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Global EEG Equipment Market Analysis by Applications, Competitors and Forecast to 2021

Global EEG Equipment Market Analysis by Applications, Competitors and Forecast to 2021

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The Global EEG Equipment Market research study report is a respected source of information which offers a telescopic view of the current market status. Various key factors are discussed in the report, which will help the buyer in studying the Global EEG Equipment market trends and opportunities. The Global EEG Equipment market is a highly diligent study on competitive landscape analysis, prime manufacturers, marketing strategies analysis, Market Effect Factor Analysis and Consumer Needs by major regions, types, applications in Global market considering the past, current and future state of the Global EEG Equipment industry. The report provides a thorough overview of the Global EEG Equipment Market including definitions, classifications, applications and chain structure.

This Research study focus on these types: –

  • Video EEG Equipment
  • Dynamic EEG Equipment
  • Conventional EEG Equipment

This Research study focus on these applications: –

  • Hospitals
  • Clinics
  • Others

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This report studies Interferons in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with Production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering

  • Nihon Kohden
  • Natus Medical
  • Noraxon
  • EB NEURO
  • Cadwell Ind
  • NCC
  • NR Sign
  • SMICC
  • CONTEC
  • RMS
  • EGI
  • SYMTOP
  • Hunan Yi Ling
  • Stellate Systems
  • NeuroSky

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Several important areas are covered in this Global EEG Equipment market research report. Some key points among them: –

  1. What Overview Global EEG Equipment Says? This Overview Includes Diligent Analysis of Scope, Types, Application, Sales by region, manufacturers, types and applications
  2. What Is Global EEG Equipment Competition considering Manufacturers, Types and Application? Based on Thorough Research of Key Factors
  3. Who Are Global EEG Equipment Global Key Manufacturers? Along with this survey you also get their Product Information (Type, Application and Specification)
  4. Global EEG Equipment’s Manufacturing Cost Analysis –This Analysis is done by considering these prime elements like Key RAW Materials, Price Trends, Market Concentration Rate of Raw Materials, Proportion of Raw Materials and Labour Cost in Manufacturing Cost Structure
  5. Global EEG Equipment Industrial Chain Analysis
  6. Global EEG Equipment Marketing strategies analysis by
  7. Market Positioning
  8. Pricing and Branding Strategy
  9. Client Targeting
  10. Global EEG Equipment Effect Factor Analysis
  11. Technology Process/Risk Considering Substitute Threat and Technology Progress In Global EEG Equipment Industry
  12. Consumer Needs or What Change Is Observed in Preference of Customer
  13. Political/Economical Change
  14. What is Global EEG Equipment forecast (2016-2021) Considering Sales, Revenue for Regions, Types and Applications?

Topics such as sales and sales revenue overview, production market share by product type, capacity and production overview, import, export, and consumption are covered under the development trend section of the Global EEG Equipment market report.

Lastly, the feasibility analysis of new project investment is done in the report, which consist of a detailed SWOT analysis of the Global EEG Equipment market. Both established and new players in the Global EEG Equipment industry can use this report for complete understanding of the market.

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Some of key Tables and Figures included in this research study: –

  1. Figure Picture of Global EEG Equipment
  2. Figure USA, Europe, China. Southeast Asia, India, Japan Global EEG Equipment Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021)
  3. Table Production Base and Market Concentration Rate of Raw Material
  4. Figure Manufacturing Cost Structure of Global EEG Equipment
  5. Figure Manufacturing Process Analysis of Global EEG Equipment
  6. Figure Global EEG Equipment Industrial Chain Analysis
  7. Figure Global EEG Equipment Sales and Growth Rate Forecast (2016-2021)
  8. Figure Global EEG Equipment Revenue and Growth Rate Forecast (2016-2021)
  9. Table Global EEG Equipment Sales Forecast by Regions (2016-2021)
  10. Table Global EEG Equipment Sales Forecast by Type (2016-2021)
  11. Table Global EEG Equipment Sales Forecast by Application (2016-2021)

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Medical Laser Systems Market: Complete Study of Current Trends in the Market, Industry Growth Drivers

LASER stands for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiations. It possesses properties such as high monochromaticity, coherence and directionality which attributes to its strong penetration power. Lasers are widely used as a tool in surgery and diagnosis.

Some of the major product types encompassing the medical laser systems market are diode lasers, solid state lasers, gas lasers and dye lasers. This position is majorly attributed to their use in an array of medical applications such as photodynamic therapy, numerous aesthetic treatments such as hair and wrinkle removal, liposuction and tooth whitening; and surgical treatments. Diode laser market held the largest market share in the global medical laser systems market in 2011 and is sub-segmented into following subtypes of lasers: Ho:Yag laser, Nd:Yag laser, Er:Yag laser, KTP laser, Alexandrite and Ruby Lasers.

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Amongst all these sub-segments of the solid state laser systems, in 2011, neodymium yttrium aluminum garnet lasers held the largest market share of the total solid state laser systems market and is expected to maintain its position in 2018. Its applicability to treat ailments in several medical fields such as dermatology, gastroenterology, urology, ophthalmology and gynecology justifies its position.

The holmium yttrium aluminum garnet lasers are expected to grow at the fastest CAGR of over 16% during 2012 to 2018. It finds medical application in the field of dermatology, urology and cardiology. Increasing demand of cosmetic procedures such as pigment lesion, tattoo and birthmark removal, temporary hair removal and wrinkle treatment contribute to the high growth rate of these laser systems.

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The medical laser systems market is segmented on the basis of applications into eight major divisions, viz. ophthalmology, dermatology, gynecology, urology, dentistry, cardiovascular diseases and other applications such as rheumatology, traumatology, gastroenterology, etc. The cardiovascular segment of the medical laser systems market is expected to be the fastest growing market owing to the increase in the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and development of cost effective treatment techniques.

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The overall medical laser systems market is segmented into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and rest of the world. Among these regions, the North America medical laser systems market held majority of the market share in 2011 followed by Europe. Surgical procedures in Europe have taken a back seat to non-surgical, minimally invasive, anti-aging treatments. In the areas of skincare and dermatology, the focus has now shifted from conventional methods of treatment to advance technologies. It is no longer just about filling lines with hyaluronic acid or erasing wrinkles with a neurotoxin. Today, physicians are treating skin, for compactness and uniformity which can be accomplished through new generation of technically advanced aesthetic laser treatment. People who have undergone cosmetic treatments about 10 years ago have reached the age of 60 by now and there is a complete transformation in the scenario with regard to their demand for surgical processes. This has resulted in an increased demand for non-invasive cosmetic procedures, thus boosting medical laser market.

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Laser System Creates Near Perfect Lens Pocket for Cataract Surgery

Laser System Creates Near Perfect Lens Pocket for Cataract Surgery

Laser System Creates Near Perfect Lens Pocket for Cataract Surgery

Imagine trying to cut by hand a perfect circle roughly one-third the size of a penny. Then consider that instead of a sheet of paper, you’re working with a scalpel and a thin, elastic, transparent layer of tissue, which both offers resistance and tears easily. And, by the way, you’re doing it inside someone’s eye, and a slip could result in a serious impairment to vision.

This standard step in cataract surgery — the removal of a disc from the capsule surrounding the eye’s lens, a procedure known as capsulorhexis — is one of the few aspects of the operation that has yet to be enhanced by technology, but new developments in guided lasers could soon eliminate the need for such manual dexterity. A paper from Stanford University School of Medicine, published Nov. 17 in Science Translational Medicine, presents clinical findings about how one new system for femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery is not only safe but also cuts circles in lens capsules that are 12 times more precise than those achieved by the traditional method, as well as leaving edges that are twice as strong in the remaining capsule, which serves as a pocket in which the surgeon places the plastic replacement lens.

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“The results were much better in a number of ways — increasing safety, improving precision and reproducibility, and standardizing the procedure,” said Daniel Palanker, PhD, associate professor of ophthalmology, who is the lead author of the paper. “Many medical residents are fearful of doing capsulorhexis, and it can be challenging to learn. This new approach could make this procedure less dependent on surgical skill and allow for greater consistency.” The senior author is William Culbertson, MD, professor of ophthalmology at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at the University of Miami.

While the technology to perform this new approach — called a capsulotomy instead of capsulorhexis — is being developed by a number of private companies, this paper focuses on a specific system being produced by OpticaMedica Corp. of Santa Clara, Calif., which funded the study. Palanker, Culbertson and five other co-authors have equity stakes in the company; the remaining seven co-authors are company employees.

Cataract surgery is the most commonly performed surgery in the nation, with more than 1.5 million of these procedures done annually. The operation is necessary when a cloud forms in the eye’s lens, causing blurred and double vision and sensitivity to light and glare, among other symptoms.

Courtesy of Daniel Palanker description of photo

Representative examples of lens capsule extraction by manual capsulorhexis (Row A) are not as close to being perfect circles and less uniform than those from laser capsulotomy (Row B).

The current procedure involves making an incision in the eye and then performing capsulorhexis: in that step, the paper explains, “The size, shape and position of the anterior capsular opening … is controlled by a freehand pulling and tearing the capsular tissue.” After that, the lens is broken up with an ultrasound probe and suctioned out. The surgery culminates with the placement — as snugly as possible — of an artificial intraocular lens in the empty pocket created in the capsule. Before closing the eye, the surgeon may make additional incisions in the cornea to prevent or lessen astigmatism.

With the new system, a laser can pass through the outer tissue — without the eye being opened — to cut the hole in the capsule and to slice up the cataract and lens, all of which occurs just before the patient enters the operating suite. The laser also creates a multi-planar incision through the cornea that stops just below the outermost surface, which means that the surgeon needs to cut less once the operation begins, as well as decreasing the risk of infection. Because of the laser work, once the operation is under way, the removal of the cut section of the capsule and the sliced-up lens can be done relatively easily, with much less need for the ultrasound energy.

Femtosecond lasers, which deliver pulses of energy per quadrillionths of a second, were already being widely and successfully used to reshape the cornea of the eye to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatisms. For use in cataract surgery, however, the laser would need to cut tissue deep inside the eye. While the laser would need to reach a level of intensity strong enough to ionize tissue at a selected focal point, it would also have to have pulse energy and average power low enough to avoid collateral damage to the surrounding tissue, retina and other parts of the eye.

Palanker and his team found the proper balance through a series of experiments on enucleated porcine and human eyes. They then did further experiments to confirm that a laser at those settings would not cause retinal damage.

Still, a major hurdle remained. The laser needed to be guided as it made its incisions to ensure that it did not go astray, cutting nearby tissue, and that it would meet exacting specifications for the size of the disc-shaped hole in the lens capsule that it would be creating. The solution? Use optical coherence tomography — a noncontact, noninvasive in vivo imaging technique — to get a three-dimensional map of the eye. Using that image, he and his colleagues developed software that pinpoints the ideal pattern for the laser to follow. It is then superimposed on a three-dimensional picture of the patient’s eye, so that the surgeon can confirm it’s on track before starting the procedure, in addition to monitoring it as the cutting proceeds.

“Until this, we had no way to quantify the precision, no way to measure the size and shape of the capsular opening,” Palanker said.

A clinical trial in 50 patients revealed no significant adverse events, supporting the study’s goal of showing that the procedure is safe. What’s more, the laser-based system came much closer to adhering to the intended size of the capsular disc (typically coming within 25 micrometers with the laser vs. 305 micrometers in the manual procedure). And using a measurement that ranks a perfect circle as a 1.0, the researchers found that the laser-based technique scored about .95 as compared with about .77 for the manual approach to cutting the disc from the capsule.

What this means is that when the plastic intraocular lens is placed in the capsular bag, it’s going to be better centered and have a tighter fit, reducing the chances of a lens shift and improving the alignment of the lens with the pupil. This is increasingly important as more patients choose to have multifocal and accommodating lenses, which need to be aligned more precisely with the pupil to function well.

The laser-assisted surgery offered other benefits aside from the capsulotomy. The paper notes that because the laser has already spliced the lens, there’s less need to use the ultrasound probe. Its excessive use in hard cataracts can sometimes create too much heat and damage the corneal endothelium and other surrounding tissue. The laser also can create a multi-planar zigzag pattern for the incision in the cornea, allowing the incision to self-seal and decreasing the likelihood of infection and other complications.

While not an endpoint of the study, the researchers found that the new procedure did improve visual acuity more than the traditional approach; however, the difference was not statistically significant due to the small number of patients enrolled. Palanker said a properly designed clinical study is needed to quantify improvements in vision with various types of intraocular lenses; such research may take place in the United States if the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves the new machine. Data from Palanker’s study is going to be submitted to the FDA for consideration.

“This will undoubtedly affect millions of people, as cataracts are so common,” said Palanker, though he expects that it will take time for the new procedure to be adopted. At present, the new procedure takes longer than the current standard, and it would cost more, with Medicare unlikely to cover it in the immediate future. “But there will be people who elect to have it done the new way if they can afford it. There are competitors coming out with related systems. This is what’s exciting. This technology is going to be picked up in the clinic.”

The other Stanford co- author is Mark Blumenkranz, MD, professor and chair of ophthalmology. Information about the Department of Ophthalmology, which also supported the work, is available at http://ophthalmology.stanford.edu/.

About one-third of people in the developed world will undergo cataract surgery in their lifetime. Although marked improvements in surgical technique have occurred since the development of the current approach to lens replacement in the late 1960s and early 1970s, some critical steps of the procedure can still only be executed with limited precision. Current practice requires manual formation of an opening in the anterior lens capsule, fragmentation and evacuation of the lens tissue with an ultrasound probe, and implantation of a plastic intraocular lens into the remaining capsular bag. The size, shape, and position of the anterior capsular opening (one of the most critical steps in the procedure) are controlled by freehand pulling and tearing of the capsular tissue. Here, we report a technique that improves the precision and reproducibility of cataract surgery by performing anterior capsulotomy, lens segmentation, and corneal incisions with a femtosecond laser. The placement of the cuts was determined by imaging the anterior segment of the eye with integrated optical coherence tomography. Femtosecond laser produced continuous anterior capsular incisions, which were twice as strong and more than five times as precise in size and shape than manual capsulorhexis. Lens segmentation and softening simplified its emulsification and removal, decreasing the perceived cataract hardness by two grades. Three-dimensional cutting of the cornea guided by diagnostic imaging creates multiplanar self-sealing incisions and allows exact placement of the limbal relaxing incisions, potentially increasing the safety and performance of cataract surgery.

Though cataract surgery requires millimeter precision, it is still very much a manual procedure requiring steady hands on the part of the surgeon. A new system, developed at Stanford and being commercialized by OpticaMedica Corp. of Santa Clara, CA, uses a combination of a femto-second laser and integrated optical coherence tomography to precisely perform lens capsule extraction. Though current methodology is already relatively safe, the new system may lead to effectively error-free procedures and higher pupil alignment precision required for multifocal and accommodating lenses.

With the new system, a laser can pass through the outer tissue — without the eye being opened — to cut the hole in the capsule and to slice up the cataract and lens, all of which occurs just before the patient enters the operating suite. The laser also creates a multi-planar incision through the cornea that stops just below the outermost surface, which means that the surgeon needs to cut less once the operation begins, as well as decreasing the risk of infection. Because of the laser work, once the operation is under way, the removal of the cut section of the capsule and the sliced-up lens can be done relatively easily, with much less need for the ultrasound energy.

A clinical trial in 50 patients revealed no significant adverse events, supporting the study’s goal of showing that the procedure is safe. What’s more, the laser-based system came much closer to adhering to the intended size of the capsular disc (typically coming within 25 micrometers with the laser vs. 305 micrometers in the manual procedure). And using a measurement that ranks a perfect circle as a 1.0, the researchers found that the laser-based technique scored about .95 as compared with about .77 for the manual approach to cutting the disc from the capsule.

The laser-assisted surgery offered other benefits aside from the capsulotomy. The paper notes that because the laser has already spliced the lens, there’s less need to use the ultrasound probe. Its excessive use in hard cataracts can sometimes create too much heat and damage the corneal endothelium and other surrounding tissue. The laser also can create a multi-planar zigzag pattern for the incision in the cornea, allowing the incision to self-seal and decreasing the likelihood of infection and other complications.

Source : http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/2/58/58ra85.abstract?sid=ec6471aa-42de-4b1c-ac1f-c7f3ea0991ed

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Laser-Powered Microbots Gently Transport Live Cells

Laser-Powered Microbots Gently Transport Live Cells

Laser-Powered Microbots Gently Transport Live Cells

We’re used to thinking of robots as mechanical entities, but at very small scales, it sometimes becomes easier to use existing structures (like microorganisms that respond to magnetic fields or even swarms of bacteria) instead of trying to design and construct one (or lots) of teeny tiny artificial machines. Aaron Ohta’s lab at the University of Hawaii at Manoa has come up with a novel new way of creating non-mechanical microbots quite literally out of thin air, using robots made of bubbles with engines made of lasers.

To get the bubble robots to move around in this saline solution, a 400 mW 980nm (that’s infrared) laser is shone through the bubble onto the heat-absorbing surface of the working area. The fluid that the bubbles are in tries to move from the hot area where the laser is pointing towards the colder side of the bubble, and this fluid flow pushes the bubble towards the hot area. Moving the laser to different sides of the bubble gives you complete 360 degree steering, and since the velocity of the bubble is proportional to the intensity of the laser, you can go as slow as you want or as fast as about 4 mm/s.

This level of control allows for very fine manipulation of small objects, and the picture below shows how a bubble robot has pushed glass beads around to form the letters “UH” (for University of Hawaii, of course):

Besides being able to create as many robots as you want of differing sizes out of absolutely nothing (robot construction just involves a fine-tipped syringe full of air), the laser-controlled bubbles have another big advantage over more common microbots in that it’s possible to control many different bubbles independently using separate lasers or light patterns from a digital projector. With magnetically steered microbots, they all like to go wherever the magnetic field points them as one big herd, but the bubbles don’t have that problem, since each just needs its own independent spot of light to follow around.

The researchers are currently investigating how to use teams of tiny bubbles to cooperatively transport and assemble microbeads into complex shapes, and they hope to eventually develop a system that can provide real-time autonomous control based on visual feedback. Eventually, it may be possible to conjure swarms of microscopic bubble robots out of nothing, set them to work building microstructures with an array of thermal lasers, and then when they’re finished, give each one a little pop to wipe it completely out of existence without any mess or fuss.

Cooperative Micromanipulation Using Optically Controlled Bubble Microrobots by Wenqi Hu, Kelly S. Ishii, and Aaron T. Ohta of the the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, was presented last week at the 2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation in St. Paul, Minn.

Microrobots

This project involves the manipulation and the assembly of micro-objects using optically controlled microrobots. Light patterns are used to control the movement of the microrobots. Objectives include the micro-assembly of objects, including live cells, and the parallel, independent control of multiple microrobots in one system.

At the 2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, researchers from the University of Hawaii showed off amazing new bubble microbots they created purely out of air.

The tiny bubbles are powered and directed within a saline solution by an infrared laser. The technique relies on heating the solution with the laser at the periphery of the bubble causing the liquid to want to flow away from the warm spot and propelling the bubble toward it.

The team demonstrated that live cells encapsulated within hydrogel blocks can be ferried around with great precision without doing them any harm. See for yourself in this video from University of Hawaii’s Microdevices & Microfluidics Lab.

Source : http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/industrial-robots/microbots-made-from-bubbles-and-lasers

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