angio suite.

This not only results in clinical advantages for stroke treatment, but is equally helpful for tumor biopsy and treatment, tissue embolization, and vasospasm therapy (spasms of blood vessels).

Another benefit of the new Siemens software is that it is capable of providing blood volume data for the whole brain, unlike traditional CT acquisition, and allows the clinician to review the information from any orientation, axial, coronal, sagittal etc. Syngo Neuro PBV IR uses cone-beam CT technology (syngo DynaCT) to acquire the information required for such advanced tissue visualization.

All that is required to generate the PBV information is two C-arm rotations around the patient and a steady state contrast injection. The sophisticated processing algorithms of the system use the resulting data to generate a neurological PBV map. The information is available at tableside, in less than 40 seconds, without the need for any further user interaction.

Source : http://www.siemens.com/press/pool/de/pressemitteilungen/2010/imaging_it/HIM201002023e.pdf

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