Archive for ‘Blood Pressure’

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Sunlight may lower your blood pressure

Sunlight may lower your blood pressure

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Warnings to stay out of the sun may be overlooking a potentially important health benefit of sunshine, new findings suggest. While too much sun exposure may bring on skin cancer, researchers have found evidence and getting some rays couldbe protect against high blood pressure, a condition known as the silent killer.

Researchers in the United Kingdom gave healthy study volunteers a dose of Ultraviolent-A (UVA) radiation in the lab, corresponding to what they would receive while under the sun for about 30 minutes during summer in Southern Europe. In response, the participants’ blood vessels dilated, and their blood pressure decreased, the researchers report.

High blood pressure also known as hypertension, can lead to potentially fatal cardiovascular diseases, such as heart failure or stroke, although some people may not even know they have it.

A number of risk factors for hypertension including smoking, inactivity and eating a high sodium diet are well known. “But sunlight and the potential contribution the skin may make has never been on the radar.

While its unclear exactly how sun exposure could lower blood pressure, so the researchers suggested that a compound called nitric oxide and other chemicals derived from it, including nitrite and nitrate, play a role.

Scientists know that nitric oxide plays a role in regulating the blood pressure. Cells in the inner lining of blood vessels produce nitric oxide to relax, or dilate, the vessels, reducing the pressure against which the heart must work.

While some nitric oxide and the molecules derived from it circulate in the blood, a much larger storage pool has been found in skin. Feelisch and his colleagues proposed that sunlight somehow mobilizes these molecules, so they travel from skin to blood, where they dilate blood vessels and lower blood pressure.Their results support their hypothesis, while alternative explanations that blood pressure drop was due to the light’s warmth, or to changes in study participants’ nitrite or nitrate consumption did not hold up when tested, the researchers said.

The team noted that the changes they documented may appear small, however any reduction in the blood pressure helps protect against dying cardiovascular disease.Many unknowns remain, they said. For instance, its not clear if a person’s blood pressure would continue to drop after repeated UVA exposure, or if the response to sunlight would vary depending on a persons age, sex and disease.

If an unrelated process,sunlight also helps the body synthesize the vitamin D.

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Tirofiban effectively prevents strokes in high risk patients

Tirofiban effectively prevents strokes in high risk patients

Scientists may have discovered a new way to prevent strokes in high risk patients, according to research from the University of Warwick and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW).

Work by a new research group, led by Professor Donald Singer, Professor of Therapeutics at Warwick Medical School and Professor Chris Imray from UHCW, has now been published in US journal Stroke.

The group is using ultrasound scanning to look at patients with carotid artery disease, one of the major causes of stroke. Clots can form on diseased carotid arteries in the neck. Small parts of these clots can released to form microemboli, which can travel to block key brain arteries and lead to weakness, disturbed speech, loss of vision and other serious stroke syndromes. Standard anti-platelet drugs such as aspirin may not prevent the formation of harmful microemboli.

The scanning process can be used to find patients at very high risk of stroke because microemboli have formed despite prior anti-platelet drugs. Using scanning, the team has found that tirofiban, another anti-platelet drug designed to inhibit the formation of blood clots, can suppress microemboli where previous treatment such as aspirin has been ineffective. In their study, tirofiban was more effective than other ‘rescue’ treatment.

Professor Singer said: “These findings show that the choice of rescue medicine is very important when carotid patients develop microemboli despite previous treatment with powerful anti-platelet drugs such as aspirin. We now need to go on to further studies of anti-microemboli rescue treatments, to aim for the right balance between protection and risk for our patients.”

Professor Imray said: “These findings show the importance of ultrasound testing for micro-emboli in carotid disease patients. These biomarkers of high stroke risk cannot be predicted just from assessing the severity of risk factors such as smoking history, cholesterol and blood pressure.”

Source : http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121122/Tirofiban-effectively-prevents-strokes-in-high-risk-patients.aspx

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Tirofiban effectively prevents strokes in high risk patients

Tirofiban effectively prevents strokes in high risk patients

Scientists may have discovered a new way to prevent strokes in high risk patients, according to research from the University of Warwick and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW).

Work by a new research group, led by Professor Donald Singer, Professor of Therapeutics at Warwick Medical School and Professor Chris Imray from UHCW, has now been published in US journal Stroke.

The group is using ultrasound scanning to look at patients with carotid artery disease, one of the major causes of stroke. Clots can form on diseased carotid arteries in the neck. Small parts of these clots can released to form microemboli, which can travel to block key brain arteries and lead to weakness, disturbed speech, loss of vision and other serious stroke syndromes. Standard anti-platelet drugs such as aspirin may not prevent the formation of harmful microemboli.

The scanning process can be used to find patients at very high risk of stroke because microemboli have formed despite prior anti-platelet drugs. Using scanning, the team has found that tirofiban, another anti-platelet drug designed to inhibit the formation of blood clots, can suppress microemboli where previous treatment such as aspirin has been ineffective. In their study, tirofiban was more effective than other ‘rescue’ treatment.

Professor Singer said: “These findings show that the choice of rescue medicine is very important when carotid patients develop microemboli despite previous treatment with powerful anti-platelet drugs such as aspirin. We now need to go on to further studies of anti-microemboli rescue treatments, to aim for the right balance between protection and risk for our patients.”

Professor Imray said: “These findings show the importance of ultrasound testing for micro-emboli in carotid disease patients. These biomarkers of high stroke risk cannot be predicted just from assessing the severity of risk factors such as smoking history, cholesterol and blood pressure.”

Source : http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121122/Tirofiban-effectively-prevents-strokes-in-high-risk-patients.aspx

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euHeart Computer Modeling Project Aims to Build a Virtual Heart

euHeart Computer Modeling Project Aims to Build a Virtual Heart

euHeart Computer Modeling Project Aims to Build a Virtual Heart

Every year, 18,000 psychiatric client separations take place in Dutch mental healthcare facilities. Philips and GGzE are investigating an alternative for separation and hope to introduce a new care concept, which is embedded in a permanent research project. Today, Philips and GGzE jointly open the newly built High Care Unit at the GGzE premises in Eindhoven. In this unit an Ambient Experience for Mental Healthcare pilot concept is installed. This care concept is based on the Philips Ambient Experience solution and uses a unique combination of dynamic light, sound and projection. It is intended to reduce the clients’ stress and anxiety by supporting and involving them in their own care. With this new care concept Philips and GGzE aspire to reduce the number of psychiatric client separations. GGzE is the world’s first institution to install this innovative prototype in its High Care Unit.

Placing a client in separation is a last resort for both the client and the caregiver. Research indicates that, on average, a client placed in separation spends twice as long in a mental healthcare institution. This can lead to traumatization of the client, demotivation of the caregiver due to feelings of powerlessness, and increasing healthcare costs for the institution and the government.

Philips Ambient Experience as starting point

When Philips and GGzE started their research into a new concept –intended to increase the well-being of both psychiatric clients as well as staff– where better to start than with the tried and tested Philips Ambient Experience solution? This solution integrates architecture, design and enabling technologies such as dynamic lighting, video projections and sound. It allows patients to personalize their environment and surround themselves in a relaxing atmosphere before they will undergo, for example, an MRI scan. Today, more than 400 hospitals globally have installed the Philips Ambient Experience in a range of clinical environments.

Exploring new workflows to reduce stress and anxiety

GGzE and Philips took the Philips Ambient Experience’s key features from the hospital environment to a mental healthcare environment, and applied this when investigating the entire workflow. From the very start when a client that is about to escalate enters the High Care Unit, to the point when the client has returned to a calmer state and can leave the High Care Unit. From the intake room, through the hallway, to the support room; everything is designed with the intention to provide the client control and distraction and give the client the opportunity to maintain communication with the outside world. Our hope is that this may lead to a decrease of stress and discomfort and ultimately give the client a safe and secure feeling.

Involving clients in their own care

The client can select an Ambient Experience theme which he or she finds comforting, meaning the entire high care unit transforms in this theme. Dynamic cove lighting beckons the client gently towards the support room, so that the need for coaxing by the caregiver may become redundant. The support room’s main asset is a large interactive wall. Its multiple-option screen can display nature scenes that have the aim to reduce stress levels. And when the client is more responsive to stimulus, he or she can engage in activities that may support recovery and help in analysis and treatment.

Future plans for this research concept

This new care concept is a first in the world pilot installment. “At our new high care facility, we want to provide outstanding care in a healing environment, in line with our Planetree-approach*,” says Marie-Louise Vossen, GGzE Board Member. “We would like clients in a crisis situation to experience how they can rapidly regain control, through dynamic light, sound and image.”

“A great deal of research still needs to be done; we will investigate if separation rooms as we know them today ideally can be replaced by these kind of Ambient Experience support rooms in the near future,” concludes Werner Satter, General Manager Philips Ambient Experience. “We are continuing our research into this newly-entered area of health and well-being and aspire to create optimal treatment solutions, reducing the number of psychiatric patient separations and increasing the client’s and the staff’s well-being.”

*Planetree is an integrated approach which aims to provide more personal, human and patient-centered healthcare.

Philips Electronics is leading a new EU project to design a virtual heart that can be used as a model for research on the organ.

The euHeart consortium aims to develop advanced computer models of the human heart that can be personalized to patient-specific conditions using clinical data from various sources, such as CT (Computed Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scans, measurements of blood flow and blood pressure in the coronary arteries (which feed the heart muscles) and ECGs (Electrocardiograms).

These computer models will integrate the behavior of the heart and the aorta at molecular, cellular, tissue and organ-level. They will also incorporate clinical knowledge about how cardiovascular disease disturbs the correct functioning of the heart at these levels. As a result, it may be possible to develop simulation tools that doctors can use to predict the outcome of different types of therapy, and because the models will be personalized to individual patients, the therapy could be equally personalized.

“euHeart is a very exciting project that will bring together the latest advances in modeling and computing to improve the care of patients with heart disease,” says Professor Reza Razavi, the Project’s Clinical Coordinator who is also Professor of Paediatric Cardiovascular Science and Head of the Division of Imaging Sciences at King’s College London (London, United Kingdom). “It may ultimately allow us to select and optimize the best treatment for individual patients.”

As an example, one way of treating heart rhythm disorders is a minimally invasive procedure known as radio-frequency ablation. During this procedure, a catheter is inserted into the patient’s heart and the tissue responsible for propagating abnormal electrical signals through the heart muscle is destroyed using heat from a radio-frequency field generated at the tip of the catheter. At the moment, doctors have to rely on their experience to decide which areas of tissue to destroy – a task that is complicated by the fact that the electrical activity in every patient’s heart is subtly different. With the aid of a computerized model that reflects the patient’s unique heart structure and function, doctors may be able to test the results of destroying different areas of tissue before they have to operate on the patient.

Source : http://www.newscenter.philips.com/main/standard/news/press/2012/20121003-philips-and-ggze-aim-to-reduce-psychiatric-client-separations.wpd#.UK7YgavVYQs

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Tirofiban effectively prevents strokes in high risk patients

Tirofiban effectively prevents strokes in high risk patients

Scientists may have discovered a new way to prevent strokes in high risk patients, according to research from the University of Warwick and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW).

Work by a new research group, led by Professor Donald Singer, Professor of Therapeutics at Warwick Medical School and Professor Chris Imray from UHCW, has now been published in US journal Stroke.

The group is using ultrasound scanning to look at patients with carotid artery disease, one of the major causes of stroke. Clots can form on diseased carotid arteries in the neck. Small parts of these clots can released to form microemboli, which can travel to block key brain arteries and lead to weakness, disturbed speech, loss of vision and other serious stroke syndromes. Standard anti-platelet drugs such as aspirin may not prevent the formation of harmful microemboli.

The scanning process can be used to find patients at very high risk of stroke because microemboli have formed despite prior anti-platelet drugs. Using scanning, the team has found that tirofiban, another anti-platelet drug designed to inhibit the formation of blood clots, can suppress microemboli where previous treatment such as aspirin has been ineffective. In their study, tirofiban was more effective than other ‘rescue’ treatment.

Professor Singer said: “These findings show that the choice of rescue medicine is very important when carotid patients develop microemboli despite previous treatment with powerful anti-platelet drugs such as aspirin. We now need to go on to further studies of anti-microemboli rescue treatments, to aim for the right balance between protection and risk for our patients.”

Professor Imray said: “These findings show the importance of ultrasound testing for micro-emboli in carotid disease patients. These biomarkers of high stroke risk cannot be predicted just from assessing the severity of risk factors such as smoking history, cholesterol and blood pressure.”

Source : http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121122/Tirofiban-effectively-prevents-strokes-in-high-risk-patients.aspx

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Ardian’s Hypertension Treatment Outperforms Traditional Medical Treatment in Clinical Trial

Ardian’s Hypertension Treatment Outperforms Traditional Medical Treatment in Clinical Trial

Ardian’s Hypertension Treatment Outperforms Traditional Medical Treatment in Clinical Trial

Background

Activation of renal sympathetic nerves is key to pathogenesis of essential hypertension. We aimed to assess effectiveness and safety of catheter-based renal denervation for reduction of blood pressure in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension.

Methods

In this multicentre, prospective, randomised trial, patients who had a baseline systolic blood pressure of 160 mm Hg or more (?150 mm Hg for patients with type 2 diabetes), despite taking three or more antihypertensive drugs, were randomly allocated in a one-to-one ratio to undergo renal denervation with previous treatment or to maintain previous treatment alone (control group) at 24 participating centres. Randomisation was done with sealed envelopes. Data analysers were not masked to treatment assignment. The primary effectiveness endpoint was change in seated office-based measurement of systolic blood pressure at 6 months. Primary analysis included all patients remaining in follow-up at 6 months. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00888433.

Findings

106 (56%) of 190 patients screened for eligibility were randomly allocated to renal denervation (n=52) or control (n=54) groups between June 9, 2009, and Jan 15, 2010. 49 (94%) of 52 patients who underwent renal denervation and 51 (94%) of 54 controls were assessed for the primary endpoint at 6 months. Office-based blood pressure measurements in the renal denervation group reduced by 32/12 mm Hg (SD 23/11, baseline of 178/96 mm Hg, p

Interpretation

Catheter-based renal denervation can safely be used to substantially reduce blood pressure in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients.

CHICAGO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Late-breaking data presented today at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2010 and simultaneously published in The Lancet demonstrated that the landmark Symplicity HTN-2 trial evaluating Ardian’s Symplicity® Catheter System™ met its primary endpoint.

“The impressive results of this study show that Ardian’s Symplicity System has the potential to become a truly revolutionary treatment”

The study showed that, after six months, patients treated with Ardian’s device experienced an average drop in blood pressure of 32/12 mmHg compared to an increase in blood pressure of 1/0 mmHg in the control group of patients treated with medical therapy alone (p<0.0001).

Research has shown that each incremental 20/10 mmHg increase of blood pressure above normal levels is associated with a doubling of cardiovascular mortality over a 10 year period1 and that reducing systolic blood pressure by as little as 5 mmHg can reduce the risk of stroke by almost 30 percent.2

“The impressive results of this study show that Ardian’s Symplicity System has the potential to become a truly revolutionary treatment,” said Murray Esler, M.D., Ph.D., principal investigator of the trial and associate director of the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute of Melbourne, Australia. “Combined with findings from the earlier Symplicity HTN-1 study, which demonstrated the safety and durability of the therapy out to two years, these results fuel our enthusiasm for the potential of this treatment to significantly impact the standard of care for the large number of patients suffering from this disease.”

The Symplicity HTN-2 trial was an international, multi-center, prospective, randomized, controlled study of the safety and effectiveness of renal denervation in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. One hundred-six patients were enrolled from 24 investigational sites. At baseline the randomized treatment and control patients had similar high blood pressures: 178/97 mmHg and 178/98 mmHg, respectively, despite both receiving an average daily regimen of five antihypertensive medications. After six months, the average blood pressure of the renal denervation group was reduced to 146/85 mmHg, compared to an average blood pressure of 179/98 mmHg for the control group.

The study also found that the therapy was safe, with no serious device or procedure-related events, no cardiovascular complications and no kidney-related complications.

“Hypertension is often described as a ‘silent killer’ as it frequently has no symptoms yet significantly increases a patient’s risk of heart attack, stroke or death,” said Andrew Cleeland, president and CEO of Ardian, Inc. “Positive data from the Symplicity HTN-2 trial reinforces our belief that this treatment has the potential to significantly improve the quality of life for the millions of people around the world with uncontrolled hypertension. We look forward to beginning a U.S. pivotal study of the device to gather data needed to bring this promising therapy to patients and physicians in the United States.”

About the Symplicity® Catheter System™

The Symplicity Catheter System is used to perform a procedure termed renal denervation (RDN). In a straight-forward endovascular procedure, similar to an angioplasty, the physician inserts the small, flexible Symplicity Catheter into the femoral artery in the upper thigh and threads it into the renal artery. Once in place within the renal artery, the device delivers low-power RF energy to deactivate the surrounding renal sympathetic nerves. This, in turn, reduces hyper-activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which is often the cause of chronic hypertension. The one-time procedure aims to permanently reduce blood pressure. RDN may also allow patients to reduce or eliminate the need for lifelong antihypertensive medications.

In addition to hypertension, the therapy may hold promise for treating heart failure, diabetes and chronic kidney disease, conditions also characterized by elevated sympathetic nerve activity. The Symplicity Catheter System has received CE Mark approval in the European Union and is investigational in the United States. Visit http://www.ardian.com/patients/symplicity.shtml to view an animation of the device and the procedure.

About Hypertension

Though it has no symptoms, hypertension (high blood pressure) is the number one risk factor for premature death worldwide, affecting about one in three adults.3 Nearly half of Europeans suffer from hypertension4 and in the United States, approximately 75 million people are affected, only two-thirds of whom are treated.5 Of those receiving treatment, approximately half are not achieving target blood pressure levels. The medications often prescribed for hypertension must be taken daily for the duration of a patient’s life, can be costly, and often result in side effects that can negatively impact quality of life. Globally, the estimated annual healthcare expenditure directly related to hypertension is approximately $500 billion.6

About Ardian

Privately held Ardian Inc., based in Mountain View, Calif., develops catheter-based therapies to treat hypertension and related conditions. Ardian is the eighth company created by The Foundry, a leading medical device incubator based in Menlo Park, Calif. Ardian’s investors include Morgenthaler Ventures, Advanced Technology Ventures, Split Rock Partners, Medtronic and Emergent Medical Partners. For more information, please visit www.ardian.com.

Mountain View, CA based Ardian Inc. has announced the results of a six month study which evaluated the company’s Symplicity Catheter System for treatment of chronic drug resistant hypertension. The study compared the outcomes of patients taking three or more antihypertensive drugs to those treated with the Symplicity. The results of the study, reported in the Lancet, demonstrated that a six month treatment with Ardian’s technology proved more effective than traditional medical treatment in patients with sustained grade 2 hypertension (baseline SBP of 160 mm Hg or more). The Symplicity System is a catheter-based low-power radiofrequency (RF) renal denervation device, thought to permanently treat hypertension by reducing or eliminating the sympathetic innervation of the renal arteries, hence “reducing both the pathologic central sympathetic drive to the kidney and the renal contribution to central sympathetic hyperactivity.”

More from the press release:

q4gwr Ardians Hypertension Treatment Outperforms Traditional Medical Treatment in Clinical Trial

The Symplicity HTN-2 trial was an international, multi-center, prospective, randomized, controlled study of the safety and effectiveness of renal denervation in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. One hundred-six patients were enrolled from 24 investigational sites. At baseline the randomized treatment and control patients had similar high blood pressures: 178/97 mmHg and 178/98 mmHg, respectively, despite both receiving an average daily regimen of five antihypertensive medications. After six months, the average blood pressure of the renal denervation group was reduced to 146/85 mmHg, compared to an average blood pressure of 179/98 mmHg for the control group.

The study also found that the therapy was safe, with no serious device or procedure-related events, no cardiovascular complications and no kidney-related complications.

Source : http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2810%2962039-9/abstract

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Flexible Nanogenerators to Power Implantable Microdevices

Flexible Nanogenerators to Power Implantable Microdevices

Flexible Nanogenerators to Power Implantable Microdevices

The KAIST and GIT team developed a power generation technology using bendable thin film nano-materials

IMAGE: Flexible thin film nanomaterials produce electricity.

Can a heart implanted micro robot operate permanently? Can cell phones and tiny robots implanted in the heart operate permanently without having their batteries charged?

It might sound like science fiction, but these things seem to be possible in the near future.

The team of Prof. Keon Jae Lee (KAIST, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering) and Prof. Zhong Lin Wang (Georgia Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering) has developed new forms of highly efficient, flexible nanogenerator technology using the freely bendable piezoelectric ceramic thin film nano-materials that can convert tiny movements of the human body (such as heart beats and blood flow) into electrical energy.

The piezoelectric effect refers to voltage generation when pressure or bending strength is applied to piezoelectric materials. The ceramics, containing a perovskite structure, have a high piezoelectric efficiency. Until now, it has been very difficult to use these ceramic materials to fabricate flexible electronic systems due to their brittle property.

The research team, however, has succeeded in developing a bio-eco-friendly ceramic thin film nanogenerator that is freely bendable without breakdown.

Nanogenerator technology, a power generating system without wires or batteries, combines nanotechnology with piezoelectrics that can be used not only in personal mobile electronics but also in bio-implantable sensors or as an energy source for micro robots. Energy sources in nature (wind, vibration, and sound) and biomechanical forces produced by the human body (heart beats, blood flow, and muscle contraction/relaxation) can infinitely produce nonpolluting energy.

Prof. Keon Jae Lee (KAIST) was involved in the first co-invention of “High Performance Flexible Single Crystal Electronics” during his PhD course at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This nanogenerator technology, based on the previous invention, utilized the similar protocol of transferring ceramic thin film nano-materials on flexible substrates and produced voltage generation between electrodes.

Prof. Zhong Lin Wang (Georgia Tech, inventor of the nanogenerator) said, “This technology can be used to turn on an LED by slightly modifying circuits and operate touchable flexible displays. In addition, thin film nano-materials (‘barium titanate’) of this research have the property of both high efficiency and lead-free bio compatibility, which can be used in future medical applications.”

The piezoelectric generation of perovskite BaTiO3 thin films on a flexible substrate has been applied to convert mechanical energy to electrical energy for the first time. Ferroelectric BaTiO3 thin films were deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering on a Pt/Ti/SiO2/(100) Si substrate and poled under an electric field of 100 kV/cm. The metal-insulator (BaTiO3)-metal-structured ribbons were successfully transferred onto a flexible substrate and connected by interdigitated electrodes. When periodically deformed by a bending stage, a flexible BaTiO3 nanogenerator can generate an output voltage of up to 1.0 V. The fabricated nanogenerator produced an output current density of 0.19 ?A/cm2 and a power density of 7 mW/cm3. The results show that a nanogenerator can be used to power flexible displays by means of mechanical agitations for future touchable display technologies.

More and more sensors and devices are being implanted into the human body, however powering them remains a tough problem in many cases. Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have developed a flexible nanogenerator that converts small movements of the human body into electricity. It uses freely bendable piezoelectric ceramic thin film nano-material, which generates voltages when pressure or bending forces are applied. Apart from medical applications, it might also be used to power personal mobile electronics or micro robots. Many different energy sources, such as wind, vibration and sound, but also heart beats, blood flow and muscle contraction, can be used with this technology. Here’s a short video demonstrating this technology in action.

Source : http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-11/tkai-nfo111010.php

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FDA Grants IDE Nod to Innovative High Blood Pressure Device

FDA Grants IDE Nod to Innovative High Blood Pressure Device

FDA Grants IDE Nod to Innovative High Blood Pressure Device

BOISE– 1/18/2012 – Zona Health, developer of non-invasive, non-drug treatments for hypertension, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conditionally approved an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) for a pivotal clinical trial to evaluate the Company’s patented isometric handgrip therapy technology (ZonaRx™) for use in the treatment of resistant hypertension (high blood pressure in the presence of two or more medications), an especially dangerous disease affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. FDA approval of the IDE makes Zona Health’s study the first pivotal trial of isometric handgrip therapy for hypertension treatment.

The investigatory team for the study includes JoAnn Lindenfeld, M.D., Director of the Cardiac Transplant Program at University Hospital in Aurora, Colorado, and a member of the FDA Devices Committee; Suzanne Oparil, M.D., Professor of Medicine and Director of the Vascular Biology and Hypertension Program in the Division of Cardiovascular Disease at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and Co-chair of The Eighth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 8); and Kenneth Kronhaus, M.D., Ph.D., Cardiologist, and American Heart Association Spokesman.

“We are very pleased with the IDE approval and look forward to commencing the pivotal study to provide longer term safety and efficacy data of our ZonaRx™ hypertension treatment technology in this set of resistant hypertensive patients,” said Steven Wood, President and CEO of Zona Health. “We believe this innovative treatment has the potential to provide patients with an effective way to control their blood pressure when other treatment options are insufficient.”

The pivotal trial is a double-blind, randomized, controlled study designed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of isometric handgrip therapy with the ZonaRx™ in patients who are taking two or more medications but cannot reach their blood pressure goals. The study will enroll approximately 200 patients in several medical centers across the U.S.

The ZonaRx™ is a medical device which enables patients to easily perform isometric handgrip therapy in the comfort of their homes. The device uses patented technology to accurately customize the therapy for each individual patient in order to trigger a specific physiological response that leads to lower blood pressure. The ZonaRx does not require a permanent implant or invasive surgery.

Clinical research shows that Zona Health’s isometric handgrip therapy may provide a significant reduction in blood pressure levels for the majority of hypertensive patients. Across several earlier studies, 135 out of 136 participants achieved significant blood pressure drops in eight weeks or less.

Hypertension is the leading attributable cause of death worldwide. It is a significant, escalating global healthcare problem affecting approximately 1.2 billion people and is associated with an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure, kidney disease and death. High blood pressure is estimated to have a direct cost to the global healthcare system of more than $500 billion annually. Although pharmaceutical therapy plays a primary role in hypertension management, drugs alone are sometimes not effective for all patients. As a result, despite lifestyle changes and the availability of modern antihypertensive agents, approximately 50 percent of patients with hypertension remain uncontrolled, and approximately 15-20 percent of those are resistant.

About Zona Health

Zona Health is a privately held medical device company headquartered in Boise, Idaho. The Company’s proprietary technology is designed for effective, non-drug and non-invasive treatment of hypertension. Zona Health currently manufactures and markets the Zona Plus™, a medical device for the improvement of overall cardiovascular health. Additional information can be found at www.zona.com.

The FDA has conditionally approved an investigational device exemption (IDE) for a pivotal clinical trial to evaluate a new patented isometric handgrip therapy technology. A product of Zona Health (Boise, ID), the ZonaRx device was developed for use in the treatment of resistant hypertension (high blood pressure that persists despite treatment by two or more medications). The IDE approval marks the first pivotal trial of isometric handgrip therapy for hypertension treatment.

Earlier clinical studies demonstrate that the isometric handgrip therapy could provide “a significant reduction in blood pressure levels for the majority of hypertensive patients,” according to Zona Health. According to earlier data, 135 out of 136 study participants achieved significant blood pressure drops in eight weeks or less.

From the announcement:

The pivotal trial is a double-blind, randomized, controlled study designed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of isometric handgrip therapy with the ZonaRx™ in patients who are taking two or more medications but cannot reach their blood pressure goals. The study will enroll approximately 200 patients in several medical centers across the U.S.

The ZonaRx™ is a medical device which enables patients to easily perform isometric handgrip therapy in the comfort of their homes. The device uses patented technology to accurately customize the therapy for each individual patient in order to trigger a specific physiological response that leads to lower blood pressure. The ZonaRx does not require a permanent implant or invasive surgery.

Source : http://search.mywebsearch.com/mywebsearch/GGmain.jhtml?st=dns&ptb=FBA283A0-B6EF-4178-9CD1-9C01FD5858EA&n=77edc4cb&ind=2012071115&id=XPxdm045YYin&ptnrS=XPxdm045YYin&searchfor=api-public.addthis.com

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Griffin AirStrap Med Keeps Your iPad Clean of Blood and Other Bodily Fluids

Griffin AirStrap Med Keeps Your iPad Clean of Blood and Other Bodily Fluids

Griffin AirStrap Med Keeps Your iPad Clean of Blood and Other Bodily Fluids

Nashville, TN – June 12, 2012 – Griffin Technology, one of the world’s foremost creators of innovations for everyday life, is excited to announce a new addition to their Business Solutions lineup: AirStrap Med, a sanitizable case for iPad designed for easy use by medical personnel while caring for patients.

Spyglass Consulting Group’s new report, “Point of Care Computing for Physicians 2012,” reveals that 80 percent of physicians surveyed believe that Apple’s iPad tablet will be a positive player in healthcare in the future, particularly as software developers optimize their clinical applications for use on the iPad. Spyglass conducted phone interviews with more than 100 doctors in acute and ambulatory care in the United States from July to October 2011.

“AirStrap Med is the lightest, most versatile case we’ve ever designed, and it allows full control of the iPad’s amazing Multi-Touch screen even while wearing latex or nitrile gloves,” said J. Curtis, Griffin’s Director of B2B Product Development. “We aim to help healthcare professionals focus on patient care while implementing the latest technology.”

Compatible with iPad 2 and the new 3rd generation iPad, AirStrap Med allows doctors and nurses to easily hold an iPad in one hand while they use it to view medical records, apps, x-rays and more. AirStrap Med was developed in collaboration with physicians and nurses to adapt the convenience of Griffin’s original AirStrap case to the demanding and specialized needs of the healthcare environment.

A combination of ABS and TPE plastics, AirStrap Med is constructed as a lightweight, two-piece frame with built-in screen shield that closes securely around the tablet, sealing it, front, back, sides, and touchscreen, from moisture and fluids. An adjustable shoulder strap allows users to carry the iPad with their hands free for other tasks. The case’s non-porous, non-slip surfaces are fully sanitizable with industry-standard cleaning and sterilization products. Both shoulder strap and hand strap are detachable for easy cleaning, and can be adjusted to accommodate right- and left-handed users.

The AirStrap Med is available now for $89.99 at store.griffintechnology.com/airstrap-med-case.

For more information about Griffin’s Business Solutions, visit www.griffintechnology.com/business.

About Griffin Technology

Founded on Paul Griffin’s kitchen table in 1992, Griffin Technology Inc., is today one of the world’s foremost creators of accessories for home, mobile, and personal technology. Unique products such as iTrip®, PowerMate®, iFM®, iMic® and Evolve® Wireless Speaker System have broken new ground in consumer electronics and created loyal fans the world over. Today, Griffin products are conceived, designed and developed in-house and continue to push the envelope of the industry they helped create. Learn more about Griffin’s entire range of ingenious designs at www.griffintechnology.com, www.facebook.com/griffintech and on Twitter, @griffintech.

Developed with input from physicians and nurses from across the U.S.

AirStrap Med brings the convenience and security of Griffin’s AirStrap case to the demanding environment of healthcare settings.

AirStrap Med is designed to make using iPad 2 and iPad (3rd gen.) in healthcare settings easier, safer and more comfortable. Using the wide, comfortable hand strap on the back of the case, it’s much easier to hold the iPad with with one hand during rounds, charting and other on-the-go activities.

The lightweight, two-piece polycarbonate and TPE frame snaps securely around your iPad, sealing it against moisture and fluid intrusion on all sides. Non-slip surfaces give a positive grip whether the user is bare-handed or wearing gloves. AirStrap Med covers your iPad’s Multi-Touch display by a touch-through screen protector shield that resists fingerprints and scratches. iPad’s Home button and volume controls remain accessible.

Smooth non-porous surfaces are fully sanitizable with industry-standard cleaning and sterilization products.

A molded-in clip secures your stylus when not in use. Included detachable hand and shoulder straps securely clip onto reinforced points on the frame but can be quickly removed for cleaning.

Griffin has released the AirStrap Med, an iPad case especially for the healthcare environment. The AirStrap Med was developed in collaboration with physicians and nurses, adapting Griffin’s existing AirStrap case to the specialized needs of hospital environments.

The case is fully sanitizable and the iPad can be controlled, if needed, one-handed while wearing latex or nitrile gloves.

A combination of ABS and TPE plastics, AirStrap Med is constructed as a lightweight, two-piece frame with built-in screen shield that closes securely around the tablet, sealing it, front, back, sides, and touchscreen, from moisture and fluids. An adjustable shoulder strap allows users to carry the iPad with their hands free for other tasks. The case’s non-porous, non-slip surfaces are fully sanitizable with industry-standard cleaning and sterilization products. Both shoulder strap and hand strap are detachable for easy cleaning, and can be adjusted to accommodate right- and left-handed users.

On the back, the AirStrap Med features a molded-in clip that secures a stylus. It is compatible with the iPad 2 and the new 3rd generation iPad. The Airstrip Med is available from Griffin for $89.99.

Source : http://www.griffintechnology.com/press/release/griffin-announces-availability-airstrap-med-case-ipad-designed-input-medical-professio

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Omron launches continuous Strapless Heart Rate Monitor

Omron launches continuous Strapless Heart Rate Monitor

Today Omron Healthcare, Inc., a leader in personal wellness products, launched its first-ever, continuous Strapless Heart Rate Monitor (HR-500U). Exercise enthusiasts can now take their workout to the next level comfortably without an annoying chest strap. Easy to use, the monitor is worn on the wrist and provides accurate, continuous monitoring.

“I recommend documenting your goals and tracking your progress weekly to get a better picture of your activity over time.”

“Our new Strapless Heart Rate Monitor can help you work out smarter. Our monitor alerts you when you are in the right zone to ensure an optimal workout. Walking 10,000 steps a day is recommended, but you can also achieve the same benefits walking 5,000 steps at a higher exercise level,” said Ranndy Kellogg, vice president marketing and product development at Omron. “It’s a simple solution to fit your everyday lifestyle and when you connect at our Website, your health data becomes visible, helping you achieve your goals of improved fitness and overall health.”

Strapless, Continuous Monitoring

Designed for use during a workout, the monitor measures heart rate via an optic sensor on the wrist and an accelerometer to determine pace, distance, and calories burned. As blood flow changes from beat to beat, the optic sensor measures the blood’s movement in and out of the capillaries and can determine the heart rate on a continuous basis.

Users can simply glance at the monitor on their wrist to check their heart rate without interrupting their workout. A color LCD light helps determine which zone they are in and alerts if they are in a zone too high or too low. Readings from their last workout are accessible on the monitor and 10 hours of data are stored on the unit which can be transferred to www.omronfitness.com.

Track Goals, Share Victories

By connecting the Strapless Heart Rate Monitor via USB cable at www.omronfitness.com, users can transfer data and track progress over time and share achievements via email, Facebook and Twitter with friends, family or a healthcare professional from their own personal dashboard. Mac and PC compatible, the dashboard is accessible on a personal computer or laptop and viewable on Smartphones and tablets.

“Tracking health goals such as heart rate to help improve your fitness is a key to getting results and therefore staying motivated,” said Oprah’s personal trainer Bob Greene. “I recommend documenting your goals and tracking your progress weekly to get a better picture of your activity over time.” Omron makes it easy to stay accountable with their new connected products and Website www.omronfitness.com where you can share victories and friends can keep you motivated.

Name It & Win!

It’s all in the wrist and now Omron is looking for a name for its new Strapless Heart Rate Monitor. Omron will be calling on all fans from November 15 to December 9, 2012 to help name its newest heart rate monitor. Five finalists will be announced January 8, 2013 by Bob Greene at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nev. Winners will receive Omron’s new Strapless Heart Rate monitor and a $250 gift card for fitness accessories. Entries can by submitted by visiting www.facebook.com/OmronFitness and clicking on the “It’s All in the Wrist” giveaway tab.

Source : http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121115/Omron-launches-continuous-Strapless-Heart-Rate-Monitor.aspx

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