Posts Tagged ‘camera’

Nidek AFC-330 Automated Fundus Camera Cleared in U.S.

Nidek AFC-330 Automated Fundus Camera Cleared in U.S.

Nidek AFC-330 Automated Fundus Camera Cleared in U.S.

FREMONT, Calif. and JACKSONVILLE, Fla., May 15, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — NIDEK, a global leader in the design, manufacturing, and distribution of ophthalmic equipment, announces the FDA 510(k) Clearance for the AFC-330, their most automated fundus camera yet.

A photo accompanying this release is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=12900

“The AFC-330 represents NIDEK’s 3rd generation of automated fundus camera. We are both proud and excited to be leading the way designing and producing fundus cameras that are faster, easier, and more versatile than ever. We anticipate increasing our fundus camera market share with our market expansion with MARCO Ophthalmic.”

Motoki Ozawa, President and CEO of NIDEK

“We couldn’t be more excited about adding the Nidek AFC-330 automated fundus camera to our full product line of diagnostic technologies. The AFC-330 fits perfectly into Marco’s successful model of increasing efficiency with the kind of powerful, easy-to-use, and high-quality instrumentation that our customers have come to expect.”

David Marco, President and CEO of MARCO

The AFC-330 makes quantum leaps improving the operator and patient interface, simplicity, automation, and total practice efficiencies. This camera offers an all in one compact design, auto alignment on the X-Y-Z axis, and a wide range of automated features including auto stereo for Glaucoma Management. The lower flash intensity and sound-dampening internal movements mean less retakes and improved patient comfort. No other Non-Mydriatic camera provides both this level of advanced automation and image quality.

While NIDEK will continue to sell to the Ophthalmology market in the United States, MARCO, the leader in Vision Diagnostics, will sell the NIDEK AFC-330 to the Optometry market. This market expansion is to increase the distribution channels and better serve new and existing customers for both companies.

About NIDEK:

Founded in Gamagori, Japan in 1971, NIDEK continues to be a global leader in research and development, design, manufacture and distribution of ophthalmic equipment. The United States subsidiary based in Silicon Valley, California, provides sales and service for ophthalmic lasers, refractive lasers, and many advanced diagnostic devices.

The Nidek Inc. logo is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/prs/?pkgid=1006

About MARCO:

Founded in Jacksonville, FL, in 1967, MARCO continues to expand its position as ‘The Leader in Vision Diagnostics’ with a product line that encompasses classical lane equipment and NIDEK high-tech, automated refractive and retinal instrumentation. MARCO continues to provide unparalleled training and support to its expanding United States customer base.

Features

All in one with built-in camera and computer

Five automated functions for enhanced ease-of-use

Monitor and indicator for operator assist

Navigation of stereo and panorama photography

Low flash intensity and quiet shutter sound

NIDEK (Gamagori, Japan) has received FDA clearance to market its AFC-330 fundus camera in the U.S. The unit is an all-in-one system that contains both the camera and the processing computer, negating the need for another machine to remain nearby.

The device is the company’s most automated model, and features automatic alignment along the three axis, uses a lower brightness flash, and has dampened mechanical components, among other advances.

More details about the AFC-330 from the product page:

All in one with built-in camera and computer

The AFC-330 has an integrated CCD camera and microcomputer in one compact unit without requiring an external camera and PC. It is virtually “ready to use out of the box”.

Five automated functions for enhanced ease-of-use

With five automated functions – 3-D auto tracking, auto focus, auto switching from anterior eye to fundus, auto shot, and auto print / export – the AFC-330 enables seamless photography from start to finish.

Monitor and indicator for operator assist

The anterior eye monitor allows an operator to constantly verify alignment. The focus split indicator shows the amount of focus deviation in the fundus observation screen.

Navigation of stereo and panorama photography

The AFC-330 navigates stereo and panorama photography with target marks displayed on observation screen.

Low flash intensity and quiet shutter sound

The AFC-330 reduces flash intensity by 40% and sound of the shutter by 50% compared to its predecessor, the AFC-230 / 210.

Source : http://www.globenewswire.com/newsroom/news.html?d=256233

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Hyperspectral Imaging Coming to Medical Applications

Hyperspectral Imaging Coming to Medical Applications

Hyperspectral Imaging Coming to Medical Applications

A powerful color-based imaging technique is making the jump from remote sensing to the operating room—and a team of scientists* at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have taken steps to ensure it performs as well when discerning oxygen-depleted tissues and cancer cells in the body as it does with oil spills in the ocean.

microarrayer

Microarrayer machines (A) now can mix colors and deposit them on microscope slides, which can be used to calibrate hyperspectral imagers (HSI) for use in medical applications. The finished slides can be custom-colored (B) to calibrate HSIs to find specific types of tumors or disease tissue. Close up, they resemble dot-matrix printwork (C).

Credit: Clarke/NIST

View hi-resolution image

The technique, called hyperspectral imaging (HSI), has frequently been used in satellites because of its superior ability to identify objects by color. While many other visual surveying methods can scan only for a single color, HSI is able to distinguish the full color spectrum in each pixel, which allows it to perceive the unique color “signatures” of individual objects. Well-calibrated HSI sensors have been able to discern problems from diseases in coral reefs to pollution in the atmosphere as determined by the distinct spectral signature at a location.

“Because diseased tissues and cells also have distinct spectra, scientists have been trying to use HSI for medical applications as well,” says NIST physicist Jeeseong Hwang. “But any time you tell a machine to scan for something, you need to be sure it is actually looking for what you want, and you have to make sure that the image analysis algorithm extracts the correct color information out of a complex multicolor data set. We decided to create a way to calibrate an HSI device and to test its algorithm as well.”

Matthew Clarke, a former National Research Council-supported postdoctoral fellow in Hwang’s group who is currently working in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., wrote new software for a device called a microarrayer, so named because it is capable of laying down hundreds of tiny sample droplets in specific places on a microscope slide’s surface. Normally a microarrayer creates DNA arrays for genetic research, but the team remade it into an artistic tool, programming it to select chemicals of different hues and lay them down on the slide’s surface.

The results, which look a bit like dot-matrix printing, can be used to calibrate medical HSI devices and image analysis algorithms. When combined with HSI in a medical imaging application, this effort could allow a surgeon to look for cells with a specific chemical makeup, as determined by the cells’ color.

“Scientists and engineers can create a custom slide with the exact colors representing the chemical makeup they want the HSI devices to detect,” Hwang says. “It could be a good way to make sure the HSI devices for medical imaging perform correctly so that surgeons are able to see all of a tumor or diseased tissue when operating on a patient.”

This project is part of a larger effort to evaluate and validate optical medical imaging devices, led by the NIST team members, David Allen, Maritoni Litorja, Antonio Possolo, Eric Shirley and Jeeseong Hwang. Hwang adds that the special issue** of Biomedical Optics Express in which the team’s findings appear is the output of a recent NIST-supported international workshop on the topic.

*M.L. Clarke, J.Y. Lee, D.V. Samarov, D.W. Allen, M. Litorja, R. Nossal and J. Hwang. Designing microarray phantoms for hyperspectral imaging validation. Biomedical Optics Express, Vol. 3(6), pp. 1291-1299 (June 2012), doi: 10.1364/BOE.3.001300.

The design and fabrication of custom-tailored microarrays for use as phantoms in the characterization of hyperspectral imaging systems is described. Corresponding analysis methods for biologically relevant samples are also discussed. An image-based phantom design was used to program a microarrayer robot to print prescribed mixtures of dyes onto microscope slides. The resulting arrays were imaged by a hyperspectral imaging microscope. The shape of the spots results in significant scattering signals, which can be used to test image analysis algorithms. Separation of the scattering signals allowed elucidation of individual dye spectra. In addition, spectral fitting of the absorbance spectra of complex dye mixtures was performed in order to determine local dye concentrations. Such microarray phantoms provide a robust testing platform for comparisons of hyperspectral imaging acquisition and analysis methods.

Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a technique that analyzes a wide spectrum of light coming into a camera. Instead of assigning individual pixels to primary colors (usually red, green, and blue), the light coming into individual pixels is broken down into many more bands, providing more information of what’s being observed. Hyperspectral imaging has particularly been useful for satellites monitoring the environment on Earth, but now researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are working on bringing this technology to image the human body for disease.

Until now the problem has been calibrating an HSI device so that it spots the specific color signature of whatever is being looked for. The NIST team developed a method, which uses something called a microarrayer, to do this calibration by depositing substances that have the precise color they’re looking for and calibrating the HSI device against that.

More info from NIST’s press release:

“Because diseased tissues and cells also have distinct spectra, scientists have been trying to use HSI for medical applications as well,” says NIST physicist Jeeseong Hwang. “But any time you tell a machine to scan for something, you need to be sure it is actually looking for what you want, and you have to make sure that the image analysis algorithm extracts the correct color information out of a complex multicolor data set. We decided to create a way to calibrate an HSI device and to test its algorithm as well.”

Matthew Clarke, a former National Research Council-supported postdoctoral fellow in Hwang’s group who is currently working in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., wrote new software for a device called a microarrayer, so named because it is capable of laying down hundreds of tiny sample droplets in specific places on a microscope slide’s surface. Normally a microarrayer creates DNA arrays for genetic research, but the team remade it into an artistic tool, programming it to select chemicals of different hues and lay them down on the slide’s surface.

The results, which look a bit like dot-matrix printing, can be used to calibrate medical HSI devices and image analysis algorithms. When combined with HSI in a medical imaging application, this effort could allow a surgeon to look for cells with a specific chemical makeup, as determined by the cells’ color.

Source : http://www.nist.gov/pml/div682/hsi-061212.cfm

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