Posts Tagged ‘Blood Glucose’

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Smart Diabetes Monitor VerioIQ Tracks Glucose Patterns

Smart Diabetes Monitor VerioIQ Tracks Glucose Patterns

Smart Diabetes Monitor VerioIQ Tracks Glucose Patterns

The health information on this Web site is for general background purposes and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific conditions. Seek prompt medical attention for healthcare questions you have. Consult your physician before making changes to your medication, diet, fitness program or blood glucose testing schedules.

© LifeScan Canada Ltd. 1998-2012. Trademarks are owned by Johnson & Johnson and used under licence. The third party trademarks used herein are trademarks of their respective owners.

Sometimes it seems that there are almost as many diabetes monitors, or glucometers, as there are people with diabetes (well, not really, but you get the point). Furthermore, each one seems to tout a different set of features that differentiate it from the rest. So when we at Medgadget were approached by the people at Life Scan about their new OneTouch Verio IQ Meter, we were curious to learn more. Described as “the first meter ever that looks for patterns of highs and lows—and alerts you, right on screen, when it finds one,” the VerioIQ is a hand-held monitor with a simple array of four buttons, a color display screen, memory to hold 750 recordings, and bilingual (English/Spanish) capability.

Like most current glucometers, it provides the user a lance to draw blood via finger-prick. This editor was provided with a complimentary review device and found it to be user-friendly, though had to lend it out to a diabetic colleague who was impressed enough with the added features. The key development is the VerioIQ’s PatternAlert system that detects time ranges during a five-day period during which the patient’s glucose is running abnormally high or low, thus virtually eliminating the need for a logbook. For those with extremely well-managed diabetes this is likely not as much of an issue, though it’s clear how patients with more variable glucose levels may benefit.

Medgadget had the opportunity to interview Life Scan’s Associate Director of Marketing, Kamal Bhandal, about the new device:

Medgadget: Can you please discuss your newest product, OneTouch VerioIQ, and why diabetic patients may uniquely benefit from it?

Bhandal: The key to successfully managing diabetes is keeping blood sugar levels in a healthy range. You want to minimize the highs and lows. Blood glucose testing provides the information a patient and doctor need to see how food choices and activity affect blood sugar, and to adjust treatment if necessary. But making sense of your results and knowing what to do with them can be a challenge.

The OneTouch VerioIQ is the first and only meter that looks for patterns of high and low blood sugar and alerts people right on the screen. With every test, the OneTouch VerioIQ Meter compares the current result with previous ones and alerts the patient to patterns he or she might not even be aware of. This is important for people on insulin who are at the greatest risk of experiencing low blood sugar which can be dangerous. So spotting and correcting a developing pattern of low blood sugars as early as possible is key. A companion OneTouch VerioIQ Pattern Guide is also available and offers possible causes and potential solutions for high and low patterns.

Medgadget: Does OneTouch have any plans on moving into the smart phone market?

Bhandal: We recognize that many consumers rely on their smart phones for a variety of daily tasks and could benefit from diabetes management solutions offered on a mobile platform. While we don’t have any new product announcements at this time, we are continuously looking to develop innovative solutions that integrate as seamlessly as possible into people’s lives to help improve their diabetes management and daily self-care decisions .

Medgadget: What are you most excited about with regard to the future of diabetes management and care?

Bhandal: This is truly the information age when it comes to diabetes management. Patients need to understand what their results mean and how to act on them. One of the greatest opportunities is to give them the tools to help them and their healthcare professional make the best daily self-care decisions possible. The key is to make them simple, easy and relevant. For example, we know that most people with diabetes treat their out of range high or low blood glucose results in the moment and move on. But if they’re not proactively looking for root causes, they can get on a roller coaster of just reacting to highs and lows – over and over again – without even realizing that they may be connected. That’s why we developed the OneTouch VerioIQ System. It’s the first and only meter to look for patterns of high and low blood sugar and alert patients right on the screen so they can more easily recognize the issue and take action to correct potential problems. This is the kind of innovation that we believe can have a significant impact on how people understand and manage their diabetes.

Source : http://www.onetouch.ca/verioiq

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Foreign Representative Interviews

Foreign Representative Interviews

AdvaMed 2012 Part II: Foreign Representative Interviews

I spent last Wednesday at AdvaMed 2012, the annual global medtech conference, speaking to individual entrepreneurs and country representatives. It was a nice contrast to the large-scale roundtables and panels, as it gave me a chance to see what specific companies have in the pipeline and what services they offer. This post will focus on the company representatives I spoke to, while my next post will focus on interviews with foreign country reps.

I first spoke with Larry Gerrans, CEO of Sanovas, a Sausalito, CA-based company launched in 2010. Sanovas is developing an innovative micro-surgical platform for diagnosing and treating lung cancer and other pulmonary diseases. According to Larry, 96 million people have or at risk for developing pulmonary disease, most notably lung cancer. However, diagnosis often occurs when the disease has already metastasized throughout the lungs and/or body. Larry and colleagues had an idea in 2001 to advance the miniaturization of lung-based diagnostics, as the lung was a traditionally difficult area to visualize non-operatively. Utilizing the world’s smallest surgical camera, Sanovas’ technology allows surgeons to access, visualize and deliver treatments to areas of the anatomy that were previously inaccessible with lower risks of bleeding that other devices due to a non-thermal recannulation methods. In addition to the camera, Sanovas is working on technologies in both diagnostics and targeted delivery therapeutics. For example, Larry showed me an internal video of a balloon-based catheter that allows for targeted resection of lung disease. Such a procedure, among other benefits, could transform what would normally be a 1-week postoperative stay for an open lung biopsy to a 23-hour stay after an outpatient procedure.

Check out a video of Larry speaking as part of a segment on lung cancer on the TV show “Profiles with Terry Bradshaw”:

I next spoke with Chris Jones, CEO of Glysure Limited. Glysure is working to develop in-hospital continuous glucose monitoring devices. Tight glucose monitoring (TGM) has been shown in several studies to be a critical determinant of mortality in ICU and critically ill patients. To achieve TGM, however, we must first have a method to measure glucose real-time in ICUs rather than by fingersticks. The GlySure solution is a single-use multi-day intravascular fiber optic sensor with integrated automatic calibration. Its particular chemistry enables low-cost, high margin sensors. Clinical trials in ICU settings, which began in 2010, have confirmed the sensors’ performance and the ability of Glysure to provide a new dimension in Intensive Insulin Therapy (IIT).

Check out Glysure’s press release on how the fully automated calibration system maximizes accuracy of continuous blood glucose monitoring while reducing nursing labor burden…

I next had a chance to speak with Patty Nichols, Director of Medical Technology at Travelers. Travelers, a Connecticut based insurance company, works to protect emerging global medtech companies by providing property and liability coverage. Speaking to Patty was interesting because it brought to light many of the potential issues that emerging entrepreneurs may face as they work to develop their technologies and brought to light potential unforeseen problems. For example, Patty mentioned a panel that Travelers attended at AdvaMed on “Device Hacking”, potential theft of data from emerging companies, and how these companies can protect against that.

Check out a press release of MedFirst, Travelers’ innovative liability insurance…

My last two interviews of the day were with two companies that focus in part on product development. I spoke to Gillian Davies, PhD, Senior Consultant of Sagentia, a global technology and product development company. Sagentia focuses on both large multinational companies and small startups in providing consulting for product design and company development. Gillian and I had a great conversation on how medtech companies can no longer focus on just the “coolness” of their technologies. With increasing focus on outcomes and impact in health care systems, companies must work backwards from an unmet need to a technology and not the other way around. Gillian spoke about how the “technology push” has persisted for far too long in the US, and how clinical need and usability will become the primary determinants of success, especially as venture capital funding becomes more limited. The example she specifically gave to me was of iBGStar, Sanofi’s blood glucose monitoring system, which now sells on the Apple Store in addition to directly to physicians.

Check out some of the services Sagentia offers…

EBR main AdvaMed 2012 Part I: Company InterviewsThe last person I spoke to at the end of a very long day was Simon Karger, Associate Director of Surgical & Interventional products at Cambridge Consultants. Cambridge Consultants is a leading medical technology design and development firm with offices in Cambridge, MA and UK. Coincidentally, they also hosted an industry workshop in Boston recently to discuss the future of surgery, so they had some interesting insights and thoughts in that area. Cambridge Consultants has been focusing on the surgical and interventional space of surgery to develop ideas into usable tools for general surgeons. In particular, they touted the success of their leadless pacemaker, the Wireless Cardiac Stimulation system (WiCS), in collaboration with start-up company EBR Systems. Cambridge Consultants has several technologies in the pipeline including an ultrasonic technology to diagnose and mechanically reduce blood clots in the legs.

Source : http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa011300

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JewelPUMP Insulin Delivery Platform with Smartphone Remote Control

JewelPUMP Insulin Delivery Platform with Smartphone Remote Control

JewelPUMP Insulin Delivery Platform with Smartphone Remote Control

Debiotech of Lausanne, Switzerland is bringing to the worldwide market its JewelPUMP insulin delivery device. The JewelPUMP carries 500 Units of insulin, providing a week’s worth use without having to change the pump (you’ll still have to replace the cannula patch every three days).

JewelCOM JewelPUMP Insulin Delivery Platform with Smartphone Remote ControlTo program the electronic patch, Debiotech developed their own Android powered phone, the JewelCOM, that features an integrated blood glucose meter. It uses dedicated SIM card security to communicate with the JewelPUMP, making it according to the company “the

most secure remotely controlled medical device ever conceived.” If you do misplace your phone, though, there are a couple buttons on the pump itself that you can use to deliver a bolus. Once you find the phone and it’s back within range of the pump, it will reprogram the delivery dosage as needed.

More from Severin Leven, PhD, lead of the JewelPUMP electronics team:

The communication between the JewelPUMP and the JewelCOM is using the new Bluetooth low energy mode and, thanks to the MEMS pump-chip, the JewelPUMP can operate for 7 days on a single green battery (mercury and lithium free). We have even incorporated a temperature sensor into the JewelPUMP to inform the patient in case the insulin would be over-exposed to heat. Last but not least, we have added a sensor to automatically detect any disconnection of the JewelPUMP from the cannula patch to automatically suspend the insulin delivery until it is reattached.

First Diabetes Clinical Study with the JewelPump™

(June 4, 2012)

Debiotech presents its new DIALEASETM system at EDTA-ERA in Paris

(May 21, 2012)

BRACCO Imaging acquires Debiotech’s subsidiary “Swiss Medical Care”.

(August 1, 2011)

JewelPUMP: “Best in show at ADA” says Diabetes Mine

(June 28th, 2010)

STMicroelectronics and Debiotech Debut Jewel Pump at ADA Congress,US

(June 23th, 2010)

Kimal Medical Systems introduces the Kimal IVantage infusion pump (June 1st, 2010)

Debiotech and EPFL receive the CTI Medtech Award 2008 in Bern

(September 2nd, 2008)

STMicroelectronics and Debiotech Announce First Prototypes of Disposable Insulin Nanopump.

(June 23th, 2008)

Gambro and Debiotech enter global partnership agreement in the area of Peritoneal Dialysis.

(March 19th, 2008)

Strategic agreement with STMicroelectronics regarding Debiotech’s

Insulin Nanopump

(April 19th, 2007)

Debiotech receives a Swiss Technology Award for its Renal Exprés

(March 1st, 2007)

CT Exprés III receives FDA clearance

(January 2nd, 2007)

Debiotech receives the Frost & Sullivan Enabling Technology 2006 Award

(November 13th, 2006)

Debiotech receives the Frost & Sullivan Entrepreneurial Company Award 2006

(July 7th, 2006)

Debiotech’s IV Pump receives the 2006 Medical Design Excellence Award

(April 10th, 2006)

Debiotech S.A. and EPFL in a collaborative alliance in the field of drug-eluting coatings.

(February 14th, 2006)

Debiotech receives a Swiss Technology Award 2006 and the Vontobel Prize

(January 27th, 2006)

IV Expres sales by Delphi Medical reach over $100 million in bookings

(December 7th, 2005)

Debioject® Reconstitution System to be used by Watson pharmaceuticals in the US

(April 29th, 2005)

Debiotech collaboration with EPFL on Dialysis

(November 29th, 2004)

Interview of Dr. Frederic Neftel, CEO of Debiotech, by the Wall street Reporter

(July 9th, 2004)

Debiotech announces license agreement with

DELPHI Medical Systems

(june 29th, 2004)

Debiotech receives the 2004 Medical Design Excellence Award (MDEA)

(june 16th, 2004)

Debiotech as “World Class” company in the Swiss financial HandelsZeitung

(june 9th, 2004)

Based on an ultra-miniaturized and highly precise MEMS pump

chip technology, developed and manufactured in partnership with

ST Microelectronics, the JewelPUMP is addressing still unmet needs

for diabetic patients.

“The JewelPUMP is the result of a tremendous effort to bring the

best of what advanced technology can offer for the benefit of the

patient, while complying with newly established regulatory

requirements for insulin pumps,” says Frédéric Neftel, MD, President

and CEO of DEBIOTECH SA. “We not only wanted to make the pump

really small, extremely safe and accurate, we also wanted to make

it really convenient to use while being concealed and so discreet

that you would forget you are under pump therapy. The results we

had the pleasure to present at the EASD are aligned with those

objectives thanks to an entirely new integrated platform of products

intended to fulfill diabetic patients needs and the latest regulatory

requirements. The comments and encouragements we received

from the large number of visitors we welcomed in our booth in

Berlin are certainly the greatest reward our

engineers and technicians could get for their intense work and

commitment to diabetes care.”

Source : http://www.debiotech.com/

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Hygieia’s DIGS Automatic Insulin Titration Device Shows Promise; Company Talks to Medgadget

Hygieia’s DIGS Automatic Insulin Titration Device Shows Promise; Company Talks to Medgadget

Hygieia’s DIGS Automatic Insulin Titration Device Shows Promise; Company Talks to Medgadget

An experimental new device called Diabetes Insulin Guidance System (DIGS) from Hygieia, Inc. (Ann Arbor, MI) is being developed to automate insulin dosage titration in patients with type I and type II diabetes, based on measurements of blood glucose and analysis of patterns in the obtained data. The company hopes one day to provide patients with an automatically calculated insulin dosage adjustments between doctor visits, in hopes of improving their glycemic control.

The company’s clinical advisory board is packed with diabetes experts such as Martin Abrahamson, MD from Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, so they obviously know what they are doing. And the latest data seems to confirm that. A recent publication in Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics is quite positive for the technology, as it demonstrated DIGS’ potential to improve blood glucose control for insulin-using patients with type 2 or type 1 diabetes. Over the 12-week intervention period of the study, investigators observed:

Out of a total of 1,734 individual dosage adjustments, the study team over-rode the DIGS-instructed dosage only twice.

Mean HbA1c levels decreased from a baseline of 8.4%(±0.8) to 7.9%(±0.9); (p

Average patient blood glucose levels improved progressively from a baseline of 174.2 mg/dL(±36.7) to 163.3mg/dL(±35.1); (p

Glucose levels falling below the hypoglycemic threshold (glucose < 65 mg/dL) during the 12-week active phase were significantly milder than the ones reported during the 4-week run-in period (P = 0.02).

Beth North, Hygieia, Inc.’s VP of Marketing provided us with more details about the system in the following statement:

Without getting stuck in the weeds of too much detail – here’s the logic of how DIGS works. Per our “patient-first” design approach, DIGS communicates with its user in a very simple and logical way. DIGS is about the size of a BlackBerry device and nothing attaches to the patient. The patient uses DIGS to measure their blood glucose, then DIGS recommends the amount of insulin to inject. DIGS is designed to make insulin therapy more effective. If DIGS sees glucose patterns are too high, it increases insulin dosage; if it sees lows, it reduces insulin dosage. The exact specifics of “how” it does this populate about 20,000 lines of code.

From all indications, when applied, these lines of code result in a good outcome. As mentioned in our press release DIGS generated 1734 individual insulin dosage adjustments during the IDC study and in all but two instances the study team gave the DIGS-generated dosage updates directly to the patients to use each week. And over the 12 weeks of the active phase, all the study participants benefited significantly.

As Rich Bergenstal, the PI for the published study said, “This demonstrates the possibility that DIGS could automate weekly dosage adjustment safely and effectively – something that none of our current tools is capable of achieving.”

DIGS is designed to extend the reach of the health care provider when they can’t be with their patients – between office visits. Because Hygieia’s unique approach is self-contained and handheld, DIGS is scalable and works in a way that makes it a feasible solution for thousands of health care professionals treating millions of insulin users (who mainly have type 2 diabetes). It is designed to make insulin therapy more effective and avoid adding burden to an already over-burdened system of diabetes health care delivery.

Source : http://www.hygieiainc.com/index.html

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Cambridge Consultants Develop Concept Eco-friendly Blood Glucose Meter

Cambridge Consultants Develop Concept Eco-friendly Blood Glucose Meter

Cambridge Consultants Develop Concept Eco-friendly Blood Glucose Meter

New eco-friendly breed of medical devices

Blood glucose monitor concept is easier to use and cuts environmental impact by two-thirds

A blood glucose monitor concept for diabetics that’s simpler to use, less cumbersome to carry and has a third of the environmental impact of traditional devices has been developed by Cambridge Consultants. The concept is the latest result of ‘Ecovation’ – an approach developed by the leading technology design and development firm to integrate environmental considerations into its radical concept generation process.

More than 346 million people worldwide have diabetes*, and monitoring glucose levels is a critical part of managing the condition and preventing long-term complications. Insulin-treated diabetics are advised to test blood glucose levels four times a day. Many existing blood glucose monitors require separate lancets, test strips, storage tubs for carrying these items, and sharps bins for disposal. This can mean the devices are fiddly to use, inconvenient to transport, and wasteful.

Applying the Ecovation process, Cambridge Consultants conducted a ‘life cycle assessment’ on a popular blood glucose monitor to identify which elements had the highest environmental impact and so should be the focus for innovation. It was identified that less than 5% of the environmental impact could be attributed to the monitor itself – with more than 70% due to the high number of single-use disposables that are consumed over the lifetime of the device.

Ideas generated to reduce the environmental impact ranged from efficient packing of unused and used components, to safe reuse of ‘single-use’ lancets and test strips. The winning concept achieved a 65% reduction in environmental impact by integrating the functionality of three previously discrete consumables and getting the device to do the handling – not the user. The final challenge was then to create a single consumable cartridge, which was both reliable and suitable for manufacturing.

For the user this novel concept has significant benefits. The integrated monitor design is easier to carry around, with fewer consumables requiring separate storage and transport. The cartridge design means the user only has to worry about loading the device once every 28 tests – and, by combining the lancets and test strips in the monitor itself, the glucose test is far easier to administer and more discreet for the user.

“What makes this concept so exciting is that, while it provides a sustainable alternative to the status quo, it also offers distinct usability advantages,” said Andy Pidgeon, of the Medical Technology division at Cambridge Consultants. “We have long championed combining the safety and reliability of the medical development framework with the broader lens of a consumer experience approach in order to create solutions that patients use both safely and willingly. Adding environmental considerations into the design process through Ecovation provides a framework for a new breed of superior medical devices.”

The approach employed in Ecovation can be applied to any type of product to reduce its overall environmental impact. For example, Cambridge Consultants previously demonstrated the methodology by producing an eco-vacuum concept that uses 43% less energy than the average vacuum cleaner.

“The Ecovation process, as demonstrated by our blood glucose monitor concept, has the potential to make a significant step change in reducing the eco-impact of almost any product,” said Gemma Evans, Senior Consultant in Innovation Management at Cambridge Consultants. “Applying Ecovation principles at the design stage needs to become standard practice if we are to reduce our carbon footprint. But making a product greener should never take away from its reliability or functionality and, as we have demonstrated, it can in fact improve its usability and the user experience while minimising its environmental impact.”

Cambridge Consultants has developed a concept blood glucose monitor that should be simpler to use, less cumbersome to carry and has a third of the environmental impact of traditional devices. When assessing which parts of traditional devices had the highest environmental impact, the design firm discovered that less than 5% of the environmental impact could be attributed to the monitor itself, while more than 70% was attributed to single-use disposables used over the lifetime of the device.

Existing blood glucose monitors require separate lancets, test strips, storage tubs for carrying these items and sharps bins for disposal. This makes them fiddly to use, inconvenient to transport and wasteful, especially if you consider that diabetics are testing their blood glucose about four times a day. The solution was to create a single consumable cartridge that integrates lancets and teststrips into the monitor itself.

The cartridge carries enough lancets and test strips for 28 tests and the device does all the handling. For the patient this only leaves the glucose meter itself to be carried around, without any additional components. Taken together, this makes the glucose test far easier to administer and much more discreet. It sure looks like a great concept, but it is still just a concept device at this stage, so hopefully a manufacturer will take on the challenge of mass-producing it sooner rather than later.

Source : http://www.cambridgeconsultants.com/news/pr/release/102/en

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iBGStar Glucometer for iPhone Now Available in U.S.

iBGStar Glucometer for iPhone Now Available in U.S.

iBGStar Glucometer for iPhone Now Available in U.S.

BRIDGEWATER, N.J., – May 2, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Sanofi US announced today that the iBGStar® Blood Glucose Monitoring System, consisting of the iBGStar® blood glucose meter and iBGStar® Diabetes Manager App, is commercially available in the U.S. iBGStar® is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cleared blood glucose meter that directly connects to the iPhone® and iPod touch®, offering accurate blood glucose monitoring that seamlessly integrates into the lives of people with diabetes. iBGStar® is available for purchase at Apple® Retail Stores and all Walgreens stores nationwide, online at Apple.com, Walgreens.com and through Diabetic Care Services.

“Many people with diabetes today rely both on their iPhone® or iPod touch® and blood glucose monitors as important parts of their daily lives,” said Naina Sinha, MD, an in-patient diabetes attending physician and assistant professor of medicine at a leading academic medical center and university in New York City. “By combining these two essential tools, iBGStar® makes it possible to provide blood glucose tracking, monitoring and reporting together in a new way.”

About iBGStar®

When iBGStar® is directly connected to an iPhone® or iPod touch® and used with the iBGStar® Diabetes Manager App, blood glucose results are presented on the Multi-Touch display quickly after monitoring.

iBGStar® can also be used independently to measure blood glucose levels; results can be synchronized later to an iPhone® or iPod touch®. iBGStar® and BGStar® Blood Glucose Test Strips, which are used with iBGStar®, are available at all Walgreens stores nationwide and online at Walgreens.com and through Diabetic Care Services. These test strips may be covered under certain health insurance plans so individuals should check directly with their provider.

The iBGStar® Diabetes Manager App has a range of features and multiple views for analyzing glucose patterns on-the-go. Visual graphs and statistics can help people record and track their readings, carbohydrate intake, insulin doses (if taking insulin) and more. Color-coded scorecards show individual monitoring results for easy identification of high or low blood glucose levels. A ‘share’ function allows specific data to be sent via e-mail to caregivers and/or healthcare teams. The iBGStar® Diabetes Manager App is available for free from the App Store on iPhone® and iPod touch® or at www.itunes.com/appstore.

“Sanofi is pleased to launch iBGStar®, which expands our diabetes portfolio as we pursue comprehensive disease management offerings and further illustrates our commitment to developing innovative solutions that help improve the lives of people with diabetes,” commented Dennis Urbaniak, Vice President, Head of U.S. Diabetes, Sanofi US. “The iBGStar® Blood Glucose Monitoring System will help people living with diabetes check their blood sugar and communicate with their healthcare teams, using mobile technologies that have become central to so many people’s lives.”

In March 2010, Sanofi and AgaMatrix signed an agreement for the development, supply and commercialization of Blood Glucose Monitoring solutions. iBGStar® is a result of this agreement.

iBGStar® received the Good Design™ Award in 2011 for outstanding product design in the medical category from the Chicago Athenaeum of Architecture and Design and the European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies. Additionally, iBGStar® received the red dot design award in 2011 for outstanding product design in the life science and medicine category. The red dot design award is one of the most renowned international design competitions (www.red-dot.de/presse), with almost 14,000 entries from 68 countries in 2010 alone. Winners are considered to be the best design in the industry worldwide.

Apple®, iPhone® and iPod touch® are trademarks of Apple Inc, registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc. Content purchased from the iTunes Store is for personal lawful use only. Don’t steal music.

For more information, visit www.ibgstar.us.

Important Information

The iBGStar® meter and lancing device are for single patient use. Do not share them with anyone including other family members. Do not use on multiple patients. All parts of the kit are considered biohazardous and can potentially transmit infectious diseases, even after you have performed cleaning and disinfection.

About the Sanofi Diabetes Division

Sanofi strives to help people manage the complex challenges of diabetes by delivering innovative, integrated and personalized solutions. Driven by valuable insight that comes from listening to and engaging with people living with diabetes, the Company is forming partnerships to offer diagnostics, therapies, services, and devices, including innovative blood glucose monitoring systems. Sanofi markets both injectable and oral medications for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Investigational compounds in the pipeline include an injectable GLP-1 agonist being studied as a single agent, in combination with basal insulin, and/or in combination with oral antidiabetic agents.

About Sanofi

Sanofi, a global and diversified healthcare leader, discovers, develops and distributes therapeutic solutions focused on patients’ needs. Sanofi has core strengths in the field of healthcare with seven growth platforms: diabetes solutions, human vaccines, innovative drugs, consumer healthcare, emerging markets, animal health and the new Genzyme. Sanofi is listed in Paris (EURONEXT: SAN) and in New York (NYSE: SNY).

Sanofi is the holding company of a consolidated group of subsidiaries and operates in the United States as Sanofi US, also referred to as sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC. For more information on Sanofi US, please visit http://www.sanofi.us or call 1-800-981-2491.

Forward Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, as amended. Forward-looking statements are statements that are not historical facts. These statements include projections and estimates and their underlying assumptions, statements regarding plans, objectives, intentions and expectations with respect to future financial results, events, operations, services, product development and potential, and statements regarding future performance. Forward-looking statements are generally identified by the words “expects”, “anticipates”, “believes”, “intends”, “estimates”, “plans” and similar expressions. Although Sanofi’s management believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, investors are cautioned that forward-looking information and statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict and generally beyond the control of Sanofi, that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied or projected by, the forward-looking information and statements. These risks and uncertainties include among other things, the uncertainties inherent in research and development, future clinical data and analysis, including post marketing, decisions by regulatory authorities, such as the FDA or the EMA, regarding whether and when to approve any drug, device or biological application that may be filed for any such product candidates as well as their decisions regarding labelling and other matters that could affect the availability or commercial potential of such product candidates, the absence of guarantee that the product candidates if approved will be commercially successful, the future approval and commercial success of therapeutic alternatives, the Group’s ability to benefit from external growth opportunities, trends in exchange rates and prevailing interest rates, the impact of cost containment policies and subsequent changes thereto, the average number of shares outstanding as well as those discussed or identified in the public filings with the SEC and the AMF made by Sanofi, including those listed under “Risk Factors” and “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” in Sanofi’s annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2011. Other than as required by applicable law, Sanofi does not undertake any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information or statements.

Sanofi has announced that its iBGStar, the first approved blood glucose meter to interface with the iPhone, is now available in the U.S. The device will display glucose readings on the iPhone (or iPod touch) screen and those will be saved for long term analysis. On the other hand, if your iPhone is out of power or you managed to lose it, fear not, the iBGStar dock will work independently and provide readings on its own little display. While disconnected from the iPhone, the meter will save glucose levels it measures locally until it is back in touch with the phone.

Sanofi is reporting that the new glucometer is available from Apple and Walgreens at both their retail and online stores.

More from Sanofi:

The iBGStar® Diabetes Manager App has a range of features and multiple views for analyzing glucose patterns on-the-go. Visual graphs and statistics can help people record and track their readings, carbohydrate intake, insulin doses (if taking insulin) and more. Color-coded scorecards show individual monitoring results for easy identification of high or low blood glucose levels. A ‘share’ function allows specific data to be sent via e-mail to caregivers and/or healthcare teams. The iBGStar® Diabetes Manager App is available for free from the App Store on iPhone® and iPod touch® or at www.itunes.com/appstore.

In March 2010, Sanofi and AgaMatrix signed an agreement for the development, supply and commercialization of Blood Glucose Monitoring solutions. iBGStar® is a result of this agreement.

Source : http://www.multivu.com/mnr/46108-sanofi-ibgstar-blood-glucose-monitoring-system

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Cambridge Consultants Develop Concept Eco-friendly Blood Glucose Meter

Cambridge Consultants Develop Concept Eco-friendly Blood Glucose Meter

Cambridge Consultants Develop Concept Eco-friendly Blood Glucose Meter

New eco-friendly breed of medical devices

Blood glucose monitor concept is easier to use and cuts environmental impact by two-thirds

A blood glucose monitor concept for diabetics that’s simpler to use, less cumbersome to carry and has a third of the environmental impact of traditional devices has been developed by Cambridge Consultants. The concept is the latest result of ‘Ecovation’ – an approach developed by the leading technology design and development firm to integrate environmental considerations into its radical concept generation process.

More than 346 million people worldwide have diabetes*, and monitoring glucose levels is a critical part of managing the condition and preventing long-term complications. Insulin-treated diabetics are advised to test blood glucose levels four times a day. Many existing blood glucose monitors require separate lancets, test strips, storage tubs for carrying these items, and sharps bins for disposal. This can mean the devices are fiddly to use, inconvenient to transport, and wasteful.

Applying the Ecovation process, Cambridge Consultants conducted a ‘life cycle assessment’ on a popular blood glucose monitor to identify which elements had the highest environmental impact and so should be the focus for innovation. It was identified that less than 5% of the environmental impact could be attributed to the monitor itself – with more than 70% due to the high number of single-use disposables that are consumed over the lifetime of the device.

Ideas generated to reduce the environmental impact ranged from efficient packing of unused and used components, to safe reuse of ‘single-use’ lancets and test strips. The winning concept achieved a 65% reduction in environmental impact by integrating the functionality of three previously discrete consumables and getting the device to do the handling – not the user. The final challenge was then to create a single consumable cartridge, which was both reliable and suitable for manufacturing.

For the user this novel concept has significant benefits. The integrated monitor design is easier to carry around, with fewer consumables requiring separate storage and transport. The cartridge design means the user only has to worry about loading the device once every 28 tests – and, by combining the lancets and test strips in the monitor itself, the glucose test is far easier to administer and more discreet for the user.

“What makes this concept so exciting is that, while it provides a sustainable alternative to the status quo, it also offers distinct usability advantages,” said Andy Pidgeon, of the Medical Technology division at Cambridge Consultants. “We have long championed combining the safety and reliability of the medical development framework with the broader lens of a consumer experience approach in order to create solutions that patients use both safely and willingly. Adding environmental considerations into the design process through Ecovation provides a framework for a new breed of superior medical devices.”

The approach employed in Ecovation can be applied to any type of product to reduce its overall environmental impact. For example, Cambridge Consultants previously demonstrated the methodology by producing an eco-vacuum concept that uses 43% less energy than the average vacuum cleaner.

“The Ecovation process, as demonstrated by our blood glucose monitor concept, has the potential to make a significant step change in reducing the eco-impact of almost any product,” said Gemma Evans, Senior Consultant in Innovation Management at Cambridge Consultants. “Applying Ecovation principles at the design stage needs to become standard practice if we are to reduce our carbon footprint. But making a product greener should never take away from its reliability or functionality and, as we have demonstrated, it can in fact improve its usability and the user experience while minimising its environmental impact.”

New eco-friendly breed of medical devices

Blood glucose monitor concept is easier to use and cuts environmental impact by two-thirds

A blood glucose monitor concept for diabetics that’s simpler to use, less cumbersome to carry and has a third of the environmental impact of traditional devices has been developed by Cambridge Consultants. The concept is the latest result of ‘Ecovation’ – an approach developed by the leading technology design and development firm to integrate environmental considerations into its radical concept generation process.

More than 346 million people worldwide have diabetes*, and monitoring glucose levels is a critical part of managing the condition and preventing long-term complications. Insulin-treated diabetics are advised to test blood glucose levels four times a day. Many existing blood glucose monitors require separate lancets, test strips, storage tubs for carrying these items, and sharps bins for disposal. This can mean the devices are fiddly to use, inconvenient to transport, and wasteful.

Applying the Ecovation process, Cambridge Consultants conducted a ‘life cycle assessment’ on a popular blood glucose monitor to identify which elements had the highest environmental impact and so should be the focus for innovation. It was identified that less than 5% of the environmental impact could be attributed to the monitor itself – with more than 70% due to the high number of single-use disposables that are consumed over the lifetime of the device.

Ideas generated to reduce the environmental impact ranged from efficient packing of unused and used components, to safe reuse of ‘single-use’ lancets and test strips. The winning concept achieved a 65% reduction in environmental impact by integrating the functionality of three previously discrete consumables and getting the device to do the handling – not the user. The final challenge was then to create a single consumable cartridge, which was both reliable and suitable for manufacturing.

For the user this novel concept has significant benefits. The integrated monitor design is easier to carry around, with fewer consumables requiring separate storage and transport. The cartridge design means the user only has to worry about loading the device once every 28 tests – and, by combining the lancets and test strips in the monitor itself, the glucose test is far easier to administer and more discreet for the user.

“What makes this concept so exciting is that, while it provides a sustainable alternative to the status quo, it also offers distinct usability advantages,” said Andy Pidgeon, of the Medical Technology division at Cambridge Consultants. “We have long championed combining the safety and reliability of the medical development framework with the broader lens of a consumer experience approach in order to create solutions that patients use both safely and willingly. Adding environmental considerations into the design process through Ecovation provides a framework for a new breed of superior medical devices.”

The approach employed in Ecovation can be applied to any type of product to reduce its overall environmental impact. For example, Cambridge Consultants previously demonstrated the methodology by producing an eco-vacuum concept that uses 43% less energy than the average vacuum cleaner.

“The Ecovation process, as demonstrated by our blood glucose monitor concept, has the potential to make a significant step change in reducing the eco-impact of almost any product,” said Gemma Evans, Senior Consultant in Innovation Management at Cambridge Consultants. “Applying Ecovation principles at the design stage needs to become standard practice if we are to reduce our carbon footprint. But making a product greener should never take away from its reliability or functionality and, as we have demonstrated, it can in fact improve its usability and the user experience while minimising its environmental impact.”

Source : http://www.cambridgeconsultants.com/news/pr/release/102/en

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New Glucometer from Purdue Measures Glucose in Tears, Saliva

New Glucometer from Purdue Measures Glucose in Tears, Saliva

New Glucometer from Purdue Measures Glucose in Tears, Saliva

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Researchers have created a new type of biosensor that can detect minute concentrations of glucose in saliva, tears and urine and might be manufactured at low cost because it does not require many processing steps to produce.

“It’s an inherently non-invasive way to estimate glucose content in the body,” said Jonathan Claussen, a former Purdue University doctoral student and now a research scientist at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. “Because it can detect glucose in the saliva and tears, it’s a platform that might eventually help to eliminate or reduce the frequency of using pinpricks for diabetes testing. We are proving its functionality.”

Claussen and Purdue doctoral student Anurag Kumar led the project, working with Timothy Fisher, a Purdue professor of mechanical engineering; D. Marshall Porterfield, a professor of agricultural and biological engineering; and other researchers at the university’s Birck Nanotechnology Center.

Findings are detailed in a research paper being published this week in the journal Advanced Functional Materials.

“Most sensors typically measure glucose in blood,” Claussen said. “Many in the literature aren’t able to detect glucose in tears and the saliva. What’s unique is that we can sense in all four different human serums: the saliva, blood, tears and urine. And that hasn’t been shown before.”

The paper, featured on the journal’s cover, was written by Claussen, Kumar, Fisher, Porterfield and Purdue researchers David B. Jaroch, M. Haseeb Khawaja and Allison B. Hibbard.

The sensor has three main parts: layers of nanosheets resembling tiny rose petals made of a material called graphene, which is a single-atom-thick film of carbon; platinum nanoparticles; and the enzyme glucose oxidase.

Each petal contains a few layers of stacked graphene. The edges of the petals have dangling, incomplete chemical bonds, defects where platinum nanoparticles can attach. Electrodes are formed by combining the nanosheet petals and platinum nanoparticles. Then the glucose oxidase attaches to the platinum nanoparticles. The enzyme converts glucose to peroxide, which generates a signal on the electrode.

“Typically, when you want to make a nanostructured biosensor you have to use a lot of processing steps before you reach the final biosensor product,” Kumar said. “That involves lithography, chemical processing, etching and other steps. The good thing about these petals is that they can be grown on just about any surface, and we don’t need to use any of these steps, so it could be ideal for commercialization.”

In addition to diabetes testing, the technology might be used for sensing a variety of chemical compounds to test for other medical conditions.

“Because we used the enzyme glucose oxidase in this work, it’s geared for diabetes,” Claussen said. “But we could just swap out that enzyme with, for example, glutemate oxidase, to measure the neurotransmitter glutamate to test for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, or ethanol oxidase to monitor alcohol levels for a breathalyzer. It’s very versatile, fast and portable.”

The technology is able to detect glucose in concentrations as low as 0.3 micromolar, far more sensitive than other electrochemical biosensors based on graphene or graphite, carbon nanotubes and metallic nanoparticles, Claussen said

“These are the first findings to report such a low sensing limit and, at the same time, such a wide sensing range,” he said.

The sensor is able to distinguish between glucose and signals from other compounds that often cause interference in sensors: uric acid, ascorbic acid and acetaminophen, which are commonly found in the blood. Unlike glucose, those compounds are said to be electroactive, which means they generate an electrical signal without the presence of an enzyme.

Glucose by itself doesn’t generate a signal but must first react with the enzyme glucose oxidase. Glucose oxidase is used in commercial diabetes test strips for conventional diabetes meters that measure glucose with a finger pinprick.

The enzyme glucose oxidase is immobilized on a 3D matrix consisting of multilayered graphene petal nanosheets peppered with Pt nanoparticles. Glucose binds within the enzyme pocket producing H2O2, while consuming O2, during electrochemical glucose sensing. As reported on page 3399 by Timothy S. Fisher and co-workers the size, morphology, and density of the Pt nanoparticles are manipulated to enhance sensor performance. Enzymes are enlarged to illustrate functionality.

Source : http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2012/Q3/sensor-detects-glucose-in-saliva-and-tears-for-diabetes-testing.html

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Ford Partners with Medtronic, Others for In-Car Health Management

Ford Partners with Medtronic, Others for In-Car Health Management

Ford Partners with Medtronic, Others for In-Car Health Management

Ford and Healthcare Experts Research SYNC Health and Wellness Connectivity Services Helping Manage Chronic Illness On the Go

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Ford is researching ways for drivers to manage their health in the car, including voice-activating wellness smartphone apps such as Allergy Alert through the SYNC connectivity system.

Ford researchers demonstrate a series of possible in-car health and wellness connectivity services and apps aimed at helping people with chronic illnesses or medical disorders such as diabetes, asthma or allergies manage their condition while on the go

Leveraging Ford SYNC®, researchers developed glucose device connectivity and monitoring capability, location-based allergy and pollen reports and voice-controlled, cloud-based health management services

Ford is working with leading healthcare industry experts such as medical device maker Medtronic, mHealth pioneer WellDoc®, and SDI Health, developers of the informational allergy website www.pollen.com, to develop its initial Health and Wellness connectivity portfolio

Health and Wellness Fact Sheets

DEARBORN, Mich., May 18, 2011 – As Americans take a more active role in managing their health and well-being, Ford researchers are taking a leading role in developing a series of health and wellness in-car connectivity solutions designed to empower people with self-help information while they drive.

Leveraging Ford SYNC® and its ability to connect devices via Bluetooth, access cloud-based Internet services and control smartphone apps, Ford is taking charge in this automotive whitespace area, developing industry-first voice-controlled in-car connections to an array of health aids from glucose monitoring devices, diabetes management services, asthma management tools and Web-based allergen alert solutions.

“Ford SYNC is well known in the industry and with consumers as a successful in-car infotainment system, but we want to broaden the paradigm, transforming SYNC into a tool that can help improve people’s lives as well as the driving experience,” said Paul Mascarenas, chief technology officer and vice president, Ford Research and Innovation.

Healthy statistics

Health of mind, body and spirit is a significant slice of a larger global health and wellness trend that is transcending multiple generations, spectrums and industries. So-called healthy homes, allergen-free cleaners and products, and the cosmetic and bariatric surgery boon, for example, are all converging to create an eclectic mash-up that is redefining health and wellness for today’s consumer.

An underlying consumer demand for being in the know about one’s health while on the go also continues to rise, fueling the growing number and breadth of mobile healthcare devices and health- and fitness-related software and smartphone applications hitting the market today.

According to a recent survey conducted by CTIA-The Wireless Association and Harris Interactive, for example, some 78 percent of U.S. consumers expressed interest in mobile health solutions. A recent study by digital messaging powerhouse MobileStorm further confirmed this phenomenon, indicating that medical and healthcare apps was the third fastest-growing category of smartphone applications in early 2010. The major app stores, such as the Apple App Store, are now housing upward of 17,000 available health apps for download, with nearly 60 percent of those aimed at consumers rather than healthcare professionals, reports mobile research specialist Research2Guidance.

“Wireless health provides an unprecedented ability for monitoring and promotion of health and wellness for all individuals,” said UCLA Electrical Engineering Professor William Kaiser, who has worked with NASA and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate to study how wireless health technologies can be used to track an individual’s fitness and health status and help identify potential risks and challenges. “Studies show wireless health empowers people with information and guidance that can directly address the most important health concerns.

“The new Ford health and wellness connectivity solutions represent a fundamental advancement for these individuals,” Kaiser added, “providing them additional support and functionality during time spent in the vehicle.”

Constant connections

Taking a smart, high-volume approach to bringing mobile health and wellness solutions inside the car, Ford researchers are first looking at two populations with the most need for a constant connection to potentially life-saving medical information – people with diabetes and those with asthma and/or allergies.

According to the American Diabetes Association, nearly 26 million adults and children are currently living with diabetes in the U.S., 3-plus million more than there were four years ago. Numbers grow even higher for those with asthma and allergies, with the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America reporting some 60 million Americans have asthma and/or allergies.

To create relevant in-car features and services for those living with these ailments, Ford is working with experts in these fields, including medical device manufacturers, healthcare management service providers and Web-based medical alert services.

“Ford’s approach to health and wellness in the vehicle is not about trying to take on the role of a healthcare or medical provider, we’re a car company,” said Gary Strumolo, global manager, Interiors, Infotainment, Health & Wellness Research, Ford Research and Innovation. “Our goal is not to interpret the data offered by the experts, but to work with them to develop intelligent ways for Ford vehicles using the power of SYNC. In essence, creating a secondary alert system and alternate outlet for real-time patient coaching services if you will.”

For people with diabetes and their caregivers, constant knowledge and control of glucose levels is critical to avoiding hypoglycemia or low glucose, which can cause confusion, lightheadedness, blurry vision and a host of other symptoms that could be dangerous while driving. Many now depend on a portable continuous glucose monitoring device to track their levels.

Likewise, those with asthma and allergies need to have a clear understanding of their environment and potential symptom triggers – such as pollen levels in the air – that can quickly lead to an attack. Growing in popularity among this group are Web-based alert services and smartphone apps that can help flag dangerous pollen levels based on location.

Ford SYNC offers three unique ways to bring health and wellness connected services into the car:

Device connectivity via Bluetooth – Leveraging Bluetooth, medical devices can be connected to the car to share information through SYNC, just like a driver connects and accesses his or her cellphone and address book by voice control

Cloud-based services – Ford created an off-board network of location-based traffic, directions and information providers that drivers can simply access via their cellphone. Known as SYNC Services, new services such as medical services can be easily added through this plug-and-play voice-controlled capability

AppLink – Ford’s latest SYNC innovation allows smartphone apps to be accessed by drivers via voice control. The SYNC application programming interface (API) allows app developers to enable their apps to communicate through SYNC, delivering a smarter way for drivers to manage apps while driving

The ongoing Ford health and wellness research projects encompassing these needs include:

Glucose monitoring: Working with Medtronic, a leading manufacturer of glucose monitoring devices, Ford researchers have developed a prototype system that allows Ford SYNC to connect via Bluetooth to a Medtronic continuous glucose monitoring device and share glucose levels and trends through audio and a center stack display and provide secondary alerts if levels are too low.

“To address the growing challenge of chronic diseases, Medtronic is collaborating with companies like Ford to develop innovative solutions,” said James Dallas, senior vice president, Medtronic. “Diabetes in particular is a chronic disease where frequent monitoring of blood glucose levels throughout the day is critical. As medical and consumer technologies converge, Medtronic is uniquely positioned to provide patients, caregivers and physicians with actionable insight from the data our devices can gather from the human body. By utilizing information technology and consumer electronic devices, we can help patients actively manage their health via access to real-time data on phones, hand-held devices or even in their cars.”

Allergy alerts: Ford is working with SDI Health and www.pollen.com to SYNC-enable its smartphone Allergy Alert app through AppLink, giving users voice-controlled access to the app that provides location-based day-by-day index levels for pollen; asthma, cold and cough and ultraviolet sensitivity; as well as four-day forecasts.

“Our developers initially created the iPhone app to provide users with greater access to the information they’ve come to rely on from pollen.com,” said Jody Fisher, vice president of Marketing for SDI. “Having instant, portable access for their conditions helps users plan their day or week ahead so they can remain active, which ultimately improves their quality of life.

“Collaborating with Ford is the perfect extension of this objective,” Fisher said. “We are happy to support Ford’s initiative of connecting drivers with resources and services important to their health and wellness.”

WellDoc: Ford and WellDoc, a recognized leader in the emerging field of mHealth integrated services, have joined forces to integrate in-car accessibility to WellDoc’s comprehensive cloud-based personalized solutions for those with asthma and diabetes through SYNC Services. Using voice commands, SYNC users could access and update their WellDoc profile to receive real-time patient coaching, behavioral education and medication adherence support based on their historic and current disease information.

“WellDoc was founded on the concept of helping patients manage their disease with everyday, personal tools that are easy to use and can be easily accessed,” said Dr. Anand K. Iyer, president and COO of WellDoc. “Through our partnership with Ford, we’ve created a unique in-vehicle environment that supports patients so they can continuously maintain their daily routines without interruption.”

Well on the way

Although still in the prototype and research phase, Strumolo acknowledges that many of the health and wellness features and services being explored at Ford have fairly short-term implementation requirements, such as the Allergy Alert app.

Ford is also examining other more long-term health and wellness technologies and ideas related to, for example, heart rate, relaxation and reducing stress. Ford and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have long been studying the correlation between stressors and driving performance, wrapping up a nine-month advanced research project last fall that showed drivers are less stressed when using selected vehicle technologies such as Ford active park assist and cross-traffic alert.

“Health and wellness provides a tremendous opportunity for Ford to provide peace of mind and a personal benefit to drivers and passengers while they are in our vehicles,” said Strumolo. “As more and more devices and technologies lend themselves to such connectivity in the car, it is our responsibility, our philosophy, to examine those possibilities and open our doors to industry relationships that can help us do it intelligently, efficiently and economically.”

###

About Ford Motor Company

Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 166,000 employees and about 70 plants worldwide, the company’s automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford’s products, please visit www.ford.com.

Time has come for when your car not only tells you when it’s low on coolant, but also when you’re low on sugar. In addition to warning you about road construction on the way, how about a notice when you’re entering a high pollen zone? Ford is partnering with a number of medical technology companies to address some health issues relevant to driving. A sudden drop of blood glucose, for example, can force a diabetic to pwzz3vp2 Ford Partners with Medtronic, Others for In Car Health Managementlose consciousness, a particularly dangerous situation when behind the wheel.

By wirelessly linking Medtronic‘s Bluetooth-enabled continuous glucose monitor to Ford’s Sync hands-free entertainment and control system, a driver can receive real-time warnings when glucose levels go out of predefined bounds.

Using WellDoc‘s disease management platform, patients can view and update their profiles including documenting things like asthma attacks, glucose levels, and allergic reactions, all without letting go of the steering wheel. Though maybe it’s best to first pull over and get that inhaler out.

Additionally, drivers will be able to access data from SDI Health‘s Allergy Alert app that can provide local allergy related information as well as some other environmental health indices.

Here’s a demo of the prototype integration of DiabetesManager:

source : http://corporate.ford.com/news-center/press-releases-detail/pr-ford-and-healthcare-experts-34627

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Bacteria-Based Strips for Blood Glucose Monitoring

Bacteria-Based Strips for Blood Glucose Monitoring

Bacteria-Based Strips for Blood Glucose Monitoring

Student team’s glucose sensor uses DNA instead of chemicals

People with diabetes may one day have a less expensive resource for monitoring their blood glucose levels, if research by a group of Missouri University of Science and Technology students becomes reality.

Members of the Missouri S&T chapter of iGEM – the International Genetically Engineered Machine Foundation – recently devised a biological system that uses segments of DNA embedded in bacteria to detect glucose. The students believe their development could lead to a new type of test strip for diabetics.

IGEM-2011-web450.jpg

Biological sciences students Erica Shannon, left, and Amanda Foster are among the members of Missouri S&T’s iGEM chapter. The group developed a biological system to detect glucose levels, a process that could one day help people with diabetes.

“We designed DNA so that bacteria that have DNA would sense a change in osmolarity due to the presence of glucose,” says Erica Shannon of Wildwood, Mo., a senior in biological sciences at Missouri S&T and president of the campus’s iGEM chapter. Osmolarity refers to the concentration of a compound – in this case, glucose – in a solution.

For their project, the students designed genes that allow the bacteria – a non-virulent strain of E. coli – to sense the presence of the simple sugar glucose. The bacteria emit a yellow glow when glucose is present. As glucose concentrations become higher, the glow becomes brighter.

The team developed the system as part of an annual competition sponsored by iGEM, the Americas Regional Jamboree, held Oct. 8-10, 2011, in Indianapolis. S&T’s iGEM chapter received a silver medal for their effort.

According to Shannon, her team’s biological system could form the basis for new, less costly processes to help people with diabetes monitor their blood-sugar levels. It would require replacing the fluorescent gene with one that would cause the bacteria to change color based on glucose levels. This in turn could lead to the development of diabetes blood-test strips that could indicate glucose levels based on various colors. For example, a test strip might turn green if glucose levels are within normal ranges, yellow if borderline and red if elevated.

“All you would have to do is put the DNA inside a bacteria and you’ve got your test strip,” says Shannon.

Bacteria-based test strips would also be less expensive to make than current chemical-based test strips, Shannon says.

“In the future, based on further research, an insulin gene could be added to this system for use in insulin pumps, where specific glucose levels trigger insulin production,” she says.

In addition to Shannon, other members of the iGEM team include:

Amanda Foster of Jefferson City, Mo, a senior in biological sciences and biochemical engineering and chapter vice president.

Blythe Ferriere of Sturgeon, Mo, a junior in chemical engineering and chapter treasurer.

Brice Curtin of St. Louis, Mo, a senior in chemistry and chapter secretary.

Lou Harmon of St. Louis, Mo, a senior in computer science and chapter webmaster.

David Pohlman of Arnold, Mo, a junior in biochemical engineering and chapter lab manager.

Alie Abele of Long Lane, Mo, a sophomore in environmental engineering.

Erica McFarland of Rolla, Mo, a senior in biological sciences.

Hannah Frye of Lee’s Summit, Mo., a biochemistry major.

Beth Wilkins of Rolla, Mo, a junior in biological sciences and chemistry.

Emily Puleo of St. Louis, Mo, a freshman in biochemistry.

Logan Sauerbrei of Lebanon, Mo, a junior in biological sciences.

Chester Gregg of Maryville, Mo, a junior in computer science and physics.

Amber Kreps of St. James, Mo, a senior in biological sciences.

Christy Kwon of Rolla, Mo, a student at Truman State University in Kirksville, Mo.

Gavin Pringle of Cape Girardeau, Mo, a sophomore in computer science.

Tyler Robinson of St. Louis, Mo, a senior in biological sciences.

Thomas Congdon of St. Robert, Mo, a freshman in biological sciences.

The team advisors are Dr. David Westenberg and Dr. Katie Shannon, both associate professors of biological sciences at Missouri S&T.

Normally you wouldn’t want your test strips to get into contact with bacteria; you’d want to store the strips in a safe and clean place. But what if the bacteria were part of the test strip? Students from Missouri Science and Technology have made a system in which they use segments of DNA embedded in bacteria to detect glucose.

The students have used a non-virulent strain of E.coli and put designed genes into the bacteria’s DNA, enabling them to sense the presence of glucose. The bacteria emit a yellow glow if there is glucose and as the glucose concentration rises, the glow becomes brighter. The DNA senses a change in osmolarity due to the presence of glucose.

It could become the basis for a new way to monitor blood glucose levels. The plan is to replace the fluorescent gene with another gene, which would make the bacteria change color based on glucose concentrations. Bacteria based test strips might also be less expensive than chemical based strips, which are currently used. A future step in the development of this system, is to add an insulin gene for use in insulin pumps, where certain glucose levels trigger insulin production.

Source : news.mst.edu/2012/01/student_teams_glucose_sensor_u.html

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