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IRadimed’s MRI Compatible MRidium 3860+ IV Infusion Pump FDA Cleared

IRadimed’s MRI Compatible MRidium 3860+ IV Infusion Pump FDA Cleared

iradimed-pump

 

IRadimed, a company out of Winter Springs, Florida, won FDA clearance for its MRidium 3860+ MRI-compatible IV infusion pump. The device has non-magnetic motor and no ferrous (containing iron) components that would be affected by a magnetic field. It’s safe to use around MRI machines up to 3.0 Tesla, which means just about any scanner found inside a hospital.

mridiumThe device can pump doses from 0.1 mL to 1,400 mL per hour, and so can be used with pediatric and adult patients that may need very different infusion rates.

Thanks to a built-in lithium battery, the device can be self-powered for up to 12 hours at 125 mL per hour.

  • World’s ‘Only’ Non–Magnetic IV Infusion Pump
  • Placement up to the 10,000 Gauss Line
  • Intuitive Smart IV Pump technology reduces field errors
  • Expandable to a second infusion channel
  • Masimo™ SpO2 Patient Monitoring
  • Large 10-Numeric Keypad – Quick Programming
  • Infusion Range – 0.1 to 1400 mL/Hr
  • Over 12–Hour Battery at 125mL/Hr
  • Adjustable KVO Rate
  • Upstream / Downstream Occlusion Detection
  • Air-in-Line Detection
  • Delivery via Syringe, Bag or Bottle

Product page: MRidium 3860+…

Via: IRadimed…

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The Complete Anatomy Platform: An Interview with Niall Johnston, President of 3D4Medical

The Complete Anatomy Platform: An Interview with Niall Johnston, President of 3D4Medical

3d4medical

 

3D4Medical‘s (Dublin, Ireland) award-winning Complete Anatomy digital educational platform facilitates the exploration of human anatomical characteristics that are difficult to visualize via traditional methods or without hands-on training. The system, widely employed in medical education at the university level, offers students and educators a unique opportunity to investigate bodily systems, features, and conditions virtually with unprecedented precision and interactive control. Niall Johnston, the President of 3D4Medical, was kind enough to sit down with the Medgadget team recently to discuss his platform’s technology, its success to date in the market, and what’s to come.

Niall is a seasoned management executive who has extensive experience both nationally and internationally in hardware services and software industries. Upon emigrating to the United States following receipt of his 1989 Bachelors in Commerce degree from University College Galway, Niall established a noteworthy career working in sales for MicroAge. He quickly demonstrated an ability and affinity for growing teams, and progressed into senior sales and general management positions with significant operating budgets and revenue streams. Niall took the helm of MicroAge UK in 1999 and rapidly turned a loss-making venture into a profitable business. After a brief time in Ireland helping a fledgling eLearning company, Niall returned to the US in 2002 and setup his own company to help small Irish businesses establish their US presence. While running Seezn Technology, Niall met John Moore. The duo went on to form 3D4Medical in 2005. Our interview with Niall is reproduced below in full.

 

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Zach Kaufman, MedgadgetAs we start off here, is there anything specific about 3D4Medical’s Complete Anatomy education tool that you would like to share with our readership?

Niall Johnston, 3D4Medical: Complete Anatomy is transforming how anatomy and physiology is studied in academic institutions across the world, allowing students to investigate every minute detail of the anatomy in incredible 3D. In the comfort of the 3D world, users can explore the anatomy by zooming to minutiae; rotating to every angle; cutting through structures and discovering what is behind every layer.

spine-3dThey can access vast libraries of anatomical information and watch 3D lectures and animations on anatomy-specific topics. They can simulate disease states by adding fractures, growths, bone spurs and pain sites – all without any of the blood and tissue usually associated with such exploration or cadaveric dissection. Users can create screens/recordings/quizzes using the tools mentioned above and share this content via the cloud-based platform to other groups of users.

In addition, a powerful tool within the app is the ground-breaking Lecture Builder feature, which allows educators to create custom lectures incorporating 3D4Medical lecture material and/or the educator’s own material. They can also add audio, import MRIs or X-rays and integrate them into their lectures.

A big focus for us at 3D4Medical is personalisation and, together, Complete Anatomy and Lecture Builder make the teaching and learning of anatomy a collaborative, yet highly-personalised, experience. These lectures are delivered to students via the cloud-based platform where they can consume the materials and still be part of an interactive learning environment.

We are also partnering with leading anatomists worldwide who are helping 3D4Medical create content in areas such as histology, radiology, cadaveric imagery, clinical correlates, physiology to name a few. This cloud-based platform is being tested in nearly 100 medical schools worldwide already, despite the fact that Lecture Builder was only released 4 months ago.

 

Medgadget: Speaking generally, would you mind telling me a bit about the platform? What are the most significant benefits of using Complete Anatomy as opposed to more traditional methods for learning and understanding complex anatomical information?

Johnston: Anatomy is an exhilarating and beautiful subject; however, it often proves to be a challenging topic for students to grasp.

Challenges reside in the fact that a deep anatomical understanding requires the student to envisage and manipulate a structure in their mind and then go on to use that knowledge in clinical practice. Until recently, the education of medicine and related fields has been solely through cumbersome and dense medical textbooks written almost 100 years ago, skeletons, elusive cadavers and rote-memorisation of body parts, none of which allow the student to fully grasp the magnificence of a beating heart, a pumping blood vessel or a moving muscle.

Complete Anatomy takes anatomical learning to another level and makes it a highly dynamic, interactive and engaging experience. The 3D world of Complete Anatomy and the level of detail provided for the user means that the user can grasp the anatomical detail of a specific structure without having to cut into a cadaver or be present at a procedure. The user can go behind all the blood and fascia and gain a full and proper appreciation of an entire anatomical structure and its relationship to those structures and systems surrounding it. The user can learn about the various systems of the body, how blood and nerve supplies move around the body and how the various systems interact, all in the comfort and convenience of a mobile platform and at their own pace.

 

Medgadget: Is there a particular anatomical system or application that is difficult to learn via traditional methods for which the software is especially helpful?

back-3dJohnston: Anatomy can be a difficult subject to grasp, primarily due to the fact that many of the structures are hidden away from the world amongst a complex network of skin, flesh, bones, muscles, arteries and fascia.

Although the opportunity to dissect and examine cadavers is a wonderful resource for medical students, the cadavers themselves are, of course, very different to a living body. Storage and maintenance costs are high. Studies have also shown that many students suffer PTSD-like symptoms due to the difficult emotional aspect of dissection, with 96% of US medical schools holding post-dissection ceremonies to honour the donors and help the students to process their emotions.

Our objective, however, is not to replace cadaveric dissection but to complement it with dynamic and engaging tools that can aid in the education process. Complete Anatomy removes all such concerns and restrictions and instead provides an interactive platform upon which students can completely strip back and closely examine every minute detail of the human anatomy in highly intricate and engaging 3D detail, where they can manipulate views, isolate entire systems and specific parts thereof, cut into specific structures and simulate disease states and areas of pain.

The quality of a student’s learning experience is infinitely improved across the board – the level of detail to which they are exposed is far superior to any other educational tool at their disposal; their interaction and engagement is richer and deeper, in turn contributing to a greater and more practical understanding of the anatomy and easier and more instant access to information leads to better use of student time.

 

Medgadget: What has enabled and inspired you to develop and release this product at this time? For example, was this a tool simply awaiting advancements in technical capability that made it possible? Or was this designed in response to perceived shortcomings in medical education?

Johnston: The student of today is very different than before. Their native language is digital; their preferred medium is digital; their world is digital. Methods of education must respond to this. Flat 2D imaging has been the best on offer in the past but times have changed and the magnificence of 3D is transformative. The digital landscape is itself constantly evolving, becoming more interactive and engaging by the minute. Complete Anatomy has embraced both the societal shift and the technology available, allowing the user to experience anatomy like never before.

 

Medgadget: Would you please describe the development process and timeline? Whose input helped to shape the technology? What anatomical ‘truth’ is the Complete Anatomy educational platform based on? What types of continued development, upgrade, and update projects are ongoing?

heart-3dJohnston: The concept of Complete Anatomy evolved from various enterprises over the past number of years, originating in the field of anatomical imaging for pharmaceutical companies before moving into the realm of medical apps. Since 2012, the company has been working on building the magnificent medical technology 3D platform that we have today and which has had more than 12 million downloads. The input of the various academic and medical experts that have come on board, together with our Advisory Board and Medical Review Board, has been crucial to the development of Complete Anatomy: their knowledge, experience and wisdom has been invaluable. Complete Anatomy is constantly being developed and updated, with an update approximately every 12 weeks.

 

Medgadget: I see that the Complete Anatomy application garnered a prestigious Apple Design Award earlier this year. Congratulations! Would you speak to the importance of design to the technology?

Johnston: Design is about solving a problem. At 3D4Medical, we are transforming medical learning (and practice), bringing it into the digital landscape of the 21st-century. We do this by developing the most cutting-edge innovative technology and filtering it through a refined user-interface design process in order to harness and present it in a way that is intuitive to use.  For 3D4Medical, innovation and design are integral to our work: with the level of detail and anatomical complexity that we deal with in our software, good clean design is critical to help our user to navigate seamlessly through the abundance of information that we put at their fingertips.  The technology opens the door to a whole new 3D world, with the ability to explore the human anatomy like never before and the smart design is the key. The recognition that we have received from Apple in the form of an Apple Design Award 2016 was something very special for the team.

 

Medgadget: Do you have any data and/or observational findings comparing the effectiveness of using theComplete Anatomy software or other digital learning techniques to live lecture presentations?

Johnston: The emergence of mobile technologies in recent years has triggered an academic shift in the world of medical education from the more traditional methods to mobile learning. Digital is becoming increasingly prevalent in the practice of medicine and students must be equipped for this. It was estimated in 2012 that nearly 25% of medical schools in the US had incorporated iPads as educational tools. A study completed in March 2016 found that the main advantages of iPads in medical learning included instant and constant access to information and resources, portability, ease of use and efficient time management. Other advantages of note are the cost-savings across the board on textbooks, paper and various other physical study aids.

face-anatomyComplete Anatomy has been rolled-out in a number of schools to date and, although the digital landscape is more native to the younger generations of today, is proving a major success with both tutors and students.

To quote Dr. Erin Fillmore, Anatomy Lecturer at Buckingham University, “It’s hard to argue against the fact that anatomy is a profession steeped in history, a history grounded in using traditional cadaveric dissection in order to understand the complexity of the human body. However, in an age where dissection is not always feasible and mobile digital learning aides are beginning to cleverly bridge the gap between real dissection and electronic representation, one cannot ignore the evolving tools in our profession. That is why we at the University of Buckingham Medical School decided to implement 3D4Medical’s Complete Anatomy into our integrated curriculum and it has proven to be a fantastic decision.”

In addition, there are a number of current studies that are measuring many different issues relating to both Complete Anatomy and Lecture Builder. We have nothing published yet but it won’t be long.

 

Medgadget: It seems to me that your software is largely marketed to students. Is there value for existing medical professionals? If so, in what ways might the technology be most useful?

Johnston: Complete Anatomy is a product that greatly benefits educators, students, medical professionals and patients. It allows medical professionals to illustrate to a patient the precise details of an anatomical issue in 3D, how certain motion might affect or exacerbate an issue and how and why particular exercises or treatment might improve matters. Interestingly, it was indeed the medical profession’s widespread use of the platform that led to the development of 3D4Medical’s Complete Ortho, which will launch in Q1 2017.

In addition, the precise knowledge that a medical professional must retain is colossal: Complete Anatomy serves as an incredibly powerful anatomical reference tool, allowing users to reference anatomical names, 3D animations, explanatory details, system interactions and refresh their understanding of same all at the touch of a screen. The ease of use of the platform in comparison to the laborious task of searching through medical texts and reference material is unquestionably incomparable.

 

Medgadget:  You mentioned earlier the Lecture Builder feature, and we spoke offline about future versions of the software design for educators and/or as clinical solutions as well. Could you speak to those future plans?

skull-bonesJohnston: Building upon the interactive cutting-edge learning tools of Complete Anatomy, Lecture Builder allows educators to create Complete Anatomy lectures, incorporating their own anatomical simulations and manipulations using the various learning tools and adding lecture-specific text and relevant imaging such as MRIs and x-rays. Audio can also be layered over the lecture to guide the student through the material and a content-specific quiz can be included to allow the student to check their learning.

Using the revolutionary cloud-based sharing function, Lecture Builder allows the educator to then push the custom lectures to their various groups of students for uniquely tailored and ultra-convenient learning.

In terms of clinical solutions, 3D4Medical’s Complete Ortho will be the first in a series of clinical applications we will be launching over the next year. It will be launched in Q1 2017 and will transform the doctor/patient relationship, allowing medical professionals to engage with their patients in a more informative, educational and empowering way, all across a fully HIPAA-compliant platform. The patient will be guided through the entire process to recovery (the anatomical issue, pathology and procedure) in incredible 3D, allowing for a greater level of understanding of their issue and the treatment options available to them. This level of shared decision-making, education and empowerment will no doubt lead to a decrease in unnecessary physician revisits, increased patient-satisfaction and better medical outcomes across the board.

 

Medgadget: The adoption of the technology to date has been quite overwhelming. The application, which is now available on desktops, notebooks, and mobile devices, has been used or piloted at, I believe, more than 100 universities in the United States and has been sold more than 12 million times worldwide. My question is, what’s left to accomplish? What does 3D4Medical envision as the successful future for the Complete Anatomy application?

Johnston: Complete Anatomy is currently being piloted in over 100 medical schools around the world, approximately half of which are in the US. Although the power of Complete Anatomy is clear to anyone who sees it in use, the limitations are endless in terms of how it will evolve to ultimately become the platform for medical learning. Some of the features envisaged in the short-term include the addition histology, pathology, radiology and physiology, aiming to vastly increase the suite of learning opportunities that Complete Anatomy will offer. Given the increasing advancements in the areas of virtual, augmented and mixed realities, the sky is the limit for 3D4Medical and Complete Anatomy.

Complete Anatomy is currently compatible with iPad Pro (9.7” and 12″), iPad Air 2, iPad Air, iPad Mini 4 and Mac, with a Windows release due in January 2017.

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Retinal Implants: Advanced Technology is giving blind people back their sight

Retinal Implants: Advanced Technology is giving blind people back their sight

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Retinal implants are biomedical microchips designed to provide visual perception to people who have lost vision owing to degenerative eye diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. These conditions lead to slow degeneration of photoreceptor cells in the retina of human eyes, leading to gradual loss of sight. However, some of the inner retinal neurons capable of transmitting signals from photoreceptors to the brain are preserved in most cases. Electrical stimulation of these remaining retinal neurons with the help of retinal implants, which are essentially microchips containing an array of light-sensitive diodes capable of converting incident light into electrical signals, can help reintroduce some vision to patients.

The report presents a detailed overview of the present state of the global retinal implants market and its crucial elements. It presents an analysis of the major factors that will influence the growth dynamics of the market and shape its future.

Download exclusive Sample of this report:
http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=B&rep_id=10313

The data has been gathered with the help of primary and secondary research methodologies, and narrowed down with the help of industry-leading analytical methods. A definitive account of the regulatory scenario governing market decisions has also been included in the report, along with an analysis of the expected impact of the regulatory scenario on the market.

Retinal Implants Market: Present Scenario

Retinal implants were considered a medical impossibility until a few decades ago, primarily owing to the highly complex design of the human eye. However, some retinal implants have successfully cleared clinical trials and are being regularly used in clinics in developed regions such as Europe and North America.

Retinal implants such as Alpha IMS, developed by Germany-based Retina Implant AG, and Argus II, developed by U.S.-based Second Sight Medical Products, have received approval for large-scale marketing and are being successfully implanted in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

With the rising number of successful outcomes of retinal implants and advancement in technologies, the global retinal implants market holds immense potential in helping patients with RP and several other degenerative conditions regain their sight.

View exclusive Global strategic Business report :
http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/retinal-implant-market.html

Increase in the geriatric population and the consequent rise in the prevalence of degenerative conditions, technological advancements, and growing disposable income in developing countries will act as major drivers of the global retinal implant market in the next few years.

Currently, retinal implants available in the market fall into two categories: epiretinal implants, which are fixed on the retina, and subretinal implants, which are fitted behind the retina. Retinal implants that can be fitted above the vascular choroid, called suprachoroidal implants, are also in clinical trials.

Retinal Implants Market: Challenges and Growth Opportunities

Biocompatibility and long-term stability of the material used for devising retinal implants are the major challenges in the global retinal implants market. These technical challenges have induced manufacturers and researchers to explore the use of new materials and combinations that will be most suitable for human eyes. This factor acts as a major restraint of the market as well as a major opportunity for medical device manufacturers and researchers.

Lack of medical reimbursement in developing and underdeveloped countries is a key issue restraining the global retinal implants market. In Germany, the Alpha IMS microchip is reimbursed by the statutory health insurance system, which insures 90% of the country’s population.

Complex surgery, difference in people’s biological response to foreign objects being placed inside their bodies, and high cost of procedures are the other major challenges faced by the global retinal implants market. Owing to the complex nature of implant surgeries, comprehensive training in the technology and technique and appropriate selection of patients is also a crucial factor governing the large-scale adoption of retinal implants. Dearth of trained professionals in several regions is limiting demand for retinal implants.

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PaQ Three Day Insulin Delivery Device Cleared in Europe

PaQ Three Day Insulin Delivery Device Cleared in Europe

The CeQur device, a small discreet, wearable insulin patch infuser, is for the continuous subcutaneous delivery of rapid acting insulin for the management of type 2 Diabetes mellitus.

The CeQur insulin delivery device is designed to meet the specific needs of people with type 2 diabetes who could benefit from intensive insulin therapy.

Its simple and discrete design may enable patients to more readily experience the benefits of intensive insulin therapy, all while remaining free from multiple daily injections.

The CeQur insulin infuser includes a disposable insulin reservoir that attaches to a reusable electronic messenger. The device easily attaches to the patient’s abdominal area with a safe and secure adhesive backing. Once in place, insulin is delivered subcutaneously through a fine, soft tube or cannula from the reservoir that is changed by the patient every few days.

The CeQur insulin delivery device is designed to use just one type of insulin for both basal and bolus dosing, and will be available in multiple basal rates.

CeQur of Horw, Switzerland received European approval for the PaQ Insulin Delivery Device. The PaQ provides three days of continuous insulin infusion for patients with type 2 diabetes, and also offers the option for users to initiate an extra bolus injection at any time.

The device consists of a disposable insulin container that connects to a reusable electronic component that can provide on-demand information on the status of the PaQ.

From the company announcement:

The CeQur insulin infuser includes a disposable insulin reservoir that attaches to a reusable electronic messenger. The device easily attaches to the patient’s abdominal area with a safe and secure adhesive backing. Once in place, insulin is delivered subcutaneously through a fine, soft tube or cannula from the reservoir that is changed by the patient every few days.

The CeQur insulin delivery device is designed to use just one type of insulin for both basal and bolus dosing, and will be available in multiple basal rates.

Source : http://cequrcorp.com/cequr-device/

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Medgenics’ EPODURE Biopump technology for EPO delivery receives U.S. patent

Medgenics’ EPODURE Biopump technology for EPO delivery receives U.S. patent

Medgenics, Inc. (NYSE Amex: MDGN and AIM: MEDU, MEDG) (the “Company”), the developer of BiopumpTM a novel technology for the sustained production and delivery of therapeutic proteins in patients using their own tissue, today announced a patent granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) protecting the use of Medgenics’ EPODURE Biopump technology for delivery of erythropoietin (EPO). Medgenics is developing EPODURE to address the need for safer, sustained treatment of anemia. The USPTO also allowed claims covering a similar method for delivery of clotting Factor VIII, underlying Medgenics’ HEMODURE™ Biopump technology for sustained prophylactic treatment of hemophilia.

Similar claims covering EPODURE and HEMODURE have also been recently allowed in Japan, China, Korea and Australia.

In total, Medgenics’ global portfolio now includes 36 patents issued, with 81 more pending.

Medgenics believes its approach to protein therapy has multiple benefits compared with current treatments, which include regular and costly injections of therapeutic proteins. Medgenics’ technologies target the global protein therapy market which is forecast to reach $132 billion in 2013.

“As we continue to progress in our clinical trials and move forward in our business development efforts, the protection of our intellectual property becomes critical. We believe that receiving method patents and allowance of key claims for our Biopump™ system for the production and delivery of EPO and Factor VIII proteins increases the value of our intellectual property assets and our company,” stated Andrew L. Pearlman, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Medgenics.

Source : http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121122/Medgenicse28099-EPODURE-Biopump-technology-for-EPO-delivery-receives-US-patent.aspx

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St. Jude’s Portico Transcatheter Aortic Valve Receives CE Mark

St. Jude’s Portico Transcatheter Aortic Valve Receives CE Mark

St. Jude’s Portico Transcatheter Aortic Valve Receives CE Mark

St. Jude Medical has just announced the first successful human implantation of the company’s Portico transcatheter aortic heart valve in a patient with aortic stenosis. The procedure was performed by Dr. John Webb, director of cardiac catheterization and interventional cardiology at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia. We hear that St.Jude is working hard to make sure the device is safe and secure, so things like perivalvular leaks and valve displacements do not happen during or after implantation. 38djjjlj St. Judes Portico Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implanted in Human (Exclusive Pics)Furthermore, the company is looking into ways to develop both transapical and transfemoral deliveries for the valve. And, in addition, the device, when it is finally approved, might feature the company’s proprietary Linx anticalcification technology that might actually prolong the life of the device and/or prevent calcium buildup and things like embolizations.

Check our exclusive images of the device, and here’s more info about it from the announcement:

The valve, which is made of bovine pericardial tissue, is designed to increase physicians’ control and placement accuracy during valve deployment. The Portico transcatheter heart valve can be completely resheathed (the process of bringing the valve back into the delivery catheter) and retrieved before it is released from the delivery system, allowing physicians to reposition the valve at the implant site. No transcatheter valve currently on the market has the ability to be re-sheathed, repositioned, or retrieved.

The St. Jude Medical transcatheter heart valve was designed for the estimated 400,000 patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered to be high risk or inoperable for conventional open-heart valve replacement therapy. Two delivery methods will be available for the Portico valve, transfemoral (delivered via the femoral artery) and transapical (delivered via a small incision in the apex of the left ventricle).

Commenting on the first implant, Dr. Gregory Fontana, professor and vice chairman, Department of Surgery at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, Calif., said, “Many of the shortcomings of first generation devices have been addressed with the next generation St. Jude Medical Portico transcatheter valve.”

In February 2010, St. Jude Medical announced that Dr. Fontana, and Dr. Raj Makkar, director of the Interventional Cardiology and Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, will be the principal investigators in the company’s transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) clinical trial. The study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of the St. Jude Medical transcatheter aortic valve for patients who experience severe aortic stenosis and who may be at an elevated risk for open-heart surgery.

St. Jude Medical Announces European Approval of the Portico Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve

ST. PAUL, Minn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Nov. 19, 2012– St. Jude Medical, Inc. (NYSE:STJ), a global medical device company, today announced it has received European CE Mark approval for its 23 mm Portico™ Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve and Transfemoral Delivery System. Designed for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered to be inoperable or high risk for conventional open-heart valve replacement surgery, the Portico valve is implanted through a small incision in the femoral artery (the main artery of the leg). The procedure uses a catheter placed percutaneously (through the skin) to deliver and position the valve in the heart and occurs while the heart continues to beat. This avoids the need to place the patient on cardiopulmonary bypass, a process in which a machine takes over heart and lung function during surgery.

23 mm Portico(TM) Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve – Image courtesy of St. Jude Medical.

23 mm Portico(TM) Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve – Image courtesy of St. Jude Medical.

The Portico device is the only approved transcatheter valve that can be completely resheathed (the process of bringing the valve back into the delivery catheter), repositioned at the implant site or retrieved before it is released from the delivery system. The valve was designed in collaboration with leading physicians to address limitations of current-generation devices by improving control and accuracy in positioning and placement of the valve, minimizing paravalvular leak (a common complication with first-generation transcatheter valves) and potentially reducing the need for the implantation of a permanent pacemaker after the procedure.

“The ability to completely resheath, reposition or retrieve the Portico valve is an important improvement over previous-generation transcatheter valves,” said Dr. Ganesh Manoharan of Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast, U.K. “This is particularly helpful in ensuring accurate placement of the valve and minimizing complications for this high risk population.”

Featuring leaflets made of bovine pericardial tissue attached to a self-expanding stent, the Portico valve was designed to help increase physician control and placement accuracy during deployment of the valve.

“The European approval of the Portico transcatheter valve signals the imminent availability of a next-generation treatment option that can help improve quality of life for patients with diseased or damaged aortic heart valves,” said Frank J. Callaghan, president of the St. Jude Medical Cardiovascular and Ablation Technologies Division. “It also represents a key milestone for St. Jude Medical’s transcatheter heart valve program, and exemplifies our focus on developing technologies that advance the practice of medicine.”

Dr. Manoharan recently presented first-in-human (FIH) 12-month data demonstrating the safety and efficacy of the Portico transcatheter heart valve at the 24th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium, sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation. In the study, there were no vascular complications, major strokes or deaths among study patients and no new pacemakers required. Clinical improvements that were noted at earlier follow-up intervals were sustained out to 12 months (including valve function).

St. Jude Medical also intends to begin a European study of the 25 mm valve to support CE Mark approval before the end of the year.

For additional information about the Portico valve visit SJMPortico.com.

About St. Jude Medical

St. Jude Medical develops medical technology and services that focus on putting more control into the hands of those who treat cardiac, neurological and chronic pain patients worldwide. The company is dedicated to advancing the practice of medicine by reducing risk wherever possible and contributing to successful outcomes for every patient. St. Jude Medical is headquartered in St. Paul, Minn. and has four major focus areas that include: cardiac rhythm management, atrial fibrillation, cardiovascular and neuromodulation. For more information, please visit sjm.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

This news release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 that involve risks and uncertainties. Such forward-looking statements include the expectations, plans and prospects for the Company, including potential clinical successes, anticipated regulatory approvals and future product launches, and projected revenues, margins, earnings and market shares. The statements made by the Company are based upon management’s current expectations and are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include market conditions and other factors beyond the Company’s control and the risk factors and other cautionary statements described in the Company’s filings with the SEC, including those described in the Risk Factors and Cautionary Statements sections of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011 and Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended September 29, 2012. The Company does not intend to update these statements and undertakes no duty to any person to provide any such update under any circumstance.

Comprehensive Approach, Accurate Placement

The Portico system provides a unique, truly comprehensive approach to aortic valve implantation designed to optimize outcomes with:

Full resheathability*

Positioning flexibility to improve placement accuracy

Minimal protrusion into the LVOT

Ability to retrieve* the valve if needed

Targeted Placement

Uniquely Designed for Positioning to Address the Risk of Heart Block and PV Leak

Designed to address conduction system interference by placing the valve low within the stent frame which allows for sealing without the valve extending deep into the LVOT

The large cells in the annulus section of the stent are designed to minimize the risk of PV Leak:

Less metal – minimizing the potential of a stent strut resting against a calcific nodule

More tissue – allowing the tissue to conform around calcific nodules

Efficient Loading and Prep

Unique loading tools allow for fast and easy valve loading and prep

Loading and prep are performed at room temperature

Total rinse time for the valve is only 20 seconds

Source : http://investors.sjm.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=73836&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1760178

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NIH-funded scientists develop new treatment to combat autoimmune disorders in mouse model

NIH-funded scientists develop new treatment to combat autoimmune disorders in mouse model

In a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS), researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have developed innovative technology to selectively inhibit the part of the immune system responsible for attacking myelin-the insulating material that encases nerve fibers and facilitates electrical communication between brain cells.

Autoimmune disorders occur when T-cells-a type of white blood cell within the immune system-mistake the body’s own tissues for a foreign substance and attack them. Current treatment for autoimmune disorders involves the use of immunosuppressant drugs which tamp down the overall activity of the immune system. However, these medications leave patients susceptible to infections and increase their risk of cancer as the immune system’s normal ability to identify and destroy aberrant cells within the body is compromised.

Supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) at NIH, Drs. Stephen Miller and Lonnie Shea at Northwestern University, Evanston, teamed up with researchers at the University of Sydney, and the Myelin Repair Foundation in Saratoga, Calif. to come up with a novel way of repressing only the part of the immune system that causes autoimmune disorders while leaving the rest of the system intact.

The new research takes advantage of a natural safeguard employed by the body to prevent autoreactive T-cells-which recognize and have the potential to attack the body’s healthy tissues-from becoming active. They report their results in the Nov. 18 online edition of Nature Biotechnology.

“We’re trying to do something that interfaces with the natural processes in the body,” said Shea. “The body has natural mechanisms for shutting down an immune response that is inappropriate, and we’re really just looking to tap into that.”

One of these natural mechanisms involves the ongoing clearance of apoptotic, or dying, cells from the body. When a cell dies, it releases chemicals that attract specific cells of the immune system called macrophages. These macrophages gobble up the dying cell and deliver it to the spleen where it presents self-antigens-tiny portions of proteins from the dying cell-to a pool of T-cells. In order to prevent autoreactive T-cells from being activated, macrophages initiate the repression of any T-cells capable of binding to the self-antigens.

Dr. Miller was the first to demonstrate that by coupling a specific self-antigen such as myelin to apoptotic cells, one could tap into this natural mechanism to suppress T-cells that would normally attack the myelin. The lab spent decades demonstrating that they could generate antigen-specific immune suppression in various animal models of autoimmune diseases. Recently, they initiated a preliminary clinical trial with collaborators in Germany to test the safety of injecting the antigen-bound apoptotic cells into patients with MS. While the trial successfully demonstrated that the injections were safe, it also highlighted a key problem with using cells as a vehicle for antigen delivery:

“Cellular therapy is extremely expensive as it needs to be carried out in a large medical center that has the capability to isolate patient’s white blood cells under sterile conditions and to re-infuse those antigen-coupled cells back into the patients,” said Miller. “It’s a costly, difficult, and time-consuming procedure.”

Thus began a collaboration with Dr. Shea, a bioengineer at Northwestern University, to discuss the possibility of developing a surrogate for the apoptotic cells. After trying out various formulations, his lab successfully linked the desired antigens to microscopic, biodegradable particles which they predicted would be taken up by circulating macrophages similar to apoptotic cells.

Much to their amazement, when tested by the Miller lab, the antigen-bound particles were just as good, if not better, at inducing T-cell tolerance in animal models of autoimmune disorders.

Using their myelin-bound particles, the researchers were able to both prevent the initiation of MS in their mouse model as well as inhibit its progression when injected immediately following the first sign of clinical symptoms.

The research team is now hoping to begin phase I clinical trials using this new technology. The material that makes up the particles has already been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is currently used in resorbable sutures as well as in clinical trials to deliver anti-cancer agents. Miller believes that the proven safety record of these particles along with their ability to be easily produced using good manufacturing practices will make it easier to translate their discovery into clinical use.

“I think we’ve come up with a very potent way to induce tolerance that can be easily translated into clinical practice. We’re doing everything we can now to take this forward,” said Miller.

In addition to its potential use for the treatment of MS, the researchers have shown in the lab that their therapy can induce tolerance for other autoimmune diseases such as type I diabetes and specific food allergies. They also speculate that transplant patients could benefit from the treatment which has the potential to retract the body’s natural immune response against a transplanted organ. Dr. Christine Kelley, NIBIB director of the Division of Science and Technology, points to the unique collaboration between scientists and engineers that made this advance a reality.

“This discovery is testimony to the importance of multidisciplinary research efforts in healthcare,” said Kelley. “The combined expertise of these immunology and bioengineering researchers has resulted in a valuable new perspective on treating autoimmune disorders.”

Source : http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121118/NIH-funded-scientists-develop-new-treatment-to-combat-autoimmune-disorders-in-mouse-model.aspx

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Oramed’s Oral Insulin Moving Through Clinical Trials

Oramed’s Oral Insulin Moving Through Clinical Trials

Oramed’s Oral Insulin Moving Through Clinical Trials

Oramed Pharmaceuticals Reports Positive Results from a Study of Oral

Insulin Capsule on Type 1 Diabetic Patients

JERUSALEM, Israel – July 21, 2009– Oramed Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

(OTCBB: ORMP.OB) (http://www.oramed.com), a developer of alternative

drug delivery systems, today reported positive results from a Phase 2A study

of its oral insulin capsule, ORMD-0801, on type 1 diabetic patients. The

completion of this study marks Oramed’s first clinical trial on patients with

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, whereas, all Oramed’s trials up to date have been

conducted on type 2 diabetic patients. This study evaluated safety, tolerability,

and food effects in type 1 diabetic patients.

Oramed’s oral insulin capsule, (ORMD-0801), was well tolerated by patients

and no serious adverse events were observed. The insulin absorption was not

affected when given before meal ingestion.

Oramed Chief Scientific Officer, Miriam Kidron, PhD., remarked, “These

results demonstrate that Oramed’s oral insulin capsule had a good safety

profile and was effective on patients with type 1 diabetes when taken prior to a

meal.”

Currently, Oramed is conducting its Phase 2B clinical trial in South Africa, in

which the company is evaluating the effects of ORMD-0801 on type 2 diabetic

patients.

About Oramed Pharmaceuticals

Oramed Pharmaceuticals is a technology pioneer in the field of oral delivery solutions for

drugs and vaccines presently delivered via injection. Oramed is seeking to revolutionize the

treatment of diabetes through its patented flagship product, an orally ingestible insulin capsule

currently in phase 2 clinical trials. Established in 2006, Oramed’s technology is based on over

25 years of research by top research scientists at Jerusalem’s Hadassah Medical Center. The

Company’s corporate and R&D headquarters are based in Jerusalem.

For more information, please visit www.oramed.com

Forward-looking statements

Some of the statements contained in this press release are forward-looking statements which

involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual

results, performance or achievements of the company, or industry results, to be materially

different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such

forward looking statements, including the risks and uncertainties related to the progress,

timing, cost, and results of clinical trials and product development programs; difficulties or

delays in obtaining regulatory approval for our product candidates; competition from other

pharmaceutical or biotechnology companies; and the company’s ability to obtain additional

funding required to conduct its research, development and commercialization activities.

Please refer to the company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission for a

comprehensive list of risk factors that could cause actual results, performance or

achievements of the company to differ materially from those expressed or implied in such

forward looking statements. The company undertakes no obligation to update or revise any

forward-looking statements.

In May 2010, the Company reported results for the recently completed Phase 2b non-FDA clinical trial of its flagship oral insulin capsule, ORMD-0801.

The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-centered study in South Africa evaluated responses of Type 2 diabetes patients to ORMD-0801. Insulin-loaded or placebo capsules were administered to patients, who were closely monitored throughout the 6-week study period. Safety, tolerability and efficacy parameters of Oramed’s oral insulin were assessed. The reported results substantiate the safety and tolerability of ORMD-0801 and demonstrate that oral insulin has a relevant clinical impact at the tested dose.

In August 2008, Oramed successfully completed Phase 2A clinical trials of its oral insulin capsule. This trial was the first to expose patients with type 2 diabetes to ORMD 0801 and its primary goals were to assess the safety, tolerability and pharmcodynamic effects in these patients. ORMD 0801 was well tolerated by all patients and had a good safety profile; no serious adverse events were encountered throughout the study. In two thirds of the subjects analyzed, statistically significant reductions in glucose as well as C-peptide were observed.

Oramed also conducted another Phase 2a study with Type 1 diabetic patients and positive results were reported in July of 2009. The oral insulin capsule was safe, tolerable, and was not vulnerable to food effects.

Phase 1B trials were completed in March 2008 and were intended to find the optimal dosage of ORMD 0801. These trials were conducted with healthy volunteers.

In August 2007, Phase 1A clinical trials were completed, the goal of which was to assess both the safety/tolerability and absorption properties of Oramed’s proprietary delivery technology. The trials examined changes in insulin, glucose and C-peptide plasma concentrations over time in healthy volunteers under several differing oral dosing scenarios.

Oramed, a Jerusalem, Israel firm has developed a tablet form of insulin in which the hormone’s protein structure is supposedly protected by special adjuvants from destruction by gastric juice. The firm just reported positive results from a Phase 2A clinical trial with Type I diabetics.

From the announcement:

The completion of this study marks Oramed’s first clinical trial on patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, whereas, all Oramed’s trials up to date have been conducted on type 2 diabetic patients. This study evaluated safety, tolerability, and food effects in type 1 diabetic patients.

Oramed’s oral insulin capsule, (ORMD-0801), was well tolerated by patients and no serious adverse events were observed. The insulin absorption was not affected when given before meal ingestion.

Currently, Oramed is conducting its Phase 2B clinical trial in South Africa, in which the company is evaluating the effects of ORMD-0801 on type 2 diabetic patients.

Source : http://www.oramed.com/index.php?page=14

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Watching The Eye for Signs of Diabetes Changes

Watching The Eye for Signs of Diabetes Changes

Watching The Eye for Signs of Diabetes Changes

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — A new vision screening device, already shown to give an early warning of eye disease, could give doctors and patients a head start on treating diabetes and its vision complications, a new study shows.

The instrument, invented by two scientists at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center, captures images of the eye to detect metabolic stress and tissue damage that occur before the first symptoms of disease are evident.

For people with diabetes — diagnosed or not — the new device could offer potentially significant advantages over blood glucose testing, the “gold standard” for diabetes detection.

The device takes a specialized photograph of the eye and is non-invasive, taking about five minutes to test both eyes.

In the July issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, Victor M. Elner, M.D., Ph.D., and Howard R. Petty, Ph.D., report on the potential of the new instrument to screen for diabetes and determine its severity. If further testing confirms the results to date, the new instrument may be useful for screening people who are at risk of diabetes but haven’t been diagnosed.

“Our objective in performing this study was to determine whether we could detect abnormal metabolism in the retina of patients who might otherwise remain undiagnosed based on clinical examination alone,” says Elner, professor, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at U-M Medical School.

Metabolic stress, and therefore disease, can be detected by measuring the intensity of cellular fluorescence in retinal tissue. In a previous study, Petty and Elner reported that high levels of flavoprotein autofluorescence (FA) act as a reliable indicator of eye disease.

In their new study, Elner and Petty measured the FA levels of 21 individuals who had diabetes and compared the results to age-matched healthy controls. The Kellogg scientists found that FA activity was significantly higher for those with diabetes, regardless of severity, compared to those who did not have the disease. The results were not affected by disease severity or duration and were elevated for diabetics in each age group: 30 to 39 years, 40 to 49 years, and 50 to 59 years.

Given the increasing prevalence of diabetes, the FA device holds the potential to help address a leading and growing public health concern.

Some 24 million Americans have diabetes and an additional 57 million individuals have abnormal blood sugar levels that qualify as pre-diabetes, according to the latest report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, 4.1 million people over the age of 40 suffer from diabetic retinopathy, an eye-related complication of diabetes that is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults.

Twelve individuals in the study were known to have diabetic retinopathy, a disease in which blood vessels in the eye are damaged. The individuals with diabetic retinopathy in at least one eye had significantly greater FA activity than people with diabetes who do not have any visible eye disease.

“The abnormal readings indicated that it may be possible to use this method to monitor the severity of the disease,” says Elner.

Petty, a biophysicist and imaging expert, explains that hyperglycemia — or high blood sugar — is known to induce cell death in diabetic tissue soon after the onset of disease but before symptoms can be detected clinically.

“Increased FA activity is the earliest indicator that cell death has occurred and tissue is beginning to break down,” says Petty, professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, and professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the U-M Medical School. “FA serves as a ‘spectral-biomarker’ for metabolism gone awry, and we can use the results to detect and monitor disease.”

Petty also observes that unlike glucose monitoring, elevation of FA levels reflects ongoing tissue damage. That knowledge, he says, could motivate patients to intensify their efforts to manage the disease.

The Michigan researchers also note that elevated FA does not always mean that an individual has diabetes. “Because of the prevalence of diabetes in our population, individuals with abnormally high FA would be prompted to undergo glucose tolerance testing,” says Elner. “If the findings were negative for diabetes, we would look for other causes of ocular tissue dysfunction.”

Both Elner and Petty agree that the device has great potential as a tool for diabetes screening and management. “So much damage occurs before the disease can be detected by a doctor,” says Elner. “Early diagnosis will allow us to reduce organ damage and prevent many complications that accompany this disease.”

Elner and Petty have filed for patents and have formed a company, OcuSciences, Inc., to commercialize the metabolic imaging instrument.

Objective To test whether subjects with diabetes mellitus (DM) have enhanced retinal flavoprotein autofluorescence compared with age-matched control subjects using a rapid, noninvasive clinical imaging method.

Methods Twenty-one subjects with DM and 21 healthy age-matched control volunteers were subjected to retinal imaging using 1-ms flashes of 467-nm light. Flavoprotein autofluorescence for each flash at 535 nm was recorded using an electron-multiplying charged-coupled device camera with a 512×512-pixel chip. The average intensity and the average curve width of retinal flavoprotein autofluorescence were determined by analyzing histograms of pixel intensities plotted for each eye.

Results When stratified by age, the mean average intensity and average curve width levels in subjects with DM were significantly greater than those in controls across all 3 consecutive decades of life studied (P ? .004 and P ? .006, respectively). An overall comparison of the mean average intensity and average curve width levels in all subjects with DM vs all controls, with adjustment for age, was consistent with the results found in each age category (P =.001 and P < .001, respectively). Subjects having DM with retinopathy in at least 1 eye had significantly greater average intensity and average curve width than subjects having DM without retinopathy in either eye (P =.002 and P =.005, respectively).

Conclusions Flavoprotein autofluorescence measurements may be clinically useful to rapidly and noninvasively identify diabetic metabolic tissue stress and disease severity. Development of flavoprotein autofluorescence technology is likely to result in a tool that will improve DM screening and disease management.

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Figures in this Article

Hyperglycemia induces mitochondrial stress and apoptotic cell death in diabetic tissues soon after disease onset and before involvement can be detected by any current clinical diagnostic method.1 – 6 This suggests that measurement of mitochondrial metabolic activity can serve as an early indicator of the onset of disease.7 Before apoptosis, mitochondria exhibit impaired electron transport by energy-generating enzymes in the respiratory chain,1 ,8 causing increased percentages of flavoproteins in the chain to be oxidized and rendered capable of absorbing blue light and emitting green autofluorescence.9 – 11 This phenomenon leads to the hypothesis that increased flavoprotein autofluorescence (FA) may be an early indicator of diabetic metabolic tissue stress.

The standard criterion diagnostic method for diabetes mellitus (DM) is the oral glucose tolerance test. However, this method is cumbersome and is often avoided by patients.12 Thus, many subjects with DM may remain undiagnosed until they develop diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications.12 – 13

A noninvasive method of measuring FA to detect early ocular dysfunction due to disease has been previously described.14 In this study, we compared retinal FA levels in subjects with DM regardless of disease severity or duration with those of age-matched healthy control subjects.

METHODS

ABSTRACT | METHODS | RESULTS | COMMENT | AUTHOR INFORMATION | REFERENCES

To measure retinal FA, a modified fundus camera containing 467-nm excitation and 535-nm emission filters (Omega Optical, Brattleboro, Vermont), 2 back-illuminated electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) cameras (Photometrics 512B; Roper Scientific, Tucson, Arizona), and customized computer hardware and software were used. The equipment has been previously described.14

Twenty-one subjects, aged 30 to 59 years, with established type 1 or type 2 DM and without ophthalmic disease other than retinopathy (hereafter referred to as “cases”) were enrolled consecutively betweenJune 11, 2007, and September 17, 2007, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, during routine funduscopic examinations (Figure 1). Plasma glucose levels (obtained at the examination) were assessed by the glucose oxidase method, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Twenty-one age-matched healthy controls with normal glucose tolerance,15 normal blood pressure,16 and normal lipid profile17 according to recognized guidelines and standards were recruited as the control population.

Figure 1.

Flow of participants in the study. Subjects were classified as having diabetes mellitus by plasma testing, which served as the reference standard. The index test was retinal flavoprotein autofluorescence (FA) of each subject’s eyes. Results of the index test were then compared with the reference standard.

Image not available.

View Large | Save Figure | Download Slide (.ppt)

This study was approved by the institutional review board at the University of Michigan; all subjects gave written informed consent. The study was organized and was performed according to the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy Initiative.18 – 19

After pupillary dilation, an EMCCD camera was used to visualize the macula using commercially available software (RSImage, Roper Scientific). For each eye, a second EMCCD camera with interfaced software (MetaVue; MDS Analytical Technologies, Toronto, Ontario, Canada) was used to capture 3 to 5 FA 535-nm readings, each induced by a 1-ms flash of 467-nm light. Imaging required 5 minutes per patient. The depth of instrument focus results in the capture of FA from all retinal layers.

The FA images, stored as 512×512-pixel files, were analyzed to produce histograms using available software (MetaVue; Adobe Photoshop CS2; Adobe Systems, San Jose, California; and Lispix; National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland). Histograms of pixel intensities (Figure 2), ranging from 0 to 256 U gray scale, were plotted for each eye to yield the average intensity (AI) and the average curve width (ACW) of retinal FA. All images were independently interpreted by 2 research associates (M.G.F. and J.M.F.) trained in FA image evaluation. If disagreement was encountered, a consensus reading was performed. At the time of imaging and statistical analysis, the research associates knew if the patient had DM, but test review bias was minimized by not excluding any subject’s data and by relying on objective results of FA testing. t Test and analysis of variance were used to compare the AI and the ACW in cases vs controls. Comparisons of eye-specific AI and ACW in cases vs controls were made using mixed linear regression analysis to adjust for intereye dependency and age (where appropriate). Commercially available software (SAS 9.0; SAS Institute Inc, Cary, North Carolina) was used for all statistical analyses. P < .05 was considered significant.

Figure 2.

Retinal flavoprotein autofluorescence (FA) histograms of pixel intensities collected from 3 age-matched subjects. Each panel displays 4 histograms of the right (black line) and left (blue line) eyes of each subject. Right shift of histograms designates increased retinal FA intensity. ACW indicates average curve width; AI, average intensity; L, left; and R, right. Numerals are given as mean (SE) gray scale units.

University of Michigan researchers are trialing a new in-house device that detects retinal flavoprotein autofluorescence, a potential indicator of the presence of diabetes-induced retinal metabolic changes, such as early diabetic retinopathy.

Metabolic stress, and therefore disease, can be detected by measuring the intensity of cellular fluorescence in retinal tissue. In a previous study, Petty and Elner reported that high levels of flavoprotein autofluorescence (FA) act as a reliable indicator of eye disease.

In their new study, Elner and Petty measured the FA levels of 21 individuals who had diabetes and compared the results to age-matched healthy controls. The Kellogg scientists found that FA activity was significantly higher for those with diabetes, regardless of severity, compared to those who did not have the disease. The results were not affected by disease severity or duration and were elevated for diabetics in each age group: 30 to 39 years, 40 to 49 years, and 50 to 59 years.

Twelve individuals in the study were known to have diabetic retinopathy, a disease in which blood vessels in the eye are damaged. The individuals with diabetic retinopathy in at least one eye had significantly greater FA activity than people with diabetes who do not have any visible eye disease.

“The abnormal readings indicated that it may be possible to use this method to monitor the severity of the disease,” says Elner.

Petty, a biophysicist and imaging expert, explains that hyperglycemia — or high blood sugar — is known to induce cell death in diabetic tissue soon after the onset of disease but before symptoms can be detected clinically.

“Increased FA activity is the earliest indicator that cell death has occurred and tissue is beginning to break down,” says Petty, professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, and professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the U-M Medical School. “FA serves as a ‘spectral-biomarker’ for metabolism gone awry, and we can use the results to detect and monitor disease.”

Petty also observes that unlike glucose monitoring, elevation of FA levels reflects ongoing tissue damage. That knowledge, he says, could motivate patients to intensify their efforts to manage the disease.

The Michigan researchers also note that elevated FA does not always mean that an individual has diabetes. “Because of the prevalence of diabetes in our population, individuals with abnormally high FA would be prompted to undergo glucose tolerance testing,” says Elner. “If the findings were negative for diabetes, we would look for other causes of ocular tissue dysfunction.”

Source : http://www2.med.umich.edu/prmc/media/newsroom/details.cfm?ID=459

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Magical Medical Cellphones: Measuring Fat & Radiation

Magical Medical Cellphones: Measuring Fat & Radiation

Magical Medical Cellphones: Measuring Fat & Radiation

We’ve seen phones with lots of crazy features, but in my opinion BenQ’s fat-measuring phone beats them all. The alleged phone keeps track of your pudge by shooting out a micro-current that travels through your body.

When you touch two separate electrodes on the phone, a special chip will measure the electrical signal and before you know it, you’ll be dropping those Twinkies in no time flat. I think the idea is pretty far-fetched—the last thing anyone wants is a phone telling them when they’ve had one too many Doritos. – Louis Ramirez

Cellphones are the under-appreciated work horses of the medical industry, doing everything from transmitting ECG data to your doctor, to managing your diabetes and keeping tabs on your alcoholic liver. Well, now we have more cell phone uses that you didn’t know you couldn’t live without until now:

Engadget is reporting that the Department of Homeland Security is considering equipping government employees with cellphones capable of detecting radiological, biological, and chemical weapons.

Homeland Security Department officials are looking into outfitting cell phones with tiny, sensitive detectors that would alert the government and emergency responders to the presence of radiological isotopes, toxic chemicals and deadly biological agents such as anthrax. nuke cellphone Magical Medical Cellphones: Measuring Fat & Radiation

“”If it’s successful, it’ll change the way chemical, biological and radiation detection is done,” says Rolf Deitrich, deputy director of the Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency, which invests in high-tech solutions to secure the nation against terrorist attacks. ”It’s a really, really neat thing.”

Deitrich says it’s way too early to know whether the idea would work, and department officials are just beginning talks with phone companies, privacy advocates and researchers. If it does work, he says, it could be a “”game-changer” in how the nation recognizes and responds to a deadly attack.

body feat measuring phone Magical Medical Cellphones: Measuring Fat & Radiation

Meanwhile, Gizmodo has it on good authority that the cellphone giant BenQ is planning on a cell phone that can monitor your body fat percentage. Apparently, the technology is very similar to body impedance devices on gym equipment which require you to touch two electrodes. Unfortunately, BenQ says a cellphone that also nags you about your increased weight is several years away…

Source : http://gizmodo.com/257720/benqs-fat+measuring-phone-keeps-your-spare-tire-in-check?tag=gadgetsfattiephone

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