Archive for ‘Diabetes Monitor’

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Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Market 2016 Size, Share, Growth and Forecast to 2020

Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Market 2016 Size, Share, Growth and Forecast to 2020

MRRBIZ156

 

MarketResearchReports.biz has recently announced the addition of a market study “ Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Market Research Report 2016 ”, is a comparative analysis of the global market.

Notes:

Production, means the output of Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments

Revenue, means the sales value of Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments

This report studies Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering

Chart

Worthington Industries

Cesca Therapeutics

Shengjie Cryogenic Equipment

Sichuan Mountain Vertical

Qingdao Beol

Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like

North America

Europe

China

Japan

Southeast Asia

India

Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into

Liquid Phase

Vapor Phase

Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments in each application, can be divided into

Cord Blood Stem Cells Cryopreservation

Other Stem Cells Cryopreservation

Download The sample Copy Of This Report:http://www.marketresearchreports.biz/sample/sample/903441

Table Of Content

Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Market Research Report 2016

1 Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Market Overview

1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments

1.2 Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Segment by Type

1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments by Type in 2015

1.2.2 Liquid Phase

1.2.3 Vapor Phase

1.3 Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Segment by Application

1.3.1 Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015

1.3.2 Cord Blood Stem Cells Cryopreservation

1.3.3 Other Stem Cells Cryopreservation

1.4 Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Market by Region

1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2011-2021)

1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021)

1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021)

1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021)

1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2011-2021)

1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2011-2021)

1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments (2011-2021)

2 Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Market Competition by Manufacturers

2.1 Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)

2.2 Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Revenue and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)

2.3 Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Average Price by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)

2.4 Manufacturers Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area and Product Type

2.5 Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Market Competitive Situation and Trends

2.5.1 Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Market Concentration Rate

2.5.2 Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Market Share of Top 3 and Top 5 Manufacturers

2.5.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion

3 Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Revenue (Value) by Region (2011-2016)

3.1 Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production by Region (2011-2016)

3.2 Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production Market Share by Region (2011-2016)

3.3 Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Revenue (Value) and Market Share by Region (2011-2016)

3.4 Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

3.5 North America Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

3.6 Europe Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

3.7 China Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

3.8 Japan Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

3.9 Southeast Asia Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

3.10 India Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

4 Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Supply (Production), Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

4.1 Global Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Consumption by Regions (2011-2016)

4.2 North America Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

4.3 Europe Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

4.4 China Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

4.5 Japan Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

4.6 Southeast Asia Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

4.7 India Stem Cells Cryopreservation Equipments Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)Raiing

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Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Market Research Report Size,Share,Analysis,Trends and Forecast 2016

Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Market Research Report Size,Share,Analysis,Trends and Forecast 2016

MRRBIZ159

 

MarketResearchReports.biz has recently announced the addition of a market study “ Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Market Research Report 2016 ”, is a comparative analysis of the global market.

Notes:

Production, means the output of Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug

Revenue, means the sales value of Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug

This report studies Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with Production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering

Amgen

Roche

Bristol Myers Squibb

Dendreon (Valeant)

Novartis

Seattle Genetics

Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like

North America

Europe

China

Japan

Southeast Asia

India

Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into

Tablet

Injection

Download The sample Copy Of This Report:http://www.marketresearchreports.biz/sample/sample/903214

Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug in each application, can be divided into

Leukemia Treatment

Colorectal Cancer Treatment

Other Cancer Treatment

Table Of Content

Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Market Research Report 2016

1 Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Market Overview

1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug

1.2 Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Segment by Type

1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug by Type in 2015

1.2.2 Tablet

1.2.3 Injection

1.3 Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Segment by Application

1.3.1 Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015

1.3.2 Leukemia Treatment

1.3.3 Colorectal Cancer Treatment

1.3.4 Other Cancer Treatment

1.4 Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Market by Region

1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2011-2021)

1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021)

1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021)

1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021)

1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2011-2021)

1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2011-2021)

1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug (2011-2021)

2 Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Market Competition by Manufacturers

2.1 Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)

2.2 Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Revenue and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)

2.3 Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Average Price by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)

2.4 Manufacturers Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area and Product Type

2.5 Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Market Competitive Situation and Trends

2.5.1 Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Market Concentration Rate

2.5.2 Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Market Share of Top 3 and Top 5 Manufacturers

2.5.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion

3 Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Revenue (Value) by Region (2011-2016)

3.1 Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production and Market Share by Region (2011-2016)

3.2 Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Revenue (Value) and Market Share by Region (2011-2016)

3.3 Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

3.4 North America Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

3.5 Europe Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

3.6 China Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

3.7 Japan Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

3.8 Southeast Asia Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

3.9 India Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016)

4 Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Supply (Production), Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

4.1 Global Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Consumption by Regions (2011-2016)

4.2 North America Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

4.3 Europe Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

4.4 China Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

4.5 Japan Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

4.6 Southeast Asia Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

4.7 India Non-Specific Cancer Immunotherapy Drug Production, Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)

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GE Combines Fluoroscopy and Ultrasound in New Interventional Suite

GE Combines Fluoroscopy and Ultrasound in New Interventional Suite

GE Combines Fluoroscopy and Ultrasound in New Interventional Suite

For more than three decades, GE Healthcare has been committed to delivering high-quality, innovative advances in the mobile surgical C-arm field – supporting successful surgeries throughout the world with easy-to-use technology. Today at RSNA 2012, GE Healthcare (NYSE: GE) will showcase a number of new advanced imaging solutions for the surgical space, helping clinicians see more in the OR. These new innovations from OEC take surgical imaging to the next level, with offerings including a fluoroscopy ultrasound All-In-One Unit, and OEC’s new, affordable Brivo 865 Advance C-arm.

OEC Elite + Venue 40

Medical professionals worldwide have long recognized fluoroscopy and ultrasound as valuable modalities in the OR, and yet each imaging system is still considered and bought separately. Today, GE Healthcare shares its latest addition to its family of Hybrid Operating Solutions, the OEC Elite + Venue 40*, an integrated fluoroscopy and ultrasound all-in-one unit.

For the first time, surgeons and physicians can access fluoroscopy and ultrasound in a single workstation, to help maximize efficiencies in OR workflow, floor space, and costs. This new system combines the power, precision and performance of the OEC 9900 Elite C-arm with the simple-to-use GE Venue 40 tablet ultrasound to help see more during surgical procedures.

“We’re excited to bring together these two technologies, giving our customers the confidence they need to perform more complex procedures,” said Joe Shrawder, President and CEO, GE Healthcare Surgery. “We take pride in the advanced imaging capabilities of all of our systems across the GE portfolio. Combining two of our leading systems for the surgical suite is a solution our customers will appreciate.”

With this new system, the GE Venue 40 tablet is mounted within the OEC 9900 Elite C-arm’s workstation, allowing surgeons to easily access the ultrasound tablet when needed. Guiding the insertion and placement of needles, guidewires and catheters, surgeons can see more on the screens within comfortable view by leveraging these two modalities.

Instead of moving patients or imaging equipment in and out of the OR during procedures, surgical staff can view collocated displays for fluoroscopy and ultrasound without leaving the OR. The OEC Elite + Venue 40 brings both modalities together, allowing medical professionals to efficiently manage complex treatments while helping to preserve sterile environments.

“With its compact size and combined functions, this new system gives the surgical team more room to maneuver quickly around the OR, especially when responding to sudden changes in a patient’s condition during a procedure,” Shrawder said. “And when patient care requires ultrasound alone, the Venue 40 unit easily detaches from the C-arm to go to the clinical environment where the patient needs care.”

*The OEC Elite + Venue 40 is not available for sale in all areas globally.

OEC Brivo 865 Advance

GE’s leadership in innovation continues with the OEC Brivo 865 Advance**, the company’s latest addition to its portfolio of surgical C-arms. With legacy OEC image quality and ease-of-use the affordability and reliability of this new Brivo C-arm will offer a high quality, affordable option for basic surgical imaging.

The first C-arm from OEC’s Brivo line designed for the needs of US customers, the Brivo Advance utilizes enhancements and extras—such as Advanced Clear Intelligence imaging, an intuitive user interface, and wireless connectivity—to give surgical teams the image quality and easy-to-use technology they’ve come to expect from OEC, with the affordability of the Brivo product line.

“We’re thrilled to bring our line of Brivo C-arms to the US with the new OEC Brivo 865 Advance,” said Shrawder. “The C-arm offers an affordable solution without sacrificing the technology and innovation OEC is known for. It provides easy positioning and maneuverability enabling optimal image acquisition with fewer re-takes, and new advancements in steering and lightweight construction make the system highly portable.”

** 510(k) Pending at U.S. FDA. Not available for sale in the United States.

* Trademark of General Electric Company.

GE Healthcare at RSNA 2012

At RSNA 2012, GE Healthcare is introducing a number of new devices including the OEC Elite+Venue 40. The system combines a fluoroscope and ultrasound into one unit for greater convenience, a smaller footprint, and financial savings compared to using separate devices. Here’s Joe Shrawder, President and CEO Surgery at GE Healthcare, showing off the new system:

Source : http://www.genewscenter.com/Press-Releases/GE-Healthcare-Unveils-New-Suite-of-Surgical-Imaging-Products-3c80.aspx

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Philips DirectLife Activity Monitor at TEDMED

Philips DirectLife Activity Monitor at TEDMED

Philips DirectLife Activity Monitor at TEDMED

People across the US are breaking down personal barriers, getting active and fit with DirectLife. Read their stories of success.

An example: “The Direct Life Program has really made me very aware of keeping healthy and fit. In the past I would only get exercise once or twice a week but now I make sure that I do something active every day!”

With DirectLife, you can make small changes to bad habits – changes that help you find a more active lifestyle – and stay more active for the long term.

The slow, step-by-step program starts by tracking how much you move every day. We’ll help you set goals and track your progress. We’ll make suggestions about how to increase your activity levels at your own pace, and provide you a personal coach who can help you stay motivated. It’s a program you can stick to for the long term, because it’s custom built for you.

Last week at TEDMED, Philips was giving away their DirectLife devices that monitor person’s daily activity using a built-in accelerometer. In a crowded room at the conference, we spoke to one of the representatives of Philips to find out what the product is all about:

Source : http://www.directlife.philips.com/

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Steven Palter Helps Bring Web Tech to Peer-Reviewed Articles

Steven Palter Helps Bring Web Tech to Peer-Reviewed Articles

Steven Palter Helps Bring Web Tech to Peer-Reviewed Articles

Washington DC (June 19, 2012) – Fertility and Sterility, the flagship journal of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and its publisher Elsevier, announce the first-ever publication of a new multimedia article format that integrates video and traditional print research.

Online video and traditional print were previously two separate and unrelated worlds in scientific research. The new mechanism allows videos to be cited the same way as a written article in a traditional print medical journal and seamlessly unifies online multimedia content and print journals. Researchers can watch footage of innovations and techniques and learn previously inaccessible information in new non-written formats while still being able to find this information through traditional medical print sources.

“For the last 200 years, medical publishing remained unchanged. Our solution accommodates non-print work through fully integrated multimedia, opens up a whole new form of learning, and allows readers to become part of an ongoing interactive discussion,” says Dr. Steven Palter, the Video and New Media Editor of Fertility and Sterility. Dr. Palter, who developed the concept and spearheaded the project, says “With this effort, we have bridged the gap separating the digital and traditional medical literature. This integration will lead to exciting new directions in research.”

The new media initiative is unique in several ways. It allows an article to exist simultaneously online and in the traditional medical journal and it enables videos to be citable publications for all traditional journals. Fertility and Sterility embeds an open access link in the article that appears both in PubMed and the Journal’s electronic tables of contents, and also in the print journal. QR codes associated with each article seamlessly bring readers from print journal to online video. Authors can create review articles, experimental techniques, anatomic overviews, case reports, and more. Videos, which are peer reviewed as part of the mainstream submission process are served open source through Google’s YouTube.

Craig Niederberger MD, Co-Editor-in-Chief of Fertility and Sterility said, “We are committed to using modern communication methods, from online video to social media to enhance Fertility and Sterility. Medical journals are about conveying new information and new discoveries to others in the field. We simply cannot rely on print alone to do that anymore.”

Antonio Pellicer, MD, Co- Editor-in-Chief of the journal, said, “Medicine has always been an international pursuit. Now with online distribution of multimedia articles the sharing of knowledge can occur even faster, indeed simultaneously around the globe, thus improving patient care more quickly and without regard to geography.”

The first article “Single port laparoscopy” is authored by L. Carvalho et al from the Cleveland Clinic, and appears in the May 2012 issue of Fertility and Sterility and shows a new surgical principle. The abstract both on-line and in the print publication leads to an online video showing the technique: http://fertstertforum.com/2012974caravalho. The article is currently indexed in PubMed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22542145.

The second article, “Chromosome transfer in mature oocytes,” is authored by M. Tachibana et al. From the Oregon National Primate Research Center and also appears in the May 2012 issue of Fertility and Sterility. The video which demonstrates the innovative laboratory technique is at http://fertstertforum.com/2012974tachibana. The article is currently indexed in PubMed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22542144.

With this innovation, ASRM and Elsevier have embraced the digital revolution that has rapidly transformed traditional publishing. Just as the Amazon Kindle brought epublishing to the masses, the new video article initiative of Fertility and Sterility bridges the gap between online multimedia and traditional medical research publishing.

The American Society for Reproductive Medicine, founded in 1944, is an organization of 8,000 physicians, researchers, nurses, technicians and other professionals dedicated to advancing knowledge and expertise in reproductive biology. Affiliated societies include the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, the Society for Male Reproduction and Urology, the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, the Society of Reproductive Surgeons, and the Society of Reproductive Biologists and Technologists.

Resulting from the Article of the Future project innovations, we are now able to announce the SciVerse ScienceDirect redesigned article page, with a new layout including a navigational pane and an optimized reading middle pane.

The Article of the Future project- an ongoing initiative aiming to revolutionize the traditional format of the academic paper in regard to three key elements: presentation, content and context.

Learn what we are doing and why by viewing the video below.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To demonstrate the abdominal wall anatomy necessary to perform a single port laparoscopic procedure. Single port laparoscopic (SPL) surgery has reduced the number of sites required to perform laparoscopic surgery. However, the incision at the umbilicus is larger than conventional laparoscopic surgery.

DESIGN:

Video presentation of clinical article. The video uses animation and surgical cases to demonstrate the relevant abdominal wall anatomy to establish surgical access for a single site or single port laparoscopy.

RESULT(S):

This video demonstrates the regional anatomy pertinent to the anterior abdominal wall, specifically of the umbilicus. The umbilicus is a focal point of fusion of the anterior abdominal wall muscles that allows entry into the peritoneal cavity. For this procedure there are 2 incisions possible, a small midline intra-umbilical one and an omega incision. The video demonstrates each technique. Introduction of a port into this single incision is demonstrated with 2 different trocar systems. These trocar systems show how the limitations of using a single site may be reduced.

CONCLUSION(S):

The abdominal wall anatomy is unique at the umbilicus and allows optimal placement of a single trocar to allow laparoscopic surgery. Video is available at http://fertstertforum.com/2012974caravalho/.

Congratulations to our old friend Steven Palter, MD who’s been working with Elsevier and the American Society of Reproductive Medicine to birth a “video article format” with all the rigor of peer-reviewed publications, indexing through PubMed, but with the open commentary of the web and accessibility of YouTube.

From Dr. Palter’s blog, Doc in the Machine:

The project began with my frustration at seeing medical research shoehorned into an an antiquated print system that precluded any leverage of the power of modern digital research and communication.

Online video and traditional print were previously two separate and unrelated worlds in scientific research. I was astounded when i saw online journals that described how traditional print research couldn’t allow multimedia content. It was obvious that we needed to find a mechanism to radically change medical research from within the system rather than try to build something new and reject a system used by all of scientific research.

The new mechanism allows videos to be cited the same way as a written article in a traditional print medical journal and seamlessly unifies online multimedia content and print journals. Researchers can watch footage of innovations and techniques and learn previously inaccessible information in new non-written formats while still being able to find this information through traditional medical print sources.

Source : http://www.asrm.org/ASRM_and_Elsevier_Create_New_Digital_Article_Format/

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C8 Non-Invasive Optical Glucose Monitor System Cleared for Sale in Europe

C8 Non-Invasive Optical Glucose Monitor System Cleared for Sale in Europe

C8 Non-Invasive Optical Glucose Monitor System Cleared for Sale in Europe

A new non-invasive continuous glucose monitor is approved for marketing in Europe

C8 MediSensors, Inc. (http://www.c8medisensors.com) has today announced it received CE Mark approval for its Optical Glucose Monitor System, allowing the device, a new non-invasive continuous glucose monitor (nCGM), to be marketed in Europe.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20121024/567690 )

The comprehensive, 10-year Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) clearly demonstrated that individuals with type 1 diabetes who kept blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible for as long as possible had less chance of developing disease-related complications. The DCCT found that the risk of eye disease was reduced by 76%, kidney disease by 50% and nerve disease by 60%.[1]Since that time, other studies have confirmed the importance of tight glycaemic control with minimal glucose excursions in reducing disease-related complications not only in type 1 diabetes, but also in type 2.[2-6] In addition, a large number of studies have shown that continuous glucose monitors (CGM) can improve glycaemic control with reduced risk of hypoglycaemia.[7-19]

CGMs are adjunct devices that are intended to complement finger stick blood glucose tests. Traditional CGMs rely on a needle sensor inserted under the skin, which can cause pain or discomfort, and pose a risk of infection.[20] In contrast, the C8 MediSensors Optical Glucose Monitor System harnesses the power of light to measure glucose levels. Using Raman spectroscopy, a beam of light is shone into the skin and the resulting vibrations of glucose molecules are measured to give a glucose reading; all achieved via a small, pain-free portable monitor, discreetly worn under clothes against the skin.

For added convenience these readings are stored and sent wirelessly to the user’s smartphone for glucose readings at a glance, providing the wearer with a continuous picture of glucose dynamics throughout the day. A good understanding of glucose levels is invaluable in managing diabetes and improving patient outcomes.[1]In clinical studies, the C8 MediSensors monitor was found to have accuracy comparable to earlier versions of invasive CGMs when those systems were first introduced, but with less pain and less risk of infection.

“C8 MediSensors was co-founded by a father trying to help his son living with diabetes, and as a company, we remain dedicated to helping those with the disease,” said Paul Zygielbaum, CEO of C8 MediSensors. “CE Mark approval is a landmark step for this unique technology. Our team is hugely excited to be working to make nCGM and the Optical Glucose Monitor System available throughout Europe.”

The C8 MediSensors Optical Glucose Monitor System will initially be available for purchase online via the C8 MediSensors website, http://www.c8medisensors.com.

The C8 MediSensors Optical Glucose Monitor System is an adjunct device. It is contraindicated in pregnancy and for those under 18 years of age, as well as in individuals with very light or very dark skin tones, peripheral vascular disease or individuals who smoke.

-ends-

Notes to editors:

About C8 MediSensors

C8 MediSensors is the leader in non-invasive continuous glucose monitoring. Headquartered in San Jose CA, C8 MediSensors’ breakthrough patent-protected technology gives people with diabetes a continuous view of their glucose levels, without the pain, inconvenience and high cost of invasive continuous glucose monitoring. Visit http://www.c8medisensors.com.

Additional background information on ‘Diabetes and continuous glucose monitoring’ and ‘C8 MediSensors and the Optical Glucose Monitor’ are available from the European media contacts below.

This document contains forward-looking statements. Any statements contained in this document that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, statements relating to the company’s anticipated product sales and financing needs. These forward-looking statements are based upon the company’s current expectations. Actual results could differ materially from these forward-looking statements as a result of certain factors, including, without limitation, risks associated with market conditions, customer demand for the product, and risks and uncertainties associated with the company’s business and finances in general. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this document. The company does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements as a result of new information, future events, changed assumptions or otherwise.

People with diabetes long for a glucose monitor that is accurate, continuous, non-invasive, and non-intrusive. Our goals focus on improving health, quality of life, and reducing risks of long-term diabetes-related complications by minimizing glucose variability.

Our optical technology provides continuous glucose monitoring that we believe can help people with diabetes achieve better glycemic control without the complexity, inconvenience, and pain of current invasive methods.

C8 MediSensors, a San Jose, California company, maybe making a bit of history by receiving the European CE Mark for their Optical Glucose Monitor System. The firm’s sensor uses Raman spectroscopy to non-invasively detect glucose in blood by shining light through the skin and detecting changes in the returning spectrum.

Once the sensor is attached to the skin it sends out regular readings wirelessly over Bluetooth to a smartphone, allowing for tight glycemic control and near instant alerts when glucose levels go outside preset parameters. It’s currently compatible with Android phones and an iOS app is expected to be available next year.

From the product page:

The C8 MediSensors monitor does not require constant recalibration to maintain sensor accuracy. Except for periodic baseline reference measurements, there is no need for ongoing finger sticks to constantly recalibrate the C8 MediSensors monitor. After being removed and put back on, the monitor will resume measuring glucose – no recalibration or sensor replacement required.

Our technique involves shining a monochromatic light source into the skin and detecting the scattered light. The colors generated by Raman scattering are very specific to the exact chemical structure of the molecules in the sample. The molecules’ various shapes, sizes, atoms, and types of chemical bonds will generate unique Raman spectra, a unique Raman “fingerprint” that can be used to non-invasively read and measure glucose.

Source : http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/c8-medisensors-gains-ce-mark-approval-for-the-c8-medisensors-optical-glucose-monitortm-system-for-people-with-diabetes-175821951.html

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Bacteria-Based Strips for Blood Glucose Monitoring

Bacteria-Based Strips for Blood Glucose Monitoring

Bacteria-Based Strips for Blood Glucose Monitoring

People with diabetes may one day have a less expensive resource for monitoring their blood glucose levels, if research by a group of Missouri University of Science and Technology students becomes reality.

Members of the Missouri S&T chapter of iGEM – the International Genetically Engineered Machine Foundation – recently devised a biological system that uses segments of DNA embedded in bacteria to detect glucose. The students believe their development could lead to a new type of test strip for diabetics.

IGEM-2011-web450.jpg

Biological sciences students Erica Shannon, left, and Amanda Foster are among the members of Missouri S&T’s iGEM chapter. The group developed a biological system to detect glucose levels, a process that could one day help people with diabetes.

“We designed DNA so that bacteria that have DNA would sense a change in osmolarity due to the presence of glucose,” says Erica Shannon of Wildwood, Mo., a senior in biological sciences at Missouri S&T and president of the campus’s iGEM chapter. Osmolarity refers to the concentration of a compound – in this case, glucose – in a solution.

For their project, the students designed genes that allow the bacteria – a non-virulent strain of E. coli – to sense the presence of the simple sugar glucose. The bacteria emit a yellow glow when glucose is present. As glucose concentrations become higher, the glow becomes brighter.

The team developed the system as part of an annual competition sponsored by iGEM, the Americas Regional Jamboree, held Oct. 8-10, 2011, in Indianapolis. S&T’s iGEM chapter received a silver medal for their effort.

According to Shannon, her team’s biological system could form the basis for new, less costly processes to help people with diabetes monitor their blood-sugar levels. It would require replacing the fluorescent gene with one that would cause the bacteria to change color based on glucose levels. This in turn could lead to the development of diabetes blood-test strips that could indicate glucose levels based on various colors. For example, a test strip might turn green if glucose levels are within normal ranges, yellow if borderline and red if elevated.

“All you would have to do is put the DNA inside a bacteria and you’ve got your test strip,” says Shannon.

Bacteria-based test strips would also be less expensive to make than current chemical-based test strips, Shannon says.

“In the future, based on further research, an insulin gene could be added to this system for use in insulin pumps, where specific glucose levels trigger insulin production,” she says.

In addition to Shannon, other members of the iGEM team include:

Amanda Foster of Jefferson City, Mo, a senior in biological sciences and biochemical engineering and chapter vice president.

Blythe Ferriere of Sturgeon, Mo, a junior in chemical engineering and chapter treasurer.

Brice Curtin of St. Louis, Mo, a senior in chemistry and chapter secretary.

Lou Harmon of St. Louis, Mo, a senior in computer science and chapter webmaster.

David Pohlman of Arnold, Mo, a junior in biochemical engineering and chapter lab manager.

Alie Abele of Long Lane, Mo, a sophomore in environmental engineering.

Erica McFarland of Rolla, Mo, a senior in biological sciences.

Hannah Frye of Lee’s Summit, Mo., a biochemistry major.

Beth Wilkins of Rolla, Mo, a junior in biological sciences and chemistry.

Emily Puleo of St. Louis, Mo, a freshman in biochemistry.

Logan Sauerbrei of Lebanon, Mo, a junior in biological sciences.

Chester Gregg of Maryville, Mo, a junior in computer science and physics.

Amber Kreps of St. James, Mo, a senior in biological sciences.

Christy Kwon of Rolla, Mo, a student at Truman State University in Kirksville, Mo.

Gavin Pringle of Cape Girardeau, Mo, a sophomore in computer science.

Tyler Robinson of St. Louis, Mo, a senior in biological sciences.

Thomas Congdon of St. Robert, Mo, a freshman in biological sciences.

The team advisors are Dr. David Westenberg and Dr. Katie Shannon, both associate professors of biological sciences at Missouri S&T.

Normally you wouldn’t want your test strips to get into contact with bacteria; you’d want to store the strips in a safe and clean place. But what if the bacteria were part of the test strip? Students from Missouri Science and Technology have made a system in which they use segments of DNA embedded in bacteria to detect glucose.

The students have used a non-virulent strain of E.coli and put designed genes into the bacteria’s DNA, enabling them to sense the presence of glucose. The bacteria emit a yellow glow if there is glucose and as the glucose concentration rises, the glow becomes brighter. The DNA senses a change in osmolarity due to the presence of glucose.

It could become the basis for a new way to monitor blood glucose levels. The plan is to replace the fluorescent gene with another gene, which would make the bacteria change color based on glucose concentrations. Bacteria based test strips might also be less expensive than chemical based strips, which are currently used. A future step in the development of this system, is to add an insulin gene for use in insulin pumps, where certain glucose levels trigger insulin production.

Source : http://news.mst.edu/2012/01/student_teams_glucose_sensor_u.html

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Smart Diabetes Monitor VerioIQ Tracks Glucose Patterns

Smart Diabetes Monitor VerioIQ Tracks Glucose Patterns

Smart Diabetes Monitor VerioIQ Tracks Glucose Patterns

The health information on this Web site is for general background purposes and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific conditions. Seek prompt medical attention for healthcare questions you have. Consult your physician before making changes to your medication, diet, fitness program or blood glucose testing schedules.

© LifeScan Canada Ltd. 1998-2012. Trademarks are owned by Johnson & Johnson and used under licence. The third party trademarks used herein are trademarks of their respective owners.

Sometimes it seems that there are almost as many diabetes monitors, or glucometers, as there are people with diabetes (well, not really, but you get the point). Furthermore, each one seems to tout a different set of features that differentiate it from the rest. So when we at Medgadget were approached by the people at Life Scan about their new OneTouch Verio IQ Meter, we were curious to learn more. Described as “the first meter ever that looks for patterns of highs and lows—and alerts you, right on screen, when it finds one,” the VerioIQ is a hand-held monitor with a simple array of four buttons, a color display screen, memory to hold 750 recordings, and bilingual (English/Spanish) capability.

Like most current glucometers, it provides the user a lance to draw blood via finger-prick. This editor was provided with a complimentary review device and found it to be user-friendly, though had to lend it out to a diabetic colleague who was impressed enough with the added features. The key development is the VerioIQ’s PatternAlert system that detects time ranges during a five-day period during which the patient’s glucose is running abnormally high or low, thus virtually eliminating the need for a logbook. For those with extremely well-managed diabetes this is likely not as much of an issue, though it’s clear how patients with more variable glucose levels may benefit.

Medgadget had the opportunity to interview Life Scan’s Associate Director of Marketing, Kamal Bhandal, about the new device:

Medgadget: Can you please discuss your newest product, OneTouch VerioIQ, and why diabetic patients may uniquely benefit from it?

Bhandal: The key to successfully managing diabetes is keeping blood sugar levels in a healthy range. You want to minimize the highs and lows. Blood glucose testing provides the information a patient and doctor need to see how food choices and activity affect blood sugar, and to adjust treatment if necessary. But making sense of your results and knowing what to do with them can be a challenge.

The OneTouch VerioIQ is the first and only meter that looks for patterns of high and low blood sugar and alerts people right on the screen. With every test, the OneTouch VerioIQ Meter compares the current result with previous ones and alerts the patient to patterns he or she might not even be aware of. This is important for people on insulin who are at the greatest risk of experiencing low blood sugar which can be dangerous. So spotting and correcting a developing pattern of low blood sugars as early as possible is key. A companion OneTouch VerioIQ Pattern Guide is also available and offers possible causes and potential solutions for high and low patterns.

Medgadget: Does OneTouch have any plans on moving into the smart phone market?

Bhandal: We recognize that many consumers rely on their smart phones for a variety of daily tasks and could benefit from diabetes management solutions offered on a mobile platform. While we don’t have any new product announcements at this time, we are continuously looking to develop innovative solutions that integrate as seamlessly as possible into people’s lives to help improve their diabetes management and daily self-care decisions .

Medgadget: What are you most excited about with regard to the future of diabetes management and care?

Bhandal: This is truly the information age when it comes to diabetes management. Patients need to understand what their results mean and how to act on them. One of the greatest opportunities is to give them the tools to help them and their healthcare professional make the best daily self-care decisions possible. The key is to make them simple, easy and relevant. For example, we know that most people with diabetes treat their out of range high or low blood glucose results in the moment and move on. But if they’re not proactively looking for root causes, they can get on a roller coaster of just reacting to highs and lows – over and over again – without even realizing that they may be connected. That’s why we developed the OneTouch VerioIQ System. It’s the first and only meter to look for patterns of high and low blood sugar and alert patients right on the screen so they can more easily recognize the issue and take action to correct potential problems. This is the kind of innovation that we believe can have a significant impact on how people understand and manage their diabetes.

Source : http://www.onetouch.ca/verioiq

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JewelPUMP Insulin Delivery Platform with Smartphone Remote Control

JewelPUMP Insulin Delivery Platform with Smartphone Remote Control

JewelPUMP Insulin Delivery Platform with Smartphone Remote Control

Debiotech of Lausanne, Switzerland is bringing to the worldwide market its JewelPUMP insulin delivery device. The JewelPUMP carries 500 Units of insulin, providing a week’s worth use without having to change the pump (you’ll still have to replace the cannula patch every three days).

JewelCOM JewelPUMP Insulin Delivery Platform with Smartphone Remote ControlTo program the electronic patch, Debiotech developed their own Android powered phone, the JewelCOM, that features an integrated blood glucose meter. It uses dedicated SIM card security to communicate with the JewelPUMP, making it according to the company “the

most secure remotely controlled medical device ever conceived.” If you do misplace your phone, though, there are a couple buttons on the pump itself that you can use to deliver a bolus. Once you find the phone and it’s back within range of the pump, it will reprogram the delivery dosage as needed.

More from Severin Leven, PhD, lead of the JewelPUMP electronics team:

The communication between the JewelPUMP and the JewelCOM is using the new Bluetooth low energy mode and, thanks to the MEMS pump-chip, the JewelPUMP can operate for 7 days on a single green battery (mercury and lithium free). We have even incorporated a temperature sensor into the JewelPUMP to inform the patient in case the insulin would be over-exposed to heat. Last but not least, we have added a sensor to automatically detect any disconnection of the JewelPUMP from the cannula patch to automatically suspend the insulin delivery until it is reattached.

First Diabetes Clinical Study with the JewelPump™

(June 4, 2012)

Debiotech presents its new DIALEASETM system at EDTA-ERA in Paris

(May 21, 2012)

BRACCO Imaging acquires Debiotech’s subsidiary “Swiss Medical Care”.

(August 1, 2011)

JewelPUMP: “Best in show at ADA” says Diabetes Mine

(June 28th, 2010)

STMicroelectronics and Debiotech Debut Jewel Pump at ADA Congress,US

(June 23th, 2010)

Kimal Medical Systems introduces the Kimal IVantage infusion pump (June 1st, 2010)

Debiotech and EPFL receive the CTI Medtech Award 2008 in Bern

(September 2nd, 2008)

STMicroelectronics and Debiotech Announce First Prototypes of Disposable Insulin Nanopump.

(June 23th, 2008)

Gambro and Debiotech enter global partnership agreement in the area of Peritoneal Dialysis.

(March 19th, 2008)

Strategic agreement with STMicroelectronics regarding Debiotech’s

Insulin Nanopump

(April 19th, 2007)

Debiotech receives a Swiss Technology Award for its Renal Exprés

(March 1st, 2007)

CT Exprés III receives FDA clearance

(January 2nd, 2007)

Debiotech receives the Frost & Sullivan Enabling Technology 2006 Award

(November 13th, 2006)

Debiotech receives the Frost & Sullivan Entrepreneurial Company Award 2006

(July 7th, 2006)

Debiotech’s IV Pump receives the 2006 Medical Design Excellence Award

(April 10th, 2006)

Debiotech S.A. and EPFL in a collaborative alliance in the field of drug-eluting coatings.

(February 14th, 2006)

Debiotech receives a Swiss Technology Award 2006 and the Vontobel Prize

(January 27th, 2006)

IV Expres sales by Delphi Medical reach over $100 million in bookings

(December 7th, 2005)

Debioject® Reconstitution System to be used by Watson pharmaceuticals in the US

(April 29th, 2005)

Debiotech collaboration with EPFL on Dialysis

(November 29th, 2004)

Interview of Dr. Frederic Neftel, CEO of Debiotech, by the Wall street Reporter

(July 9th, 2004)

Debiotech announces license agreement with

DELPHI Medical Systems

(june 29th, 2004)

Debiotech receives the 2004 Medical Design Excellence Award (MDEA)

(june 16th, 2004)

Debiotech as “World Class” company in the Swiss financial HandelsZeitung

(june 9th, 2004)

Based on an ultra-miniaturized and highly precise MEMS pump

chip technology, developed and manufactured in partnership with

ST Microelectronics, the JewelPUMP is addressing still unmet needs

for diabetic patients.

“The JewelPUMP is the result of a tremendous effort to bring the

best of what advanced technology can offer for the benefit of the

patient, while complying with newly established regulatory

requirements for insulin pumps,” says Frédéric Neftel, MD, President

and CEO of DEBIOTECH SA. “We not only wanted to make the pump

really small, extremely safe and accurate, we also wanted to make

it really convenient to use while being concealed and so discreet

that you would forget you are under pump therapy. The results we

had the pleasure to present at the EASD are aligned with those

objectives thanks to an entirely new integrated platform of products

intended to fulfill diabetic patients needs and the latest regulatory

requirements. The comments and encouragements we received

from the large number of visitors we welcomed in our booth in

Berlin are certainly the greatest reward our

engineers and technicians could get for their intense work and

commitment to diabetes care.”

Source : http://www.debiotech.com/

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Dexcom G4 Platinum Continuous Glucose Monitor Cleared

Dexcom G4 Platinum Continuous Glucose Monitor Cleared

Dexcom G4 Platinum Continuous Glucose Monitor Cleared

New Device for Diabetes Management is Most-Advanced CGM Available with up to 30% Improvement in Hypoglycemic Accuracy

SAN DIEGO–(BUSINESS WIRE)– Dexcom (NASDAQ: DXCM), a leader in continuous glucose monitoring, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved its eagerly anticipated new continuous glucose monitoring system, the Dexcom G4™ PLATINUM.

Clinical trials report up to approximately 19 percent improvement in overall accuracy for the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM compared to the Seven Plus, and approximately a 30 percent improvement in accuracy in the hypoglycemia range (i.e., when blood glucose is less than 70mg/dl). The overall accuracy and ease of use for the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM sets a new standard for commercially available CGMs, making the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM the most-advanced CGM system available.

“Improved accuracy in the critical hypoglycemic range is most important from a life-saving point of view,” said Terrance H. Gregg, Dexcom CEO. “The Dexcom G4 PLATINUM fulfills the promise of CGM for people with diabetes by providing accurate and reliable real-time performance.”

Continuous glucose monitoring is considered the most significant breakthrough in diabetes management in the past 40 years. The traditional standard-of-care for glucose (blood sugar) measurement has been a finger stick meter. Although they remain an essential part of a comprehensive diabetes management program, finger stick meters are inherently limited by the fact that, like a photograph, it only provides data for the specific moment in which the measurement is completed; it doesn’t show whether glucose is going up or down — or how fast.

By contrast, CGM provides an in-motion picture that shows not only glucose levels, but also the speed and direction in which it is moving, and alerts the user to sudden changes so they can take action.

The Dexcom G4 PLATINUM offers not only outstanding accuracy and performance, but many new capabilities, including:

Longest transmission range, enabling improved patient flexibility and convenience

A smaller, discrete profile that fits busy lifestyles

A first-of-its-kind color LCD display for easy viewing

Customizable alerts with specific tones

“Hypo alert” setting at 55 mg/dl that provides an increased level of safety — a feature that no other device has.

An ideal and convenient tool for diabetes management

The Dexcom G4 PLATINUM CGM system consists of just three parts: a sensor, transmitter, and monitor.

The tiny sensor – about the diameter of a human hair —is inserted by the user under the skin on the abdomen. A small transmitter sends data wirelessly to a sleek and small monitor, which easily fits in a purse or pocket. It provides data every 5 minutes for up to 7 consecutive days, quickly and easily showing the body’s response to medication, food and exercise. If users are outside their target zones, configurable alarms alert them so that they can take action.

The Dexcom G4 PLATINUM is prescribed by a physician and covered by most insurance plans for people taking insulin, and is indicated for use as an adjunctive device to complement, not replace, information obtained from standard home glucose monitoring devices. The company plans to begin taking orders for the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM immediately and expects to begin shipping to patients within the next several weeks. For more information, visit www.dexcom.com.

About Dexcom, Inc.

DexCom, Inc., headquartered in San Diego, California, is developing and marketing continuous glucose monitoring systems for ambulatory use by patients with diabetes and by healthcare providers in the hospital.

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward Looking Statements

DexCom is a medical device company with a limited operating history. Successful commercialization of the company’s products is subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, including a lack of acceptance in the marketplace by physicians and patients, the inability to manufacture products in commercial quantities at an acceptable cost, possible delays in the company’s development programs, the inability of patients to receive reimbursement from third-party payors and inadequate financial and other resources. Certain of these risks and uncertainties, in addition to other risks, are more fully described in the company’s quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the period ended June 30, 2012, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on August 6, 2012.

Amy Tenderich over at DiabetesMine is documenting her trial of the DexCom SEVEN, a continuous glucose monitor, that we initially covered back in 2005.

Dexcom (San Diego, CA) received FDA clearance for its G4 Platinum continuous glucose monitoring system. It includes an under-skin sensor, a wireless transmitter, and the interactive monitor that picks up readings from within 20 feet (6 meters).

This is a considerably improved device over their slightly older Seven Plus model, offering greater accuracy in trials, a significantly cooler look, and a new display that charts glucose levels and displays alerts.

Clinical trials report up to approximately 19 percent improvement in overall accuracy for the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM compared to the Seven Plus, and approximately a 30 percent improvement in accuracy in the hypoglycemia range (i.e., when blood glucose is less than 70mg/dl). The overall accuracy and ease of use for the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM sets a new standard for commercially available CGMs, making the Dexcom G4 PLATINUM the most-advanced CGM system available.

dexcom transmitter Dexcom G4 Platinum Continuous Glucose Monitor Cleared in U.S. (video)The Dexcom G4 PLATINUM offers not only outstanding accuracy and performance, but many new capabilities, including:

Longest transmission range, enabling improved patient flexibility and convenience

A smaller, discrete profile that fits busy lifestyles

A first-of-its-kind color LCD display for easy viewing

Customizable alerts with specific tones

“Hypo alert” setting at 55 mg/dl that provides an increased level of safety – a feature that no other device has.

Source : http://investor.shareholder.com/dexcom/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=711758

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