Archive for ‘Bone Fractures’

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Bone Allograft Market Segmentation and Analysis by Recent Trends, Development and Growth by Regions to 2021

Bone Allograft Market Segmentation and Analysis by Recent Trends, Development and Growth by Regions to 2021

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The Bone Allograft market provides detailed market segment level data on the international market. The Bone Allograft market report addresses forecast and growth patterns by company, regions and type or application from 2016 to 2021.

In this introductory section, the Bone Allograft market research report incorporates analysis of definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. Besides this, the report also consists of development trends, competitive landscape analysis, and key regions development status.

Browse Detailed TOC, Tables, Figures, Charts and Companies Mentioned in Bone Allograft Market Research Report@ http://www.360marketupdates.com/10408610

The report starts with a basic Bone Allograft market overview. It also acts as a vital tool to industries active across the value chain and for new entrants by enabling them to take advantage of the opportunities and develop business strategies.

Bone Allograft Market Key Players Analysis:

  • RTI Surgical
  • Osteogenics Biomedical
  • Institut Straumann AG
  • Synthes
  • Exactech
  • Zimmer Dental

Continued……

Bone Allograft market report helps the companies to better understand the market trends and to grasp opportunities and articulate critical business strategies. Also includes company profiles of market key players contact information, gross capacity, product details of each firm, price, and cost are covered.

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Major Applications for Bone Allograft Market:

  • Hospital
  • Medical Center

Major Classifications for Bone Allograft Market:

  • Adult
  • Children

This section of the market research report includes analysis of major raw materials suppliers, manufacturing equipment suppliers, major players of the Bone Allograft industry, key consumers, and supply chain relationship. The contact information is also provided along with this analysis.

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Several important areas are covered in this Bone Allograft market research report. Some key points among them: –

  • Global Bone Allograft Market Competition by Manufacturers
  • Global Bone Allograft Production, Revenue (Value) by Region (2011-2016)
  • Global Bone Allograft Supply (Production), Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016)
  • Global Bone Allograft Production, Revenue (Value), Price Trend by Type
  • Global Bone Allograft Market Analysis by Application
  • Global Bone Allograft Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis
  • Bone Allograft Manufacturing Cost Analysis
  • Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers
  • Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders
  • Market Effect Factors Analysis
  • Global Bone Allograft Market Forecast (2016-2021)

Along with this, analysis of depreciation cost, manufacturing cost structure, manufacturing process is also carried out. Price, cost, and gross analysis of the Bone Allograft market is also included in this section.

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The Bone Allograft market research report shed light on Foremost Regions:

  • North America
  • Europe
  • China
  • Japan
  • Southeast Asia
  • India

The Bone Allograft industry research report is a valuable source of guidance and direction. It is helpful for established businesses, new entrants in the market as well as individuals interested in the market. The Bone Allograft market report provides important statistics on the existing state of the said market.

No. of Report pages: 103

Price of Report: $2900 (Single User Licence)

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Pain Management Devices Market : Asia Pacific to Present Promising Opportunities in Pain Management Devices

Pain Management Devices Market : Asia Pacific to Present Promising Opportunities in Pain Management Devices

Pain-Management-Devices

 

The dynamic nature of the global market for pain management devices has set in motion strong competition between players. The top three participants, namely Medtronic Plc, St. Jude Medical Inc., and Boston Scientific Corp. collectively accounted for more than 72% of the overall market in 2014, reports Transparency Market Research (TMR) in a new study.

These companies boast of superior distribution channels and ample supply capabilities that ensure easy availability of their products, validating their lead in this market. However, a large number of medical device manufacturers are looking to venture into the pain management sector, which is projected to intensify the competition and change the current dynamics in the coming years.

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Growing Prevalence of Chronic Medical Conditions Boosts Demand for Pain Management Devices

The growing prevalence of chronic medical conditions, such as diabetes, cancer, obesity, osteo and rheumatoid arthritis, and spinal problems, have increased the incidence of chronic pain in individuals. Various studies suggest more than 20% of the adult population suffers from chronic pain and nearly 10% of the global population gets diagnosed with chronic pain every year.

Around half of the cancer patients, globally, experience severe pain at the time of diagnosis and almost 75% complain of a gradual increase in pain as the disease progresses. Chronic pain has also been experienced after the occurrence of the primary disease in nearly 70% of patients suffering from spinal cord injuries, 28% of multiple sclerosis patients, and 8% of stroke patients. These factors result in a rising need for pain management and, thereby, pain management devices across the world.

The global geriatric population, which requires continuous medical intervention and care, represents a significant portion of patients with chronic illnesses. The increase in this population is also fueling the demand for pain management devices worldwide considerably. However, the increasing concerns regarding the risk associated with the implantation of pain management devices are holding people back from adopting them, limiting their growth to some extent.

Moving forward, the unmet medical needs, together with the escalating disposable income of people in emerging economies, are likely to provide lucrative opportunities to pain management device manufacturers in the coming years.

Demand for Pain Management Devices to Register Rapid Rise in Asia Pacific

According to TMR, the global opportunity in pain management devices is projected to register a healthy rise from US$3.2 bn in 2014 to US$6.3 bn by 2023, expanding at a CAGR of 7.60% during the period from 2015 to 2023. Currently, neurostimulation devices have emerged as the most demanded pain management devices across the world.

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North America led the demand for pain management devices in 2014 with a share of nearly 50%. Europe closely followed North America with a share of around 22%. Asia Pacific, however, is expected to report the fastest growth at a CAGR of 10.0% over the forecast period. These pain management devices have found maximum application in neuropathic pain and musculoskeletal pain.

 

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Hip prosthesis lasts for over 20 yearsHip prosthesis lasts for over 20 years

Hip prosthesis lasts for over 20 years

The Zweymüller prosthesis, developed at the end of the 1970s, was one of the first to be anchored in the bone without using bone cement to fix it in place. The prosthesis’s special geometry and surface guarantee its stable anchoring and natural integration into the bone. Its hallmark feature is the roughened surface of the stem, which provides a place for the new bone tissue to grow onto.

In the past, the endoprosthesis has been made from ultra-lightweight titanium, has been implanted millions of times over, and has even been used in minimally invasive procedures with an incision in the skin measuring around ten centimetres. Nowadays, it is used in combination with a ball and socket made from ceramic, which produces less wear. In 67 per cent of the 200 test subjects investigated, the durability of the ball and socket, i.e. the second outcome of the study, which has now been published in the highly respected journal “The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery”, is still intact after 20 years.

Around 300 total hip replacements are carried out at the University Department of Orthopaedics at the MedUni Vienna / Vienna General Hospital every year, half of them involving Zweymüller prostheses. Patients are even able to carry out sports without impacting on the durability of the prosthesis or causing it to loosen any sooner. Patients are becoming younger and younger – particularly in light of the prosthesis’s excellent quality. In the past, says Windhager, the average age of patients receiving hip replacements was significantly higher than 65 years, but nowadays it continues to fall below this.

Research into even better integration of prostheses

The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the MedUni Vienna is also carrying out research into the development of new, even better prostheses using the so-called radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Says Windhager: “The movement of the implant relative to the bone is measured in three dimensions. We are able, as it were, to watch the implant while it moves. We achieve accuracies of up to 0.1 millimetres.” Within the first two years after the operation, this means that it is possible to obtain an early diagnosis of how the implant is integrating into the bone and of its durability. RSA also allows new materials that are used for the new types of prosthesis – including of the knee, foot or spine – to be compared with each other.

“RSA is the ideal tool for the development of new products in orthopaedic surgery. Our aim is to further improve the integration of the implant into the bone. The biology is especially important here; we’re able to see what’s happening around the prosthesis,” says the Head of Department.

Source : http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121203/Hip-prosthesis-lasts-for-over-20-years.aspx

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New approach could help orthopaedic surgeons better deal with battlefield injuries

New approach could help orthopaedic surgeons better deal with battlefield injuries

Bones are resilient and heal well after most fractures. But in cases of traumatic injury, in which big pieces of bone are missing, healing is much more difficult, if not impossible. These so-called “large segmental defects” are a major clinical problem, and orthopaedic surgeons struggle to treat them, especially among the military in places like Afghanistan.

Now research led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) offers surgeons a new approach. Described on-line in today’s issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, the results confirm that the bone healing process of large segmental defects is exquisitely sensitive to its mechanical environment and suggests that “reverse dynamization,” a straightforward and inexpensive process, could help speed healing of these traumatic injuries.

“Bones are greatly influenced by their mechanical environment, which is why casts, rods, plates and screws are typically used to heal fractures – with a great deal of success,” explains senior author Christopher Evans PhD, Director of the Center for Advanced Orthopaedic Studies at BIDMC. “But until now, no one has examined the relevance of the mechanical environment to the healing of large segmental bone defects.”

According to the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), these injuries are one of the most demanding surgical challenges faced by orthopaedic trauma surgeons. Often as large as 20 centimeters in length, large segmental defects can be complicated by regional soft-tissue loss, reduced vascularity, regional scarring and infection. The AAOS notes that an increased number of missions being conducted on foot in Afghanistan has led to an increase in this type of combat blast injury.

Changing levels of stiffness during bone healing is known as “dynamization.” During standard dynamization, bone is first held rigidly in place by a mechanical intervention, or fixation device. Once healing has begun, the stiff rigidity is loosened to allow movement. “An ‘external fixator’ is placed on the outside of the skin and usually has a ‘cross-bar’ that determines the level of rigidity and can be adjusted to allow more or less motion,” explains Evans, who is also the Maurice Edmond Mueller Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Harvard Medical School. Evans and his colleagues thought that how firmly or loosely injured bone is held together by mechanical interventions -casts, rods, plates and screws – could impact these large segmental bone defects, just as it does for more minor fractures — but with one big difference. The scientists changed stiffness levels in the opposite order — hence, “reverse dynamization.”

“Our laboratory has a lot of experience with a rat model of segmental defect healing, and we noticed that during the healing process, the defect first fills with cartilage, and then the cartilage turns to bone,” says Evans. Technically known as “endochondral ossification” this process is well documented to occur in fracture healing. ‘We knew from other previous work that the early formation of cartilage is helped when mechanical fixation is loose. We also knew that a subsequent increase in fixator stiffness would provide the rigidity needed for the ingrowth of blood vessels and other aspects of healing.” Evans and his coauthors hypothesized that a period of loose “fixation” followed by a period of stiffened “fixation” would accelerate healing of large segmental defects. “If bones are allowed to move slightly, cartilage will form in the defect,” he adds. “If the area is then held rigidly in place, the new cartilage will then turn to bone.”

The team constructed external fixators capable of providing varying degrees of stiffness during the healing process. By implanting a growth factor called bone morphogenetic protein-2 on a collagen sponge, the scientists initiated healing of segmental defects in the femurs of 60 rats. Groups of the animals were then allowed to heal with either low-, medium-, or high-stiffness fixators. Healing also took place under conditions of reverse dynamization, in which the stiffness levels were changed from low to high after a period of two weeks. After eight weeks, the researchers assessed healing using various measures including radiographs, microscopic analyses, and mechanical tests.

The investigators found that when they looked only at unchanging stiffness, the low-stiffness fixator produced the best healing; however, by comparison, the reverse dynamization provided considerable improvement, leading to a marked acceleration in the healing process by all tests. Also, notes Evans, the bone mineral content and bone area of the defects healed by reverse dynamization were closer to normal, and the healed bone had greater mechanical strength.

“Our study confirms the exquisite sensitivity of bone healing to its mechanical environment,” he notes. The next step, says Evans, will be to see if this therapy works in large animals, while also gathering more information about the biological mechanisms that are at play. But, he adds, moving these findings into a clinical setting should be relatively straightforward. “The nice thing about this approach is that it’s simple and could be rapidly translated to human use if our proposed large-animal studies are successful. The regulatory hurdles should be minor.” Furthermore, he adds, reverse dynamization might also be applicable to other situations for which bone healing is problematic. “Sometimes in smokers or individuals with diabetes, fractures heal poorly,” he notes, adding that the same can be true when an infection is present.

Reverse dynamization is also an attractive option in terms of cost. “Often, strategies devised in the lab to solve clinical problems are far too complex and expensive to be translated into meaningful clinical use,” notes study coauthor Mark Vrahas, MD, Chief of the Harvard Orthopaedic Trauma Service. “But if the promise of this strategy holds out, it will be inexpensive enough to be used even in developing countries, where the burden of severe injuries are particularly high.”

source : http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121122/New-approach-could-help-orthopaedic-surgeons-better-deal-with-battlefield-injuries.aspx

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Study finds several osteoporosis risk factors among post-menopausal women on HRT

Study finds several osteoporosis risk factors among post-menopausal women on HRT

A preliminary study of 127 post-menopausal women on hormone replacement therapy in Portugal suggests that there are several risk factors associated with osteoporosis and bone fracture these include age, low bone mineral density, a sedentary lifestyle, coffee consumption and ovariectomy. Details are reported later this month in the International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics.

Osteoporosis is a disease of the skeleton commonly associated with low bone mass and is predominant in elderly, post-menopausal women. Elza Fonseca of the Polytechnic Institute of Bragança and colleagues there and at the Medical Imaging Centre in Porto, point out that osteoporosis was common in the group of Portuguese women studied. They discuss data from different geographic regions concerning this public health problem.

The team hoped to identify common factors and so underpin knowledge on this potentially debilitating and critical bone disease. The clinical relevance is that those with the condition are highly susceptible to bone fractures, which can lead to pain, hospitalisation and disablement, particularly in the case of hip, spine and wrist fracture. Indeed, fractures linked to osteoporosis are unfortunately often linked to patient death.

Bone mass density as determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has been used frequently to determine whether a particular patient is at increased risk of fracture, it also provides a quantitative marker for osteoporosis, which is defined as having BMD 2.5 standard deviations below average. Osteopenia, a precursor condition to osteoporosis, is marked by a BMD 1.0 to 2.5 below average.

The researchers point out that, controversy exists among experts regarding the value of BMD as a diagnostic criterion for osteoporosis. They explain that there is good evidence to support the cost-effectiveness and efficacy of early prescription of preventive drugs, but it is not clear at which point below the threshold this should be. Their new study on lifestyle and other risk factors should couple neatly with such discussions and allow more informed decisions to be made regarding the use of drugs in patients with signs of osteopenia who may, or may not, go on to develop osteoporosis.

Source : http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121114/Study-finds-several-osteoporosis-risk-factors-among-post-menopausal-women-on-HRT.aspx

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Positive results from BioCardia’s Helical Infusion System Phase 1/2 trial on ischemic cardiomyopathy

Positive results from BioCardia’s Helical Infusion System Phase 1/2 trial on ischemic cardiomyopathy

BioCardia, Inc., focused on regenerative biologic therapies for cardiovascular disease, today announced positive results from a Phase 1/2 heart failure trial using the Company’s Helical Infusion System, comprising the Helical Infusion System Catheter™ and Morph® Vascular Access Catheter, to deliver allogeneic, or “off-the-shelf,” and autologous, or from the treated patient, mesenchymal (adult) stem cells (MSCs) via transendocardial injection. According to the results, both the allogeneic and autologous MSCs were safe and well-tolerated at all doses and demonstrated similarly positive effects on cardiac structure and function, patient functional capacity and quality of life. Results from the POSEIDON (Percutaneous Stem Cell Injection Delivery Effects on Neomyogenesis) study were reported in a late breaker presentation titled, “Randomized Comparison of Allogeneic vs Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy,” at the American Heart Association’s 2012 Scientific Sessions and have been published in an article in the November 6 edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The POSEIDON study was cosponsored by the NIH Specialized Center for Cell Therapy, the University of Miami, and BioCardia.

Joshua Hare, M.D., Director of the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute (ISCI) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and the POSEIDON study lead principal investigator, stated, “The combination of Allogenic MSCs with the BioCardia Helix catheter has enormous potential as a combination product for treating heart failure. The strong safety results and ease of the catheter delivery procedure in skilled hands, coupled with the potential for the use of allogeneic stem cells, suggest that this procedure may one day be as easy to perform as coronary angioplasty.”

Peter Altman, Ph.D., President and CEO of BioCardia, commented, “The Helical Infusion System is intended to be the safest and easiest to use catheter for multiple clinical applications in cell- and gene-based therapy. We believe its performance and our track record of experience are second to none, and we are very optimistic about the delivery mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of ischemic heart failure. Trial results such as POSEIDON require the talent and hard work of a dedicated team of experts, and we have been privileged to work with the clinical teams at the University of Miami and Johns Hopkins University.”

Interventional cardiologist co-authors who performed the procedures in the study included Alan W. Heldman, M.D., and Juan Pablo Zambrano, M.D., at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and Jeffrey A Brinker, M.D., and Peter VanDoren Johnston, M.D., at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

The Phase 1/2 POSEIDON study enrolled 31 patients with chronic ischemic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). Patients were randomized to receive one of three different dose levels (20, 100, or 200 million cells) of either allogeneic MSCs or autologous MSCs. The stem cells were delivered to 10 LV sites in the myocardium by BioCardia’s transendocardial stem cell injection (TESI) during retrograde left heart catheterization using BioCardia’s Helical Infusion Catheter. The two catheter system fixates to the heart wall via a corkscrew needle, allowing for stable and controlled delivery of biologic therapies to the heart.

Following BioCardia’s TESI, patients were hospitalized for a minimum of four days and were seen two weeks post-catheterization. Thereafter, safety and efficacy assessments using cardiac imaging studies, exercise peak VO2, a 6-minute walk test, New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure (MLHF) questionnaire were performed on a monthly basis for six months and then again at 12 months. After 13 months, all patients received follow-up CT scans of the heart, chest, abdomen and pelvis.

The primary objective of the study was to demonstrate the safety of allogeneic MSCs administered by BioCardia’s TESI, determined by the incidence of any treatment-emergent serious adverse events (TE-SAEs) one month after stem cell injection. Data showed that within 30 days, one patient in each cohort was hospitalized for heart failure, a TE-SAE rate of 6.7%, substantially less than the pre-specified stopping rate of 25%. The secondary objectives were to compare the long-term safety of allogeneic MSCs to autologous MSCs and to demonstrate the efficacy of allogeneic MSCs and autologous MSCs administered by TESI in these patients. The one-year incidence of serious adverse events was not different between cell types, except for fewer ventricular arrhythmias in allogeneic recipients. Relative to baseline, allogeneic and autologous MSC therapy similarly improved the 6-minute walk and the MLHF questionnaire score, but not the exercise VO2 max. Finally, MSCs reduced infarct size (33.2%; P<0.0001), left ventricular (LV) volumes and sphericity index similarly in allogeneic and autologous groups. Importantly, allogeneic MSCs did not stimulate significant donor-specific alloimmune reactions.

A parallel Phase 1/2 study – the Transendocardial Autologous Cells in Heart Failure Trial (TAC-HFT) – also enabled by the BioCardia Helical Infusion System. The trial, co-sponsored by the University of Miami, is comparing autologous (bone marrow or mesenchymal) cell delivery to placebo in up to 68 cardiomyopathy patients randomized under a protocol similar to that of the POSEIDON trial. Early results in a first cohort of patients (N=8) were reported in 2011 to show that the autologous cells effected remodeling of LV shape and restoration of normal LV proportions.

Source : http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121107/Positive-results-from-BioCardias-Helical-Infusion-System-Phase-12-trial-on-ischemic-cardiomyopathy.aspx

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Two research groups present data on Pressure BioSciences’ PCT Platform at HUPO 2012

Two research groups present data on Pressure BioSciences’ PCT Platform at HUPO 2012

Pressure BioSciences, Inc. (OTCQB: PBIO) (“PBI” or the “Company”) today announced that scientists from two separate research groups presented data at the recent HUPO 11th Annual World Congress (Boston, MA) indicating that the incorporation of the Company’s Pressure Cycling Technology (“PCT”) Platform into their sample preparation processes resulted in a marked improvement in the quality and/or efficiency of test results. These studies were presented by scientists from the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research of the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) and from Janssen Research and Development (“Janssen”).

Dr. Michail Alterman and colleagues from the FDA presented on the “Global Proteomic Architecture of Culture-Expanded Human Bone Marrow Multipotent Stromal Cells (MSCs) and the Proteomic Basis of Heterogeneity”. MSCs are believed to offer huge potential for cell-based therapies for a wide variety of diseases. Currently, MSC studies are primarily focused on highly abundant proteins, which are generally unable to reveal important cellular events. The authors presented on the use of a highly improved approach to sample preparation and protein identification. This approach allowed them to better identify and analyze events likely to control the biology of the MSCs. Such information could be essential in the design and development of new, life-saving cell-based therapies. The authors reported that PCT was an important part of their improved sample preparation approach.

Scientists from Janssen Research & Development (a Johnson & Johnson Company) presented on the “Evaluation of Pressure-Assisted Enzymatic Digestion for the Optimal Digestion of Monoclonal Antibodies”. Monoclonal antibodies are widely used in scientific research, in diagnostics, and in therapeutics. However, it is essential that monoclonal antibodies be thoroughly identified and characterized before use. This process most often requires the use of an enzyme to completely digest the monoclonal antibody into its basic building blocks. The digestion process can be time-consuming, requiring as long as 24 hours to complete. The authors reported that “pressure-assisted enzymatic digestion” (e.g., PCT) was very effective in significantly reducing the total time required to digest monoclonal proteins and to expedite their complete characterization.

Dr. Nate Lawrence, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for PBI, commented: “We are very pleased that two highly respected scientific teams have shown that the incorporation of the PCT Platform in their sample preparation workflow resulted in significant advantages, including savings in analysis time and improvements in test and result quality. Cell-based therapies are believed to offer enormous potential for improving human healthcare and the quality of life. The monoclonal antibody market is believed to be in the tens of billions of dollars. Consequently, we believe that the results presented by FDA and Janssen scientists at HUPO 2012 bode well for an increased demand of our PCT Platform in 2013 and beyond.”

Source :http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121103/Two-research-groups-present-data-on-Pressure-BioSciences-PCT-Platform-at-HUPO-2012.aspx

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Dawn of the Ergonaut: GM and NASA Develop Robotic Gloves for Human Use

Dawn of the Ergonaut: GM and NASA Develop Robotic Gloves for Human Use

Dawn of the Ergonaut: GM and NASA Develop Robotic Gloves for Human Use

HOUSTON – General Motors and NASA are jointly developing a robotic glove that auto workers and astronauts can wear to help do their respective jobs better while potentially reducing the risk of repetitive stress injuries.

The Human Grasp Assist device, known internally in both organizations as the K-glove or Robo-Glove, resulted from GM and NASA’s Robonaut 2 (R2) project, which launched the first human-like robot into space in 2011. R2 is a permanent resident of the International Space Station.

When engineers, researchers and scientists from GM and NASA began collaborating on R2 in 2007, one of the design requirements was for the robot to operate tools designed for humans, alongside astronauts in outer space and factory workers on Earth. The team achieved an unprecedented level of hand dexterity on R2 by using leading-edge sensors, actuators and tendons comparable to the nerves, muscles and tendons in a human hand.

Research shows that continuously gripping a tool can cause fatigue in hand muscles within a few minutes. Initial testing of the Robo-Glove indicates the wearer can hold a grip longer and more comfortably.

“When fully developed, the Robo-Glove has the potential to reduce the amount of force that an auto worker would need to exert when operating a tool for an extended time or with repetitive motions,” said Dana Komin, GM’s manufacturing engineering director, Global Automation Strategy and Execution. “In so doing, it is expected to reduce the risk of repetitive stress injury.”

For example, an astronaut working in a pressurized suit outside the space station or an assembly operator in a factory might need to use 15-20 pounds of force to hold a tool during an operation but with the robotic glove only five-to-10 pounds of force might need to be applied.

“The prototype glove offers my space suit team a promising opportunity to explore new ideas, and challenges our traditional thinking of what extravehicular activity hand dexterity could be,” said Trish Petete, division chief, Crew and Thermal Systems Division, NASA Johnson Space Center.

Inspired by the finger actuation system of R2, actuators are embedded into the upper portion of the glove to provide grasping support to human fingers. The pressure sensors, similar to the sensors that give R2 its sense of touch are incorporated into the fingertips of the glove to detect when the user is grasping a tool. When the user grasps the tool, the synthetic tendons automatically retract, pulling the fingers into a gripping position and holding them there until the sensor is released.

GM and NASA have submitted 46 patent applications for R2, including 21 for R2’s hand and four for the Robo-Glove alone.

The first prototype of the glove was completed in March 2011 with a second generation arriving three months later. The fabric for the glove was produced by Oceaneering Space Systems, the same company that provided R2’s “skin.”

The current prototypes weigh about two pounds and include the control electronics, actuators and a small display for programming and diagnostics. An off-the-shelf lithium-ion power-tool battery with a belt-clip is used to power the system. A third-generation prototype that will use repackaged components to reduce the size and weight of the system is nearing completion.

“We are continuously looking for ways to improve safety and productivity on the shop floor,” Komin said. “Our goal is to bring this technology to the shop floor in the near future.”

NASA and GM have a long, rich history of partnering on key technologies, starting in the 1960s with the development of the navigation systems for the Apollo missions. GM also played a vital role in the development of the Lunar Rover Vehicle, the first vehicle used on the moon.

About NASA Johnson Space Center

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is the agency of the United States government that is responsible for the nation’s civilian space program and for aeronautics and aerospace research. Since February 2006, NASA’s mission statement has been to “pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery and aeronautics research.” The Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center is the NASA’s center for human spaceflight training, research and flight control in Houston, Texas, USA. Johnson Space Center is home to the United States astronaut corps and is responsible for training astronauts from both the U.S. and its international partners.

General Motors and NASA have been collaborating to develop a robotic glove to reduce the risk of repetitive strain in auto-motive workers and astronauts. The device, known as the K-glove, had its origins in another partnership between the two organizations, the Robonaut 2 project which we have covered previously on Medgadget.

During the Robonaut 2 project, the engineering team achieved a significant degree of dexterity and grasping functionality in the robot’s hand using state of the art sensors and actuators. The K-glove is an adaption of these technologies to augment human grasping so that fatigue and repetitive strain injury arising from prolonged use of power tools may be avoided.

From the press release:

Inspired by the finger actuation system of R2, actuators are embedded into the upper portion of the glove to provide grasping support to human fingers. The pressure sensors, similar to the sensors that give R2 its sense of touch are incorporated into the fingertips of the glove to detect when the user is grasping a tool. When the user grasps the tool, the synthetic tendons automatically retract, pulling the fingers into a gripping position and holding them there until the sensor is released.

The video below provides a good overview of the current K-Glove prototype. Obviously in order to reduce fatigue and strain, it is essential that the K-glove weights as little as possible. The current prototypes weigh about two pounds however a third-generation prototype is currently being developed which will reduce the size and weight of the overall system.

Source : http://www.gm.com/content/gmcom/home/article.content_pages_news_us_en_2012_mar_0313_roboglove.gm.html

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Investigational Lou Gehrig’s Disease Treatment Taps Bone-Marrow-Derived Stem Cells

Investigational Lou Gehrig’s Disease Treatment Taps Bone-Marrow-Derived Stem Cells

Investigational Lou Gehrig’s Disease Treatment Taps Bone-Marrow-Derived Stem Cells

BrainStorm (OTC.QB:BCLI) is a biotechnology company developing innovative, autologous stem cell therapies for highly debilitating neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease), Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Parkinson’s Disease (PD).

At BrainStorm we believe that NurOwn™, our proprietary, first-of-its-kind technology for the propagation and differentiation of autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) into NeuroTrophic Factor (NTF)-secreting cells and their transplantation at or near the site of damage, offers the hope of conquering neurodegenerative diseases.

Newswise — In the quest to find treatments for certain neurological diseases, BrainStorm is fast distinguishing itself as a leader in the field of regenerative medicine using stem cells through its unique platform called NurOwn. The Company can process human mesenchymal stem cells, which are present in bone marrow and are capable of self-renewal as well as differentiation into many other tissues. What makes BrainStorm technology platform very attractive to Big Pharma partnering is the autologous nature of the bone marrow-derived stem cells. This will in turn drastically reduce the expected translation time to market. The value of a treatment for ALS in the U.S. and EU is estimated to be $4Billion. The potential applications for the NurOwn platform to treat disease is fast becoming a reality. In short, BrainStorm is leveraging a patients own cells to heal itself of disease.

BrainStorm updated stakeholders recently with a review of the trial six months post transplantation. The Phase I/II clinical trial for ALS is being conducted at the prestigious Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem by renowned Professor Dimitrios Karussis, M.D., Ph.D. and a distinguished scientific team in its own right from BrainStorm headed by Professor Eldad Melamed. Patients have been transplanted with stem cells derived from their own bone marrow and treated with BrainStorm’s NurOwn stem cell technology. The trial will include a total of 24 patients, 12 in an advanced stage of the disease and 12 in an early stage.

The staff at Stem Cell Media and www.InvestorStemCell.com has initiated broad investor awareness coverage after Dr. Dimitrios Karussis announced early indications of efficacy last week. Dr. Karussis said, There have been no significant side effects in the initial patients we have treated with BrainStorms NurOwn technology. In addition, even though we are conducting a safety trial, the early clinical follow up of the patients treated with the stem cells shows indications of beneficial clinical effects, such as an improvement in breathing and swallowing ability as well as in muscular power. I am very excited about the safety results, as well as these indications of efficacy, we are seeing. This may represent the biggest hope in this field of degenerative diseases, like ALS.

Sai Rosen, Director of Operations for iCELL, commented, “With all the doom and gloom as of late in the world, we see men and women committed to easing the suffering of millions through regenerative medicine using stem cells. Bravo to BrainStorm tireless efforts to find treatments for unmet medical needs!”

BrainStorms ALS trial is coming to the United States sometime in 2012. After receiving Orphan Drug Designation for its NurOwn cell therapy for ALS in the US, BrainStorm is planning to carry out its Phase II clinical trials in the US. To that end, BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics is currently working with the Northeast ALS consortium to design a phase II trial in the United States and has signed a Memorandum of Understating with the Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Massachusetts Medical School in anticipation of applying for FDA approval to begin ALS human clinical trials in the United States in the course of 2012. The University of Massachusetts Medical School team will be led by Professor Robert H. Brown, MD, DPHIL., and Chair of the Neurological Department at University of Massachusetts Medical School. Professor Brown is a leading expert in neuromuscular genetics and is world renowned for his expertise in ALS. Professor Merit Cudkowitz will lead the Massachusetts General Hospital team.

About BrainStorm (OTC.BB:BCLI) is a leading developer of stem cell technologies to provide treatments for currently incurable neurodegenerative diseases. The Company is focused on developing NTF cells from the patient’s own bone marrow in order to treat, Parkinson, ALS, and Spinal Cord Injury

InvestorStemCell.com is dedicated to bringing investors and stakeholders together in thoughtful discussion to educate and publicize the incredible advancements in the regenerative medicine sector.

DO NOT BASE ANY INVESTMENT DECISION UPON ANY MATERIALS FOUND ON THIS REPORT OR WEBSITE. We are not registered as a securities broker-dealer or an investment adviser either with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) or with any state securities regulatory authority. We are neither licensed nor qualified to provide investment advice.

The NurOwn platform from BrainStorm (New York City) makes use of human mesenchymal stem cells, which are derived from a patient’s own bone marrow, to treat neurological diseases. The cells have the capacity for self-renewal and differentiation into various tissues.

The company is investigating the use of the platform to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; Lou Gehrig’s disease) and has announced the results of Phase I/II clinical trial that is being conducted at Hadassah Medical Center (Jerusalem). The trial includes a total of 24 patients, 12 of which suffer from an advanced stage of the disease. The remainder have been diagnosed with early-stage ALS.

According to Dimitrios Karussis, MD, PhD, who is overseeing the clinical trial, the treatment has been promising with no significant side effects. In a press release, Dr. Karussis explains that “the early clinical follow up of the patients treated with the stem cells shows indications of beneficial clinical effects, such as an improvement in breathing and swallowing ability as well as in muscular power.”

The company is planning on performing a clinical trial in the United States in 2012.

Source : http://newswise.com/articles/brainstorm-cell-therapeutics-otcbb-bcli-has-potentially-developed-a-treatment-for-als?ret=/articles/list&category=marketplace&page=2&search[status]=3&search[sort]=date+desc&search[article_subtypes][]=600&search[has_multimedia]=

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Viruses Help Scientists to Track Tooth and Bone Mineralization

Viruses Help Scientists to Track Tooth and Bone Mineralization

Viruses Help Scientists to Track Tooth and Bone Mineralization

At the National Institute of Standards and Technology scientists are using a technique called “phage display” to track the formation of hydroxyapatite, a calcium phosphate compound that makes up teeth and bones.

Although they have somewhat different mechanical properties, the major structural component of both teeth and bones is a crystalline compound of calcium phosphate called hydroxyapatite. Subtle variations in the way the crystal forms account for the differences. Identifying and monitoring the formation of this particular crystal is of paramount importance to biomedical researchers working on a variety of problems including the remineralization of teeth to repair decay damage, the integration of prosthetic joints and tissue-engineered bone materials for joint and bone replacement, and cell-based therapies to regrow bone tissue.

To date, however, there is no specific, practical method to spot the formation of hydroxyapatite in living systems or tissue samples. Materials scientists can identify the crystal structure with high reliability by the pattern it makes scattering X rays, but it’s a complex procedure, requires fairly pure samples and certainly can’t be used on living systems. There are some widely used chemical assays—the von Kossa assay, for example—but these also are destructive tests, and more importantly they really test simply for the presence of the elements calcium or phosphorus. They can’t distinguish, for example, between deposits of amorphous calcium phosphate—a precursor—and the hydroxyapatite crystal.

To find a more specific, less destructive probe, the NIST team used a relatively new technique called “phage display” that can rapidly create and screen huge numbers of biomolecules for specific interactions. Phages are a primitive and ubiquitous class of viruses that infect bacteria. Some simple phages can be genetically modified to randomly assemble short sequences of amino acids—small proteins called peptides—on their outer shells as binding sites. An engineered population of phages will synthesize billions of random peptides. If these phages are exposed to the target surface—hydroxyapatite crystal in this case—and then washed off, those left behind are the ones that tend to stick. Cloning the survivors and repeating in several cycles with increasingly stringent conditions eventually isolates a handful of candidate peptides that can be further tested to measure their affinity for the target.

As reported in a recent paper, the NIST team used the technique to identify a new peptide that relies both on the chemical composition and the crystal structure of hydroxyapatite to bind to the mineral’s surface. The peptide’s ability to “recognize” the specific structure of hydroxapatite, say the researchers, could be exploited as a nondestructive tag to monitor the progress of bone and tooth mineralization for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

Source : http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/techbeat/tb2008_0709.htm#tooth

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