Archive for ‘Nebulizer’

Global Ambulatory Infusion Pump Market Research Report 2016: Medtronic, Baxter International, B. Braun Melsungen AG, Fresenius Kabi AG

Global Ambulatory Infusion Pump Market Research Report 2016: Medtronic, Baxter International, B. Braun Melsungen AG, Fresenius Kabi AG

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Ambulatory Infusion Pumps are devices which safely deliver medications and fluids such as nutrients into a patient’s body in controlled amounts. These pumps are used in hospitals, home care and any alternative care facilities. A particular pump failure can have a substantial insinuation on patient safety, which makes it compulsory for pumps to be functioned by a trained person. A patient’s mobility is witnessed to be found effective in reducing the recovery costs by enhancing clinical outcomes and reducing the length of the stay in the hospitals.

QY Research Groups’ analysts estimate the Ambulatory Infusion Pump Market to grow at a substantial CAGR during the forecast period.

 

Why should the report be purchased?
The report ‘Global Ambulatory Infusion Pump Market Research Report 2016’ highlights key dynamics of Ambulatory Infusion Pump sector. The potential of the sector has been investigated along with the key challenges. The current market scenario and future prospects of the sector has also been studied. Additionally, prime strategical activities in the market which includes product developments, mergers and acquisitions, partnerships, etc., are discussed.

 

For Requesting a Sample Copy of This Report, Please Visit:http://www.qyresearchgroups.com/request-sample/187837

Covered in this report

 

The report covers the market projection and analysis of Global Ambulatory Infusion Pump Market Research Report 2016 on a global as well as regional level. The report is a composition of first-hand data, quantitative and qualitative valuation by industry analysts, contributions from industry experts along with their latest verbatim and every industry players through the value chain. The experts have further evaluated the overall sales and revenue generation of this market. Further, the report renders comprehensive analysis of root market trends, macro-economic indicators and various governing elements, along with market enhancements according to each segment. Also, the report comprises of various profiles of fundamental market players of Ambulatory Infusion Pump market.

 

  • Tate & Lyle plc (UK)
  • Ajinomoto Co., Inc. (Japan)
  • Celanese Corporation (US)
  • Cumberland Packing Corporation (US)
  • Heartland Food Products Group (US)
  • Hermes Sweeteners Ltd. (Switzerland)
  • HYET Sweet S.A.S. (France)
  • Merisant (US)
  • JK Sucralose, Inc. (China)

With thorough market segment in terms of different Countries, this report divides the global market into a few key countries, with sales (consumption), revenue, market share, and growth rate of Ambulatory Infusion Pump in these countries over the forecast period.

  • North America
  • Europe
  • China
  • Japan
  • Southeast Asia
  • India

To Browse the Entire Report, Visit: http://www.qyresearchgroups.com/report/global-ambulatory-infusion-pump-market-research-report-2016

 

Furthermore, this market report is segregated with reference to various product types and their respective applications. The product types are conglomerated keeping in focus the production, revenue, price, market share, and growth rate of every single type. Besides, based on their applications, the report focuses on consumption, market share, and growth rate of Ambulatory Infusion Pump in each application.

 

About Us:

QY Research Groups is a company that simplifies how analysts and decision makers get industry data for their business. Our unique colossal technology has been developed to offer refined search capabilities designed to exploit the long tail of free market research whilst eliminating irrelevant results. QY Research Groups is the collection of market intelligence products and services on the Web. We offer reports and update our collection daily to provide you with instant online access to the world’s most complete and current database of expert insights on global industries, companies, products, and trends.

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New Fluorescent Technique Opens Window on Neuronal Activity

New Fluorescent Technique Opens Window on Neuronal Activity

New Fluorescent Technique Opens Window on Neuronal Activity

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have created a new generation of fast-acting fluorescent dyes that optically highlight electrical activity in neuronal membranes. The work is published in this week’s online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The ability to visualize these small, fast-changing voltage differences between the interior and exterior of neurons – known as transmembrane potential – is considered a powerful method for deciphering how brain cells function and interact.

However, current monitoring methods fall short, said the study’s first author Evan W. Miller, a post-doctoral researcher in the lab of Roger Tsien, PhD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, UC San Diego professor of pharmacology, chemistry and biochemistry and 2008 Nobel Prize co-winner in chemistry for his work on green fluorescent protein.

“The most common method right now monitors the movement of calcium ions into the cell,” said Miller. “It provides some broad indication, but it’s an indirect measurement that misses activity we see when directly measuring voltage changes.”

Voltage Sensing Dyes

Leech neurons stained with voltage-sensitive dye.

The new method employs dyes that penetrate only the membrane of neurons, either in in vitro cells cultured with the dye or, for this study, taken up by neurons in a living leech model. When the dyed cells are exposed to light, neuronal firing causes the dye momentarily to glow more brightly, a flash that can be captured with a high-speed camera.

“One of the tradeoffs with using voltage-sensing dyes in the past is that when they were reasonably sensitive to voltage changes, they were slow compared to the actual physiological events,” said Miller. “The new dye gives big signals but is much faster and doesn’t perturb the neurons. We essentially see no lag time between the optical signal and electrodes (used to double-check neuronal activity).”

The new method provides a wider view of neuronal activity, said Miller. More importantly, it makes it possible for neuroscientists to do accurate, single trial experiments. “Right now, you have to repeat experiments with cells, and then average the results, which is physiologically less relevant and meaningful.”

For Tsien, the new dyes address a career-long challenge.

“These results are the first demonstration of a new mechanism to sense membrane voltage, which is particularly satisfying to me because this was the first problem I started working on as a graduate student in 1972, with little success back then,” said Tsien. “Later, we devised indirect solutions such as calcium imaging or dyes that gave big but slow responses to voltage. These techniques have been very useful in other areas of biology or in drug screening, but didn’t properly solve the original problem. I think we are finally on the right track, four decades later.”

Funding for this research came, in part, from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, including the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

Co-authors are John Y. Lin, Department of Pharmacology, UC San Diego; E. Paxon Frady, Neurosciences Graduate Group, UC San Diego; Paul A. Steinbach, Department of Pharmacology, UC San Diego and Howard Hughes Medical Institute; William B. Kristan, Jr., Division of Biological Sciences, UC San Diego.

Fluorescence imaging is an attractive method for monitoring neuronal activity. A key challenge for optically monitoring voltage is development of sensors that can give large and fast responses to changes in transmembrane potential. We now present fluorescent sensors that detect voltage changes in neurons by modulation of photo-induced electron transfer (PeT) from an electron donor through a synthetic molecular wire to a fluorophore. These dyes give bigger responses to voltage than electrochromic dyes, yet have much faster kinetics and much less added capacitance than existing sensors based on hydrophobic anions or voltage-sensitive ion channels. These features enable single-trial detection of synaptic and action potentials in cultured hippocampal neurons and intact leech ganglia. Voltage-dependent PeT should be amenable to much further optimization, but the existing probes are already valuable indicators of neuronal activity.

Studying neuronal activity has been difficult due to a lack of methods that provide localized, real time feedback. Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have now developed a new technique that utilizes special voltage reactive dyes that only pass through the membrane of neurons. When light is applied to the dyed neurons, they glow slightly more in response. Because former techniques lacked precision, results of multiple experiments had to be averaged out in order to get a clear picture. With the new method, individual experiments on the activity of neurons can be conducted

From the announcement:

“One of the tradeoffs with using voltage-sensing dyes in the past is that when they were reasonably sensitive to voltage changes, they were slow compared to the actual physiological events,” said Miller [Evan W. Miller, a UCSD post-doc]. “The new dye gives big signals but is much faster and doesn’t perturb the neurons. We essentially see no lag time between the optical signal and electrodes (used to double-check neuronal activity).”

The new method provides a wider view of neuronal activity, said Miller. More importantly, it makes it possible for neuroscientists to do accurate, single trial experiments. “Right now, you have to repeat experiments with cells, and then average the results, which is physiologically less relevant and meaningful.”

For Tsien [Roger Tsien, PhD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, UC San Diego professor of pharmacology, chemistry and biochemistry and 2008 Nobel Prize co-winner in chemistry for his work on green fluorescent protein], the new dyes address a career-long challenge.

“These results are the first demonstration of a new mechanism to sense membrane voltage, which is particularly satisfying to me because this was the first problem I started working on as a graduate student in 1972, with little success back then,” said Tsien. “Later, we devised indirect solutions such as calcium imaging or dyes that gave big but slow responses to voltage. These techniques have been very useful in other areas of biology or in drug screening, but didn’t properly solve the original problem. I think we are finally on the right track, four decades later.”

Source : http://health.ucsd.edu/news/releases/Pages/2012-01-25-fluorescent-neurons.aspx

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JettPak Helps Parents Deliver Nebulizer Treatment

JettPak Helps Parents Deliver Nebulizer Treatment

JettPak Helps Parents Deliver Nebulizer Treatment

Any parent of an asthmatic child knows that nebulizer treatments can be a nightmare. For the toddler, they can be scary, uncomfortable or tedious, and he or she may struggle or simply refuse to cooperate. The parent can force treatment, traumatizing everyone in the process and lessening the effectiveness of the dose: the medicine cup may spill, or the child’s increased respiration may result in shallow breathing, reducing penetration of the medicine. Or the parent can simply skip the treatment and avoid the trauma, but this may put the child at risk for an asthma attack.

Because it’s so difficult to use a nebulizer with young children, some doctors recommend that children — especially infants — receive their treatment via the mouthpiece “blow by” method while they are asleep. The child won’t struggle, and the medicine is better absorbed into the lungs because the breathing is slow and deep.

But nebulizers are simply not made for patients who are lying down. The medicine cup must remain upright while the mouthpiece is somehow positioned so that the mist can enter the sleeping child’s airway. And using a mask is impractical on a sleeping child. Even if the “blow by” method is used successfully, it’s difficult to hold the cup upright and keep the mouthpiece steady for the ten to fifteen minutes required for a dose. So what’s a parent to do?

JettPak makes nighttime nebulizer treatments a whole lot easier

jettpak-lets-you-use-asthma-nebulizer-while-child-is-asleepIntroducing JettPak, the first and only product that is designed to help administer nebulizer treatments to children while they are sleeping. JettPak is a hands-free and mask-free nebulizer accessory that helps to make nebulizer treatments easier for you and your child. JettPak, itself, is not a nebulizer, but it works with every nebulizer on the market, and it can be attached to a variety of bedside surfaces found in a home or a hospital. JettPak’s adjustable arm can be moved to accommodate a child who is sleeping in any position. Inside the arm is a disposable, medical-grade plastic tube that carries the medicated mist to the child’s airway. JettPak quick to set up, easy to use and it works.

Key features of JettPak:

JettPak is child-friendly. The mechanical delivery arm can be moved to any position to accommodate a sleeping child. A mask-less delivery means there is less likelihood that a child will fight the treatment when awake, or wake up when asleep. Because there is less resistance, treatment times are generally shorter.

JettPak is parent-friendly. It can be positioned to accommodate a child sleeping in any position. Once positioned, JettPak is hands-free, which means less room for positioning error during the ten- to fifteen-minute delivery and more time to engage in other close-at-hand tasks. You could browse the web, read a book, or catch up on laundry.

JettPak is medicine-friendly. With less chance of positioning error and a medicine cup that remains upright 100% of the time, the child gets more of the medicine. Independent lab testing has shown that JettPak is just as effective – and in some cases more effective – than other nebulizer treatment methods such as “blow by” or a face mask.

JettPak’s usefulness isn’t limited to asthma patients. It can also help to treat patients with cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema and other respiratory diseases. Any time a nebulizer treatment is required, but the patient cannot remain awake and upright, JettPak can allow a clinician, caregiver, or family member to effectively treat the patient without disturbances.

When will JettPak be available for purchase?

JettPak-PrototypeJettPak is still in the prototype phase, and we will be spending the rest of 2012 fine-tuning it. We hope to release the finished product in 2013. Our patents are pending, and we have already conducted tests at Bend Research, in which JettPak passed efficacy standards with flying colors. All that’s left now is to finish conducting real-world application trials. Currently, JettStream is conducting private in-home trials, and we’re preparing to begin clinical trials at Bend Memorial Clinic in Bend, Oregon. When we finish, we hope to have a polished and parent-tested product that will be ready to sell to the public, directly from the JettStream website.

Stay tuned…

If you are interested in purchasing a JettPak, or if you would like to stay up-to-date on JettStream’s progress, please sign up for our upcoming newsletter using the form below. In the meantime, check out our JettEducation section for more information on childhood asthma. In the JettCommunity Blog, you can read co-founder Sarah Cota’s own stories and perspective as she struggles with her own son’s childhood asthma. Or sign up for our JettCommunity discussion boards, and add your own voice to the community.

Frustrated by the challenges of giving her young son his daily asthma treatments, Sarah Cota came up with an idea. Why not ease the burden of using a nebulizer by taking away the mask and using it while the child is sleeping?

That’s the idea behind the JettPak, the flagship product being developed by Bend, Oregon startup JettStream Inc. It’s a hands-free, mask-free add-on for nebulizers currently on the market. Intended to deliver medication to the child while he’s sleeping, the base of the device can slide under a pillow or mattress. The JettPak has an adjustable arm that delivers the medication next to the child’s face. According to a July blog post from Jim Harrer, an entrepreneur and chief operations officer of the company, it will retail for about $200.

Cota didn’t return a call last week, but she told the Cascade Business News earlier this month that the estimated launch date for the device was spring 2013. Right now, the startup is raising money for the launch; it’s already secured $115,000 in debt and equity, and could raise up to $750,000, according to a recent U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing. As the company’s website notes, it has already done lab testing that shows the device delivers the same doses of medicine as a nebulizer alone, and it’s planning to do a clinical trial with 50 devices at Bend Memorial Clinic.

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Asthma is the most common chronic childhood disease and affects nearly 5 million U.S. children. In addition to quick-relief medications, long-term control medications taken daily are often prescribed. Many of these medications can be used with a nebulizer for asthma sufferers who are too sick or young to use an inhaler effectively. But some children show resistance to these administration methods, as detailed in Cota’s blog.

She’s working with a former product development executive, Matt Smith, and Harrer to bring the device to market.

Companion to the device is JettEducation, an online database being developed for parents, and JettCommunity, a digital support community.

Asthmatic children often need to receive nebulizer treatments to help prevent future attacks; but this involves putting on a mask and spending some time wearing it while absorbing the medication. As anyone can imagine, this frightens little kids, and is less than fun for the parents. Doctors suggest trying to administer treatment to kids while they’re sleeping, if they don’t accept it during the day – but the mask is designed for upright use. So what’s a parent to do?

Well, if you’re Sarah Cota you design a technological solution, the JettPak. The device looks like an adjustable desk lamp with a nozzle at the end that is positioned near the child’s mouth for continuous medication delivery. Once set, the parent can standby playing a few rounds of Angry Birds while the child is getting the needed medication. The device is still in development, but JettStream, the company setup to commercialize it, hopes to have it out on the market sometime next year.

source : http://jettstreaminc.com/index.php/our-products

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