Posts Tagged ‘Devices’

Philips DirectLife Activity Monitor at TEDMED

Philips DirectLife Activity Monitor at TEDMED

Philips DirectLife Activity Monitor at TEDMED

People across the US are breaking down personal barriers, getting active and fit with DirectLife. Read their stories of success.

An example: “The Direct Life Program has really made me very aware of keeping healthy and fit. In the past I would only get exercise once or twice a week but now I make sure that I do something active every day!”

With DirectLife, you can make small changes to bad habits – changes that help you find a more active lifestyle – and stay more active for the long term.

The slow, step-by-step program starts by tracking how much you move every day. We’ll help you set goals and track your progress. We’ll make suggestions about how to increase your activity levels at your own pace, and provide you a personal coach who can help you stay motivated. It’s a program you can stick to for the long term, because it’s custom built for you.

Last week at TEDMED, Philips was giving away their DirectLife devices that monitor person’s daily activity using a built-in accelerometer. In a crowded room at the conference, we spoke to one of the representatives of Philips to find out what the product is all about:

Source : http://www.directlife.philips.com/

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Accuray’s New TomoTherapy H Series of Radiation Oncology Devices

Accuray’s New TomoTherapy H Series of Radiation Oncology Devices

Accuray’s New TomoTherapy H Series of Radiation Oncology Devices

SUNNYVALE, Calif. and ASTRO 2012 (Boston), October 28, 2012 – Accuray Incorporated (Nasdaq: ARAY), the premier radiation oncology company, today launched its new TomoTherapy® H™ Series, featuring the TomoHDA™ System, with faster planning, faster delivery and increased quality. The TomoHDA System was unveiled at the 54th Annual American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Meeting in Boston. Key features of the TomoHDA System include:

Accuray’s new TomoEDGE™ dynamic jaws technology provides users with added flexibility in treatment delivery by sharpening dose fall off and accuracy. In many cases the use of TomoEDGE for head and neck tumors and prostate cancer treatments has resulted in the reduction of beam-on time by half. With the TomoHDA™ System this new technology is standard and can be applied to both TomoHelical™ and TomoDirect™ treatment modes for 3DCRT and IMRT deliveries.

The high-performance VoLO™ Technology – an enhancement to the TomoTherapy® treatment planning system – leverages the new dose calculation algorithm and advanced graphics processing technology to increase clinical efficiency, throughput and flexibility in developing both simple and the most complex radiation therapy plans.

“We are committed to our TomoTherapy customers and continue to innovate to provide the most advanced treatments in radiation oncology with the goal of improving patient care,” said Joshua H. Levine, president and chief executive officer of Accuray. “The new TomoTherapy H™ Series offers treatment solutions for the entire spectrum of radiation therapy. It will enable unprecedented speed and efficiency ensuring the highest quality of care from the routine to the most complex cases.”

The TomoHDA System is a fully-integrated 3D image-guided, full spectrum radiation therapy system and builds upon the proven TomoTherapy Hi-Art® and TomoHD™ technologies. The TomoHDA System offers multiple new benefits including performance enhancements, unrivaled dose distributions and faster treatments.

The TomoHDA System is part of the new TomoTherapy H Series. Included in this series of products, is the new TomoH™ System, the gold standard for image-guided IMRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy) treatment, providing streamlined 3D CT daily image guidance and ultrafast MLC (multileaf collimator) modulation, enabling the delivery of the dose to achieve excellent target homogeneity while sparing surrounding healthy tissue. Also included in the series is the TomoHD™ System – including TomoDirect – a full spectrum solution that provides high quality treatments to every patient for any clinical indication requiring radiotherapy.

The new TomoEDGE™ dynamic jaws are capable of sharpening the dose and allow customers to treat more patients with the TomoTherapy System. The jaws are optimized to sweep across the target, minimizing dose to healthy tissue and critical structures adjacent to the target and opening to the desired maximum size to reduce treatment time. The result is a balanced treatment delivery that is as unique as each patient.

Using the high-performance VoLO Technology, the TomoHDA™ system allows ultra fast creation of highly conformal treatment plans with the flexibility to design a personalized treatment plan specific to the individual needs of each patient. For example, the application of VoLO technology on breast cancer treatment plans has been shown to reduce dose calculation and treatment planning optimization time to as few as three minutes. TomoHDA also includes a fan-beam computed tomography (CT) system capable of producing images 50 percent faster, facilitating improved patient re-positioning time and therefore less overall time for the patient to be on the treatment couch.

“Having been involved in the creation of and research collaboration for the new TomoEDGE, we have seen firsthand that this is one of the most versatile radiation therapy treatment options available,” said PD Dr. Florian Sterzing, M.D., Consultant Radiation Oncologist at University Clinic of Heidelberg. “The new functionality enables improved quality of radiotherapy application and allows us to treat even more cancer patients.”

The TomoHDA System also includes Citrix®-based remote planning with web-based review capabilities, providing the ultimate flexibility for clinicians to develop and approve treatment plans from virtual workstations.

“TomoTherapy’s ability to treat the full range of disease sites, including even the most complex tumors, makes it an invaluable resource for cancer patients,” said Wade Gebara, M.D. Chief of Radiation Oncology at Berkshire Medical Center, Pittsfield, Mass. “With increased speed and reliability, the new TomoTherapy System will provide the opportunity for more patients to benefit from this personalized technology.”

Also on display in Accuray’s ASTRO booth (#7101) is the CyberKnife M6 FIM Sytem – part of the CyberKnife® M6™ Series – which is pending FDA 510(k) clearance and not yet available for commercial distribution in the United States. The new CyberKnife M6 FIM and FM Systems feature the InCise™ Multileaf Collimator, which combines the benefits of beam shaping with the flexibility of non-isocentric, non-coplanar delivery. The new InCise Multileaf Collimator (MLC) was designed specifically for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments, giving the system the capability to extend its radiosurgical precision into a broader field of applications. The system is intended to treat large and irregular tumors more efficiently with excellent dose gradients, to expand the number of patients eligible for treatment.

Researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia – who compared treatment plans created with a theoretical MLC on the CyberKnife System to those created originally with the CyberKnife Iris™ Collimator and conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) plans – found that an MLC mounted on a robotic arm could potentially offer numerous clinical benefits, including faster treatment delivery, better target coverage and a sharper dose fall off could be achieved than a typical gantry- based IMRT plan or previous CyberKnife treatments. The Fox Chase researchers demonstrated the potential to create treatment plans that would spare critical structures around tumors better with a robotically mounted MLC, providing the ability to treat tumors using a higher dose without increasing the normal tissue toxicity.

Dates, times and locations of ASTRO clinical presentations featuring the CyberKnife and TomoTherapy Systems are available here.

About Accuray

Accuray Incorporated (Nasdaq: ARAY), based in Sunnyvale, Calif., is the premier radiation oncology company that develops, manufactures and sells personalized innovative treatment solutions that set the standard of care, with the aim of helping patients live longer, better lives. The Company’s leading edge technologies – the CyberKnife and TomoTherapy Systems – are designed to deliver radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiation therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, image guided radiation therapy, and adaptive radiation therapy. To date 642 systems have been installed in leading hospitals around the world. For more information, please visit www.accuray.com.

Safe Harbor Statement

Statements made in this press release that are not statements of historical fact are forward-looking statements and are subject to the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements in this press release relate, but are not limited, to expansion of the Company’s global presence, quality of treatments, accuracy, dose delivery, clinical efficiency, continual innovation, pending regulatory clearance, treatment times, dose sculpting, and the Company’s leadership position in radiation oncology innovation. Forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations, including risks detailed from time to time under the heading “Risk Factors” in the company’s report on Form 10-K filed on September 10, 2012. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date the statements are made and are based on information available to the Company at the time those statements are made and/or management’s good faith belief as of that time with respect to future events. The Company assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect actual performance or results, changes in assumptions or changes in other factors affecting forward-looking information, except to the extent required by applicable securities laws. Accordingly, investors should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements.

The TomoTherapy® System, the premier solution for the entire spectrum of radiation therapy — that delivers dose only where you need it — now with outstanding speed, performance and simplicity — allowing you the freedom to choose the very best treatment for each of your patients, with confidence and without compromise.

Created to make personalized treatments an option for radiation therapy, the TomoTherapy H Series offers interactive planning and efficient delivery of highly sculpted doses for personalized and consistent treatments. Seamless daily CT image guidance provides precise patient positioning, margin reduction and adaptive planning and enables pinpoint dose accuracy for every radiation therapy patient.

Clinical Excellence

Treats a full spectrum of radiotherapy patients without compromise

Enables planning and delivery of highly sculpted dose distributions

Patient Focus

Facilitates seamless daily CT image guidance for precise patient positioning, margin reduction and adaptive planning

Provides personalized and consistent treatments for every patient

Spares more normal tissue, helping to reduce side effects

Economic Impact

Schedule your radiation therapy patients in conventional time slots

Fast and flexible treatment planning for each individual patient

Automated quality assurance

The TomoTherapy H Series

The TomoHDA™ System – the ultimate flexibility in treatment delivery with unrivaled dose conformality, faster patient treatments, and faster concurrent treatment planning. It grants every patient access to high quality treatment

TomoEDGE™ spares more normal tissue while enabling increased throughput —with unprecedented quality

High performance VoLO™ planning provides flexibility, speed, efficiency and interactivity for concurrent treatment planning

Expand your practice by efficiently treating patients that are difficult to treat with conventional radiation therapy equipment

The TomoHD™ System – the full spectrum solution for any Radiation Oncology center, providing high quality treatments to every patient for any clinical indication requiring radiotherapy

TomoHelical™ and TomoDirect™ modalities to enable delivery of individualized treatments for both routine and complex indications

VoLO planning provides the ultimate in flexibility, speed and efficiency with real time interactive planning

The clinical solution when accuracy, flexibility and efficiency cannot be compromised

The TomoH™ System – the gold standard for image guided IMRT treatment delivery maximizes both conformality and target dose uniformity

CTrue™ image guidance provides daily 3D CT target localization and enables margin reduction while sparing healthy tissue

Ultra-fast binary MLC enables unprecedented intensity modulation

Excellent target homogeneity while sparing more normal healthy tissue

Accuray launched its new TomoTherapy H Series line of radiation oncology devices, headlined by the 3D image guided TomoHDA System with TomoEDGE technology. TomoEDGE optimizes radiation delivery by sharpening the affected edge between the target tumor and healthy tissue.

Accuray TomoTherapy H Series table Accurays New TomoTherapy H Series of Radiation Oncology Devices (VIDEO)

The company’s VoLO technology takes into account the new radiation dose delivery pattern into its calculations when doing graphic analysis in preparing treatment plans.

The three devices in the TomoTherapy H Series:

The TomoHDA™ System – the ultimate flexibility in treatment delivery with unrivaled dose conformality, faster patient treatments, and faster concurrent treatment planning. It grants everypatient access to high quality treatment

TomoEDGE™ spares more normal tissue while enabling increased throughput —with unprecedented quality

High performance VoLO™ planning provides flexibility, speed, efficiency and interactivity for concurrent treatment planning

Expand your practice by efficiently treating patients that are difficult to treat with conventional radiation therapy equipment

The TomoHD™ System- the full spectrum solution for any Radiation Oncology center, providing high quality treatments to every patient for any clinical indication requiring radiotherapy

TomoHelical™ and TomoDirect™ modalities to enable delivery of individualized treatments for both routine and complex indications

VoLO planning provides the ultimate in flexibility, speed and efficiency with real time interactive planning

The clinical solution when accuracy, flexibility and efficiency cannot be compromised

The TomoH™ System- the gold standard for image guided IMRT treatment delivery maximizes both conformality and target dose uniformity

CTrue™ image guidance provides daily 3D CT target localization and enables margin reduction while sparing healthy tissue

Ultra-fast binary MLC enables unprecedented intensity modulation

Excellent target homogeneity while sparing more normal healthy tissue

Source : http://www.accuray.com/media/press-releases/accuray-launches-new-tomotherapy%C2%AE-h%E2%84%A2-series-featuring-tomoedge%E2%84%A2

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Dissolvable “Transient Electronics” Will Be Good For Your Body and the Environment

Dissolvable “Transient Electronics” Will Be Good For Your Body and the Environment

Dissolvable “Transient Electronics” Will Be Good For Your Body and the Environment

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Physicians and environmentalists alike could soon be using a new class of electronic devices: small, robust and high performance, yet also biocompatible and capable of dissolving completely in water – or in bodily fluids.

additional photo

VIDEO: Engineering professor John Rogers explains how biodegradable electronics technology works. | Photo credit: Beckman Institute, University of Illinois and Tufts University

Researchers at the University of Illinois, in collaboration with Tufts University and Northwestern University, have demonstrated a new type of biodegradable electronics technology that could introduce new design paradigms for medical implants, environmental monitors and consumer devices.

“We refer to this type of technology as transient electronics,” said John A. Rogers, the Lee J. Flory-Founder Professor of Engineering at the U. of I., who led the multidisciplinary research team. “From the earliest days of the electronics industry, a key design goal has been to build devices that last forever – with completely stable performance. But if you think about the opposite possibility – devices that are engineered to physically disappear in a controlled and programmed manner – then other, completely different kinds of application opportunities open up.”

Three application areas appear particularly promising. First are medical implants that perform important diagnostic or therapeutic functions for a useful amount of time and then simply dissolve and resorb in the body. Second are environmental monitors, such as wireless sensors that are dispersed after a chemical spill, that degrade over time to eliminate any ecological impact. Third are consumer electronic systems or sub-components that are compostable, to reduce electronic waste streams generated by devices that are frequently upgraded, such as cellphones or other portable devices.

Transient electronic systems harness and extend various techniques that the Rogers’ group has developed over the years for making tiny, yet high performance electronic systems out of ultrathin sheets of silicon. In transient applications, the sheets are so thin that they completely dissolve in a few days when immersed in biofluids. Together with soluble conductors and dielectrics, based on magnesium and magnesium oxide, these materials provide a complete palette for a wide range of electronic components, sensors, wireless transmission systems and more.

SIDEBAR: Want to know more?

The team has built transient transistors, diodes, wireless power coils, temperature and strain sensors, photodetectors, solar cells, radio oscillators and antennas, and even simple digital cameras. All of the materials are biocompatible and, because they are extraordinarily thin, they can dissolve in even minute volumes of water.

The researchers encapsulate the devices in silk. The structure of the silk determines its rate of dissolution – from minutes, to days, weeks or, potentially, years.

“The different applications that we are considering require different operating time frames,” Rogers said. “A medical implant that is designed to deal with potential infections from surgical site incisions is only needed for a couple of weeks. But for a consumer electronic device, you’d want it to stick around at least for a year or two. The ability to use materials science to engineer those time frames becomes a critical aspect in design.”

Since the group uses silicon, the industry standard material for integrated circuits, they can make highly sophisticated devices in ways that exploit well-established designs by introducing just a few additional tricks in layout, manufacturing and supporting materials. As reported in the Sept. 28 issue of the journal Science, the researchers have already demonstrated several system-level devices, including a fully transient 64-pixel digital camera and an implantable applique designed to monitor and prevent bacterial infection at surgical incisions, successfully demonstrated in rats.

Next, the researchers are further refining these and other devices for specific applications, conducting more animal tests, and working with a semiconductor foundry to explore high-volume manufacturing possibilities.

“It’s a new concept, so there are lots of opportunities, many of which we probably have not even identified yet” Rogers said. “We’re very excited. These findings open up entirely new areas of application, and associated directions for research in electronics.”

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency supported this work. The Tufts University team was led by Fiorenzo Omenetto; the Northwestern University team was led by Youggang Huang. Rogers is affiliated with the departments of materials science and engineering, of chemistry, of mechanical science and engineering, of bioengineering and of electrical and computer engineering, and with the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the U. of I.

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass.–Tiny, fully biocompatible electronic devices that are able to dissolve harmlessly into their surroundings after functioning for a precise amount of time have been created by a research team led by biomedical engineers at Tufts University in collaboration with researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Dubbed “transient electronics,” the new class of silk-silicon devices promises a generation of medical implants that never need surgical removal, as well as environmental monitors and consumer electronics that can become compost rather than trash.

“These devices are the polar opposite of conventional electronics whose integrated circuits are designed for long-term physical and electronic stability,” says Fiorenzo Omenetto, professor of biomedical engineering at Tufts School of Engineering and a senior and corresponding author on the paper “A Physically Transient Form of Silicon Electronics” published in the September 28, 2012, issue of Science.

“Transient electronics offer robust performance comparable to current devices but they will fully resorb into their environment at a prescribed time—ranging from minutes to years, depending on the application,” Omenetto explains. “Imagine the environmental benefits if cell phones, for example, could just dissolve instead of languishing in landfills for years.”

The futuristic devices incorporate the stuff of conventional integrated circuits — silicon and magnesium — but in an ultrathin form that is then encapsulated in silk protein.

“While silicon may appear to be impermeable, eventually it dissolves in water,” says Omenetto. The challenge, he notes, is to make the electrical components dissolve in minutes rather than eons.

Researchers led by UIUC’s John Rogers — the other senior and corresponding author — are pioneers in the engineering of ultrathin flexible electronic components. Only a few tens of nanometers thick, these tiny circuits, from transistors to interconnects, readily dissolve in a small amount of water, or body fluid, and are harmlessly resorbed, or assimilated. Controlling materials at these scales makes it possible to fine-tune how long it takes the devices to dissolve.

Device dissolution is further controlled by sheets of silk protein in which the electronics are supported and encapsulated. Extracted from silkworm cocoons, silk protein is one of the strongest, most robust materials known. It’s also fully biodegradable and biofriendly and is already used for some medical applications. Omenetto and his Tufts colleagues have discovered how to adjust the properties of silk so that it degrades at a wide range of intervals.

The researchers successfully demonstrated the new platform by testing a thermal device designed to monitor and prevent post-surgical infection (demonstrated in a rat model) and also created a 64 pixel digital camera.

Collaborating with Omenetto from Tufts Department of Biomedical Engineering were Hu Tao, research assistant professor and co-first author on the paper; Mark A. Brenckle, doctoral student; Bruce Panilaitis, program administrator; Miaomiao Yang, doctoral student; and David L. Kaplan, Stern Family Professor of Engineering and department chair. In addition to Tufts and UIUC, co-authors on the paper also came from Seoul National University, Northwestern University, Dalian University of Technology (China), Nano Terra (Boston), and the University of Arizona.

In the future, the researchers envision more complex devices that could be adjustable in real time or responsive to changes in their environment, such as chemistry, light or pressure.

The work was supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the National Science Foundation, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Multi University Research Initiative program, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of Health under award EB002520 and the U.S. Department of Energy.

A copy of the paper is available at scipak@aaas.org.

Tufts University School of Engineering Located on Tufts’ Medford/Somerville campus, the School of Engineering offers a rigorous engineering education in a unique environment that blends the intellectual and technological resources of a world-class research university with the strengths of a top-ranked liberal arts college. Close partnerships with Tufts’ excellent undergraduate, graduate and professional schools, coupled with a long tradition of collaboration, provide a strong platform for interdisciplinary education and scholarship. The School of Engineering’s mission is to educate engineers committed to the innovative and ethical application of science and technology in addressing the most pressing societal needs, to develop and nurture twenty-first century leadership qualities in its students, faculty, and alumni, and to create and disseminate transformational new knowledge and technologies that further the well-being and sustainability of society in such cross-cutting areas as human health, environmental sustainability, alternative energy, and the human-technology interface.

EVANSTON, Ill. — An interdisciplinary team of researchers from Northwestern University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Tufts University are the first to demonstrate “transient electronics” — which are electronics that gradually disappear on a specified schedule, whether it be a few days or six months.

These kinds of electronics could have applications in medicine, pharmaceuticals, environmental monitors and the military, among other uses.

Conventional electronics are made to last indefinitely. Transient electronics, on the other hand, offer the opposite behavior. They physically vanish over time in a well-controlled manner and at a prescribed time, dissolving when they react with water. A magnesium oxide encapsulation layer and silk overcoat envelops the electronics, and the thickness determines how long the system will take to disappear into its environment.

“These electronics are there when you need them, and after they’ve served their purpose they disappear,” said Yonggang Huang, who led the Northwestern portion of the research focused on theory, design and modeling. “This is a completely new concept.”

The novel technology opens up important possibilities. Transient electronics could be useful as medical devices implanted inside the human body to monitor such things as temperature or brain, heart and muscle tissue activity, to apply thermal therapy or to deliver drugs. When no longer needed, the electronics would be fully absorbed by the body with no adverse effects. (Implantable electronics are not commonly used in medicine because of concern about the long-term effects.)

Such a system also could be used as environmental monitors placed on buildings, roadways or military equipment to detect temperature change or structural deformation. The device would dissolve when exposed to water, eliminating the need for it to be recovered at a future date.

Details of the biocompatible electronics will be published in the Sept. 28 issue of the journal Science.

“We selected materials familiar to the human body, such as magnesium,” said Huang, a senior author of the paper and the Joseph Cummings Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Mechanical Engineering at Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science. “We didn’t want to use a material the body has no experience with.”

While the researchers studied a number of different biocompatible materials, including zinc and iron, they focused on silicon-based electronics with conductors made of magnesium. The key question they needed to answer was: How long will it take the entire electronic device to dissolve?

The device is made up of the electronics and encapsulation layers (a magnesium oxide layer covered by a silk overcoat) surrounding the electronics. The encapsulation layers are the first to dissolve and dictate the first dissolution timescale. The magnesium electrodes in the electronics define the second timescale. These combined lengths of time determine the dissolution time for the entire system.

John Rogers, the Lee J. Flory-Founder professor of engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, led the overall multidisciplinary research team and the U. of I. group that worked on the experimental and fabrication work of the transient electronics.

Huang and his Northwestern team developed a model that can accurately predict how thick the encapsulation layers need to be for a specific dissolution time. The model was tested against experimental evidence, and the two agreed each time. (With a reliable model, the researchers don’t need to keep repeating experiments.)

At Tufts, Fiorenzo G. Omenetto, professor of biomedical engineering, led the biomaterials and chemistry work and conducted a series of in vivo experiments to demonstrate bio-resorption and biocompatibility.

In the study, the researchers built several functional devices that are dissolvable, including field-effect transistors, resistors, diodes, a heater and a strain sensor. All the components of each electronic system disappear, and right on the programmed schedule.

The researchers demonstrated that the transient electronics, including heater, sensor and power supply, can operate in both water and a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) liquid. (PBS is very chemically similar to what is in the human body.) They also implanted the transient electronics in a mouse model and showed that the heating device was effective and could kill bacteria.

Induction coils provide a wireless power supply to the electronics. “This way the devices in water or PBS liquid can have power without being physically connected to a power source, such as a battery,” Huang said.

The materials tested by the researchers are biocompatible, which is important for implantable electronics. Magnesium is an element found in the body, and the material also is used in some stents. Silk is approved for sutures and in tissue engineering. Other materials studied, such as magnesium oxide and porous silicon, also are biocompatible.

The materials, fabrication techniques and modeling tools can be used for component devices for almost any type of transient electronic system, the researchers said.

The work on materials, integration schemes, manufacturing approaches and design strategies was supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The theoretical analysis and associated experiments were supported by the National Science Foundation. The animal studies were funded by the National Institutes of Health.

A remarkable feature of modern silicon electronics is its ability to remain physically invariant, almost indefinitely for practical purposes. Although this characteristic is a hallmark of applications of integrated circuits that exist today, there might be opportunities for systems that offer the opposite behavior, such as implantable devices that function for medically useful time frames but then completely disappear via resorption by the body. We report a set of materials, manufacturing schemes, device components, and theoretical design tools for a silicon-based complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology that has this type of transient behavior, together with integrated sensors, actuators, power supply systems, and wireless control strategies. An implantable transient device that acts as a programmable nonantibiotic bacteriocide provides a system-level example.

Source : http://news.illinois.edu/news/12/0927transient_electronics_JohnRogers.html

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Thieme Debuts Proprietary eBook App for iPad

Thieme Debuts Proprietary eBook App for iPad

Thieme Debuts Proprietary eBook App for iPad

Description

Thieme Bookshelf is the companion app to Thieme’s E-Book Store, where you can purchase from among hundreds of books specializing in the latest medical content. Browse the contents of the store or your personal library with an easy-to-use bookshelf; tap a book to open it; flip through pages with a swipe or a tap; and bookmark or add notes

Medical publisher Thieme recently debuted their own free iBooks-like app for the iPad. This is an interesting way for medical publishers to start their own eco-systems, allowing institutional and personal subscriptions that don’t rely on a single platform. Already accessible through their web portal, in the future they could expand to Android tablets or whatever else comes along. It doesn’t anchor users to Apple, but it does keep them with Thieme, and prevents the end user from selling a used copy. Like with most electronic media, users want to access their purchases with whatever device they happen to have on hand, and since most physicians are using an iPad for a tablet, Thieme seems to be responding appropriately.

The app itself is pretty basic, serving as both a bookshelf and a portal to their eBook store, but we don’t know that you would want it to do much more. It downloads purchased books through the storefront in the app, or when you sign in with your Thieme username you get access to all of the eBook versions of Thieme books you already own on other devices. The files are saved on the iPad, so you don’t need internet access once the book is downloaded. We looked at three titles that Thieme provided free for review:

Thieme bookshelf Thieme Debuts Proprietary eBook App for iPadAtlas of Anatomy

Peripheral Regional Anesthesia

Surgical Treatment of Orthopaedic Trauma

Within each book you can make bookmarks and notes, search for keywords, and alter the screen contrast. However, when a book comes with “bonus content” such as videos or DVDs there is no way to get to them within the app. The publishers tell us that they hope to add this functionality in the future. Also, there is no way to share notes or bookmarks with others who own the same book or with yourself on another device. Annoyingly, if you leave a book to go to another part of the app, when you return to the book the program does not save your place, dumping you back to the first page. This is made even more frustrating by the slowness of the app in rendering each page. We were using the latest generation iPad and it took about 3 seconds to render each page (slightly faster in landscape mode, but the text is smaller), making casual scrolling through a book very tedious. So unless you remember the exact page number you were on before exiting or made a bookmark, getting back to where you were could involve a lot of idle time.

Thieme book page Thieme Debuts Proprietary eBook App for iPad

A final minor complaint is that the title of the app itself (Thieme Bookshelf) is long enough that it has to be truncated by the iOS homescreen, so it displays as “Thieme…kshelf” when downloaded.

This sounds like a lot of complaining, but overall we like what Thieme is attempting to do. And it is definitely more convenient to carry around an iPad than three heavy books. If you already have an eBook license from Thieme for multiple books, this free app is worth downloading to your iPad, but the limitations listed above mean that if you only have a small pocket guide, it is more convenient to just carry the physical version. Especially if it is something you want to be able to access quickly and flip through to find relevant info.

Source : http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/thieme-bookshelf/id509171227

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Cameron Health’s Leadless Implatable Cardiac Defibrillator Looking to Get FDA Approval

Cameron Health’s Leadless Implatable Cardiac Defibrillator Looking to Get FDA Approval

Cameron Health’s Leadless Implatable Cardiac Defibrillator Looking to Get FDA Approval

Cameron Health’s S-ICD® System Scheduled for FDA Panel Review on April 26, 2012

World’s Only Completely Subcutaneous Implantable Defibrillator is an Important New Alternative for Patients at Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. (March 19, 2012) – Cameron Health, Inc. (“Cameron Health”) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Circulatory System Devices Panel will review the Premarket Approval (PMA) application of the S-ICD® System on April 26, 2012.

“The FDA advisory committee meeting represents a significant step towards obtaining U.S. approval of the S-ICD System,” said Kevin Hykes, Cameron Health’s President and CEO. “We look forward to the opportunity to discuss the safety and efficacy of the S-ICD System with the FDA review team. Our clinical data will demonstrate that the S-ICD System is a valuable new treatment option for patients at risk of sudden cardiac arrest.”

The FDA advisory panel will review clinical data on the safety and efficacy of the S-ICD System including the results of a Pivotal IDE Clinical Study of 330 patients at risk of SCA. The PMA application was submitted to the FDA in December, 2011.

On March 8, 2012, Boston Scientific Corporation announced that it would exercise its option to acquire Cameron Health, Inc. Closing of the transaction is subject to customary conditions, including relevant antitrust clearance, and is expected to occur in the second or third quarter of 2012.

About the S-ICD System

The S-ICD System is unique in that the implantation of the system is entirely subcutaneous, removing the need for lead placement inside the heart. Essentially, the S-ICD System eliminates the major clinical complications associated with transvenous leads. The S-ICD System detects highly accelerated and disorganized heart rhythms caused by ventricular arrhythmias that can lead to sudden cardiac arrest. When abnormal arrhythmias are detected, the S-ICD System delivers an 80 Joule shock to restore the heart’s normal rhythm. Left unaddressed, these disorganized heart rhythms are often fatal.

About Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)

SCA is a sudden, abrupt loss of heart function. Most SCA episodes are caused by the rapid and/or chaotic activity of the heart known as Ventricular Tachycardia or Ventricular Fibrillation. Recent estimates show that approximately 850,000 people in the U.S. are at risk of SCA and indicated for an ICD device, but remain unprotected. In fact, less than 35 percent of patients who are indicated for an ICD receive one. SCA is not the same as a heart attack. A heart attack is a malfunction caused by blockage in a vessel that supplies blood to the heart, which may permanently damage part of the heart. Unlike SCA, most people survive a first heart attack. SCA is an “electrical” malfunction of the heart that results in no blood flow to the body or the brain. SCA is fatal if left untreated. ICDs are proven to be 98 percent effective in treating dangerous heart rhythms that can lead to SCA.

Cameron Health Inc.’s novel defibrillator used to shock a stopped heart has been tied to inappropriate shocks and infection rates, U.S. regulators said.

A study of the San Clemente, California-based company’s device in 314 patients showed 48 episodes of shocks in 38 patients that were inappropriate and higher infection rates compared with devices with leads inserted through a vein, according to a report released today by Food and Drug Administration staff. Advisers to the agency are scheduled to meet April 26 to discuss the device’s safety and effectiveness.

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Boston Scientific Corp. (BSX) agreed in March to purchase closely held Cameron Health for as much as $1.35 billion for the device called the S-ICD System. Boston Scientific fell 1.4 percent to $5.86 at the close in New York. The FDA staff also questioned whether the Cameron Health data is sufficient to assure the device works.

“FDA has raised several questions regarding the totality of the safety and effectiveness data submitted,” agency staff wrote.

Cameron Health also is working with the FDA to understand the root cause of premature battery depletion in the device. The FDA won’t consider approval until the issue is resolved, according to the report. The panel won’t weigh the battery issue.

Ward Dykstra, a spokesman for the company, didn’t immediately return a phone call requesting comment on the staff report.

No Wires

Cameron Health’s defibrillator, approved in Europe, is implanted completely under the skin, eliminating the need for lead placement inside the heart, the company said. About 850,000 people in the U.S. are at risk for sudden cardiac arrest, which is rapid or chaotic heart activity that leads to loss of function, and are eligible to use an implantable defibrillator, according to the company.

In the study of the Cameron Health device, most of the shocks deemed inappropriate were from oversensing, according to the FDA staff report. Twenty inappropriate shocks represented normal device function and were consistent with what would occur with a defibrillator inserted in a vein.

Cameron Health (San Clemente, CA), which was purchased in March by Boston Scientific, is reporting that the FDA’s Circulatory System Devices Panel has recommended approval for its S-ICD system, an implantable defibrillator that unlike traditional ones does not use intracardiac leads. Instead, an electrode implanted vertically under the skin on the chest senses the heart’s electrical signals and corrects them with appropriate shocks.

Though the recommendation for approval points to a likely final clearance of the device by the US FDA, the latest study of the S-ICD system did show it generates more unnecessary shocks, leads to more infections, and loses battery life faster than traditional ICDs. According to Bloomberg wire’s Apr 23, 2012 article, “Cameron Health also is working with the FDA to understand the root cause of premature battery depletion in the device. The FDA won’t consider approval until the issue is resolved, according to the report. The panel won’t weigh the battery issue.”

Source : http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-04-23/cameron-health-s-defibrillator-raises-safety-concerns.html

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