Posts Tagged ‘Healthcare’

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Ansell introduces GAMMEX N95 Respirator and Surgical Mask

Ansell introduces GAMMEX N95 Respirator and Surgical Mask

Ansell, a global leader in protection solutions today announced the latest addition to its Active Infection Protection (AIP) portfolio, the GAMMEX N95 Respirator and Surgical Mask, extending the AIP range beyond surgical gloves. This new mask is the first to utilize a hybrid technology that incorporates the comfort of a standard surgical mask with the protection of a respirator. The mask is designed to more comfortably protect healthcare workers and patients from harmful airborne pathogens, therefore reducing the risk of Healthcare Associated Infection (HAI).

The GAMMEX N95 Respirator and Surgical Mask filters out 95% of airborne particles down to 0.1 micron in size, exceeding the worldwide standard for respirators of 0.3 microns set by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), US FDA, and Health Canada. This allows the mask to remove many airborne particles contained in surgical smoke and filter out 99.9% of airborne viruses and bacterial microorganisms. Its high filtration capability, combined with TYPE II fluid resistance, makes the new GAMMEX N95 Respirator and Surgical Mask a critical component in personal protection for Infection Control, Isolation, ICU, ER, OR and many other areas subject to airborne pathogens and harmful particles.

The GAMMEX N95 Respirator and Surgical Mask is designed for unrivalled comfort and performance. Its patented Breathable Face Seal allows air to circulate through the top, bottom and sides of the respirator, ensuring maximum breathability. The unique design feels lighter and cooler so it can be worn comfortably for longer periods of time, promoting compliance and further enhancing infection prevention.

“This addition to the Ansell Active Infection Protection portfolio, coupled with our antimicrobial surgical gloves and a series of products currently in our pipeline, demonstrates our commitment to delivering clinically relevant solutions in infection prevention to help in the fight against healthcare associated infections,” said Anthony B. Lopez, President and General Business Manager, Ansell Medical Solutions.

“In line with our focus on innovation, the GAMMEX N95 Respirator and Surgical Mask provides a unique technological solution, specialized for the demands of the healthcare environment where exposure to airborne pathogens is high,” he continued.

The GAMMEX brand offers the most innovative and technologically advanced solutions worldwide, protecting against external aggression, allergic reactions and microbial contamination in the perioperative environment. The GAMMEX N95 Respirator and Surgical Mask is now available for sale in North America, with global rollout to follow in 2013.

Source : http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121203/Ansell-introduces-GAMMEX-N95-Respirator-and-Surgical-Mask.aspx

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Philips Healthcare, UH to showcase latest medical technology at Cleveland Medical Mart

Philips Healthcare, UH to showcase latest medical technology at Cleveland Medical Mart

University Hospitals (UH) and Philips Healthcare are among a group of global leaders in healthcare to showcase the latest medical technology at the new Cleveland Medical Mart & Convention Center. The two organizations will collaborate to highlight innovative imaging technology in use and in development by Philips and other Ohio biomedical companies.

Scheduled to open in July 2013, the $465 million Cleveland Medical Mart & Convention Center is a one million-square-foot campus located in the heart of downtown Cleveland. The space occupied by UH and Philips will anchor the building’s third floor, which is dedicated to “clinical spaces.”

The showcase at the Cleveland Medical Mart is an outgrowth of the Philips Healthcare Global Advanced Imaging Innovation Center, a collaboration between Philips and UH, along with Case Western Reserve University, which brings together scientists and physicians to test and evaluate new imaging technologies. Through the $38.5 million Center, established in 2010, the latest Philips Healthcare imaging equipment is brought to UH Case Medical Center for development, validation of clinical efficacy and product release.

“The Medical Mart showcase will further establish Cleveland as an international hub for imaging technology by highlighting the latest equipment that we have co-developed with Philips right here in Northeast Ohio,” said Thomas F. Zenty III, CEO of University Hospitals. “The synergy between our organizations has created a pipeline to move innovative technologies more quickly into patient care.

We look forward to showcasing the important work that has come out of the Philips Healthcare Global Advanced Imaging Innovation Center to the Cleveland Medical Mart’s visitors, while enhancing the rich heritage and distinctive capability of Northeast Ohio healthcare.”

The Department of Radiology at UH Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University, led by Pablo Ros, MD, Professor and Chairman, is home to a number of the nation’s leaders in radiology who partner with Philips, which has one of its North American largest manufacturing headquarters in Cleveland. The announcement comes in conjunction with the Radiological Society of North America annual meeting in Chicago, where Philips will display some of the equipment that will be in the Cleveland Medical Mart showcase.

“We are very excited to join the Cleveland Medical Mart with our partners at the nationally renowned University Hospitals Case Medical Center,” said Dominic Smith, Vice President, Global Computed Tomography at Philips. “Our company aspires to assist clinicians by providing breakthrough imaging technologies that today are not yet possible. The Philips Healthcare Global Advanced Imaging Innovation Center has helped us realize these objectives and in the process, help improve the healthcare of patients in Ohio and throughout the world.”

The four-story Cleveland Medical Mart will serve health and health care innovation, education, and commerce through state-of-the-art spaces, programs, and virtual offerings while building on and enhancing the rich heritage and distinctive capability of Northeast Ohio healthcare. Visitors will come to see state-of-the-art medical technologies in use, without having to go into the care or research setting itself.

“Congratulations to both University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Philips Healthcare for being the first Medical Mart collaborative partnership between a commercial enterprise and a leading healthcare provider,” said Cuyahoga County Executive Ed FitzGerald. “This is yet another positive and visible step forward for the Cleveland Medical Mart project.”

source : http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121127/Philips-Healthcare-UH-to-showcase-latest-medical-technology-at-Cleveland-Medical-Mart.aspx

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Watson Goes to Medical School: Interview with Cleveland Clinic’s James Stoller

Watson Goes to Medical School: Interview with Cleveland Clinic’s James Stoller

Watson Goes to Medical School: Interview with Cleveland Clinic’s James Stoller

A lot can happen in 22 months. That’s how long it’s been since IBM‘s Watson captured the public’s imagination by routing its human opponents in Jeopardy!. Since then we’ve seen Watson make inroads into healthcare through partnerships with speech recognition company Nuance and the insurance giant WellPoint. Like a proud parent, most recently IBM has sent Watson off to medical school by partnering with the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. Unlike its human counterparts, Watson will likely be able to “graduate” faster given that it can process about 500 gigabytes – or 1 million books – per second.

We had the opportunity to speak with Dr. James Stoller, Director of the Education Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, about the collaboration.

Shiv Gaglani, Medgadget: How did the partnership between Cleveland Clinic and IBM get started?

James Stoller Watson Goes to Medical School: Interview with Cleveland Clinics James StollerDr. James Stoller: Following Watson’s success in Jeopardy, IBM decided that one of their next steps was to apply the natural language platform to healthcare. They systematically reviewed potential partners and ultimately approached us at the Cleveland Clinic with the offer to collaborate. Their enthusiasm was predicated on the fact that the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner College of Medicine teaches medicine through a completely problem-based approach, which is how they envision Watson learning. Our students learn through small-group sessions in which there are eight students per group. A case is presented and the students need to do research to validate or refute their hypotheses – just as Watson had to do during Jeopardy. There is a good alignment between the technological underpinnings of Watson and the approach to learning and teaching that is core to the Cleveland Clinic.

Medgadget: What does Watson “going to medical school” entail? Will he be reading actual patient notes, studying for the USMLE, etc?

Stoller: These details are still emerging, but we imagine that Waston will be an active participant in the small group problem-based learning sessions. Through inferential strings from the presented case, Watson may synthesize information and present diagnostic possibilities to the students. The students can then take a deep dive and interrogate lines of evidence through which the hypotheses were developed. If Watson presents an implausible hypothesis or has flawed reasoning, the students and instructors can correct it and in turn improve Watson’s future performance. In this way students and Watson will be learning from each other.

The questions that Watson will learn from will not only come from our problem-cased cases. We also expect Watson to take the USMLE Step 1 exam, which features short clinical scenarios, to see how it performs.

IBM Watson on Jeopardy Watson Goes to Medical School: Interview with Cleveland Clinics James Stoller

Medgadget: But he’ll ruin the curve!

Stoller: That’s likely, haha.

Medgadget: When will Cleveland Clinic and IBM know that Watson is ready to “graduate”? What metrics will be used?

Stoller: That’s a good question. Graduation, in a sense, is an arbitrary phenomenon. When you graduate from medical school that does not mean you are finished learning – indeed your journey has just begun. Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner School of Medicine was designed a decade ago from first principles to help our students develop reflexes for lifelong learning, because what they learn today will be out of date in 5-6 years.

Similarly, it is imperative that Watson be a continuous learner. Fortunately for Watson, it will probably be easier to stay on top of the latest medical research and guidelines than it is for humans.

Medgadget: What types of interactions will Watson have with CC’s students and faculty?

Stoller: Watson will definitely be part of our problem-based learning groups, though we have not yet decided exactly how it will be deployed. There’s a lot of excitement among the students and faculty. We also imagine faculty designing a number of research studies, such as a controlled experiment where we look at acceleration of student learning with or without Watson. We envision that the opportunity to help develop and study Watson will not only be available to people at the College of Medicine, but also to others throughout the Cleveland Clinic.

Medgadget: After IBM’s interest in applying Watson to healthcare was made public, many in the community expressed concern that the platform would replace clinicians, beginning with fields based on pattern recognition (e.g. pathology, radiology, etc). Are there similar concerns now at the Cleveland Clinic?

Stoller: Watson is being developed as a bedside clinical support making, not a replacement for specific medical fields. Complex clinical decisions at the bedside have to integrate medical knowledge with patient preferences and situational awareness. I don’t think a decision support system will replace the human ability to match preferences with recommendations. This being said, Watson will hopefully provide the encyclopedic knowledge and support so that the clinician can make an optimal decision – call it a “capable sidekick.” Clinicians will still play an integral and irreplaceable role in the delivery of care.

Medgadget: What is your background in medical education or technology?

Stoller: I serve as chair of Cleveland Clinic’s Education Institute, which comprises 16 departments and many talented people who are focused on all of the stakeholders in medical education: medical students, nursing students, residents, CME, allied health providers, etc. The Watson collaboration is the effort of a large team, of which I am only one member, perhaps the “chief cheerleader.” Fortunately I’m surrounded by colleagues who are highly technically skilled and interested in education.

In terms of my own background, apart from being a pulmonary/critical care doctor, I have a master’s degree in organizational development and am reasonably tuned in to how teams form and work. I combine this perspective with a focus on education to make sure that the Education Institute makes progress towards improving medical education, as we hope to do with our collaboration with IBM.

To learn more about the collaboration between IBM and the Cleveland Clinic, check out this short video:

Source : http://watson-goes-to-medical-school-interview-with-cleveland-clinics-james-stoller.html

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Nicadex Device May Become Part of Formal Smoking Cessation Therapy

Nicadex Device May Become Part of Formal Smoking Cessation Therapy

Nicadex Device May Become Part of Formal Smoking Cessation Therapy

Electronic cigarettes have become a big business as many smokers have opted to choose them over the traditional variety. Lack of actual smoke and tar is a major positive, but being able to “smoke” them even where smoking is not allowed may lead to a greater overall intake of nicotine. Nevertheless, many people bought e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation tool that takes away some of the habit forming qualities of real cigarettes while keeping the ever-addictive nicotine.

CN Creative, Ltd. out of Manchester, UK has raised £2 million ($3.1 million) to help bring to market its Nicadex electronic inhaler for nicotine replacement therapy. The device, which delivers vaporized pharmaceutical-grade nicotine, looks to be very much like a typical e-cigarette, but will undergo clinical trials and is planned to be used as a part of a wider smoking cessation therapy approach.

From the press release:

Nicadex is similar in concept to the electronic cigarettes currently marketed to adult consumers by CN Creative and others, but with several key differences.

First, Nicadex will be tested in clinical trials and then submitted for regulatory review under the process used for other prescription NRT products, initially through the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and then through the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory agencies.

Second, CNC intends to market the Nicadex electronic inhaler as a medically supervised NRT designed to reduce the harm caused by smoking and to help smokers quit as part of a comprehensive smoking cessation programme.

Third, the Nicadex electronic inhaler has been specially engineered and will be manufactured in the UK under the same stringent standards used for regulated medical products, and the pharmaceutical-grade nicotine solution it uses is being produced by CNC in its own UK-based cGMP facilities approved for the manufacture of prescription drugs.

Nicadex is a hand-held device that delivers purified nicotine to the user through the vaporisation of a pharmaceutical-grade solution of nicotine. A rechargeable lithium battery powers the vaporiser that instantly turns the nicotine solution into a vapour that is inhaled by the user. Many users report that the sensation of using the Nicadex device is similar to smoking, but the vapour contains no smoke and none of the carbon monoxide, tar or thousands of toxic impurities that make smoking tobacco products so damaging to health. In addition, since there is no smoke, there are no smoke by-products that can cause “second-hand” harm to others.

source : http://www.cncbio.co.uk/product-services/nicadex/

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Kaiser Permanente Makes Electronic Medical Records Accessible to Patients

Kaiser Permanente Makes Electronic Medical Records Accessible to Patients

Kaiser Permanente Makes Electronic Medical Records Accessible to Patients Through Android App and Mobile Website

Nearly 9 Million Kaiser Permanente Health Records Securely Available on Mobile Devices

Patient information securely available with a touch of a finger with new app and mobile-optimized kp.org

OAKLAND, Calif. — Kaiser Permanente already has the largest electronic medical record system in the world. Today, the health care organization announced that 9 million Kaiser Permanente patients now can easily access their own medical information anywhere in the world on mobile devices through a mobile-optimized website.

Nearly 9 Million Kaiser Permanente Health Records Securely Available on Mobile Devices

Kaiser Permanente has released a new app for Android devices, and users of other mobile devices, including the iPhone, can also get full access to that information from the Kaiser Permanente health record system with the mobile-optimized version of kp.org. An additional app for iPhone will be released in the coming months, but iPhone users can easily download a shortcut icon onto their home screens that will take them directly to the mobile-friendly kp.org with a touch of the finger.

Kaiser Permanente has led the health care world in providing online access to information for its patients. In 2011 alone, more than 68 million lab test results were made available online to Kaiser Permanente patients. The mobile-optimized site and the new app make that information, and much more, securely available at members’ fingertips.

Kaiser Permanente patients will have 24/7 access to lab results, diagnostic information, direct and secure email access to their doctors, and will also be able to order prescription refills. Kaiser Permanente patients have been able to email their doctors for five years, with more than 12 million e-visits in 2011 alone. Kaiser Permanente expects that number to increase significantly with the new app and mobile-optimized site.

The Android app is available now in the Android Market at no charge. Users of other mobile devices can access the same set of care-support tools at no charge through the new secure, mobile-optimized member website, which is available through smart-phone Internet browsers.

With the new offering, Kaiser Permanente patients have 24/7 access from their mobile devices to view their secure personal health record, email their doctors, schedule appointments, refill prescriptions and locate Kaiser Permanente medical facilities. Members who have the ability to act on behalf of a family member on kp.org now can accomplish the same tasks. Those caring for an elderly parent or someone with a chronic condition can now more easily check lab results, refill prescriptions and communicate with the doctor’s office on behalf of the patient.

“This is the future of health care. Health care needs to be connected to be all that it can be. This new level of connectivity is happening real time, and it is happening on a larger scale than anything like it in the world,” said George Halvorson, chairman and chief executive officer of Kaiser Permanente. “The fact that a Kaiser Permanente patient in an emergency room in Paris or Tokyo can simply pull out their mobile device and have immediate and current access to their own medical information is an evolutionary and revolutionary breakthrough for medical connectivity.”

“Our members love our current connectivity tools,” said Christine Paige, senior vice president of marketing and Internet services. “Now we will extend our entire connectivity tool kit for patients through a mobile phone. Our mobile-optimized site and app take connectivity to the next level by making the mobile experience easy and enjoyable. We believe that convenience, paired with a great user experience, will meet members’ needs and will ultimately result in improved health and patient-physician relationships.”

iPHONE SHORTCUT ICON

Go to kp.org on your iPhone mobile Web browser

Click on the middle icon at the bottom of your screen

Choose “Add to Home Screen”

A short cut will be added to your iPhone icons

Members using the Android app have access to their kp.org accounts by touching the app icon on their phones. Those visiting kp.org from a mobile phone Internet browser are seamlessly redirected to the mobile-optimized website, which was designed for optimal viewing on a mobile-phone screen. In both cases, a streamlined menu of mobile-optimized features helps members find what they need quickly and easily with minimal taps.

“Providing our patients with clear and convenient access to their health information is a step forward in connectivity and improving the health care experience for patients, no matter where they are,” said Jack Cochran, MD, executive director of The Permanente Federation. “We already have complete connectivity among Kaiser Permanente care sites through Kaiser Permanente HealthConnect®. This new level of connectivity extends the reach of information to our patients in a more convenient and user-friendly format. This new app and mobile-optimized site is very good for patient care and will revolutionize connectivity by bringing health care for the first time to the level of connectivity other parts of our economy have achieved.”

Users’ personal health information is safe and secure while using the new app and the mobile-friendly kp.org, which employ the same security safeguards that protect patient information on the traditional kp.org website, including secure sign-on and automatic sign-out after a period of inactivity.

“The benefits of mobile extend beyond member engagement,” said Philip Fasano, executive vice president and chief information officer of Kaiser Permanente. “Mobile solutions can have a positive impact on health. Health care, itself, will be much more convenient for many people. The mobile-friendly site and app are also a springboard for new innovations that will inspire members to be aware of their health and take steps to improve it.”

The Pew Internet Project reported that 40 percent of American adults access the Internet via their mobile phones, and in some cases, mobile phones are their primary source of Internet access. Twenty-five percent of smart-phone owners go online primarily using their phone; of these, roughly one-third have no high-speed home broadband connection.

“There has been an explosion in the growth of mobile devices and users are looking for new and improved ways to manage their lives online,” Halvorson said. “It is time to make health information easily accessible from mobile devices.”

“Edelman’s 2011 Health Barometer reported that 68 percent of those who use digital tools to manage or track their health believed it helped them improve their health,” Paige said. “Nearly 80 percent of kp.org users agreed that the website helps them stay healthy. The tools and services available on kp.org are even more powerful in the palm of your hand.”

This is a major new connectivity offering, but it is not Kaiser Permanente’s first mobile app. Other, more targeted tools, were released earlier. Kaiser Permanente launched its first mobile application, KP Locator for iPhone, in July 2011. The facility-finder app has been downloaded 42,000 times. KP Locator combines the power of kp.org’s robust facility directory and the iPhone’s GPS capabilities to make searching for Kaiser Permanente facilities fast and easy for patients on the go. It answers three of the most basic, but vital, user questions thoroughly and simply — where are the Kaiser Permanente locations close to me, how can I contact and get to them, and what departments and services can I access there? Kaiser Permanente also released its Every Body Walk! app two months ago to help encourage people to walk and maintain healthy activity levels, and that app was rated No. 5 in the Top 100 Green Apps by Eco-Libris.

Kaiser Permanente is known for its leadership in the use of health information technology. The Kaiser Permanente electronic health record is the largest non-governmental medical record system in the world. KP HealthConnect enables all of Kaiser Permanente’s nearly 16,000 physicians to electronically access the medical records of all 8.9 million Kaiser Permanente members nationwide and serves as a model for other care systems. Kaiser Permanente has received numerous awards for its health IT expertise, including four 2011 eHealthcare Leadership Awards. You can learn more about how patients, clinicians and researchers are using My Health Manager and KP HealthConnect by checking out Kaiser Permanente’s YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/kaiserpermanenteorg. Kaiser Permanente also has what might be the world’s most complete electronic medical library to support its caregivers by providing convenient access to the best and most current medical science. That electronic medical library is for internal use only.

About Kaiser Permanente

Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, our mission is to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We serve approximately 8.9 million members in nine states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to: www.kp.org/newscenter.

Kaiser Permanente, the largest managed care organization in the United States, has unveiled an Android app and mobile-optimized website through which its 9 million patients can access their own medical information anywhere in the world on their mobile devices. The app and mobile website contain the same information and possibilities that were already available through kp.org, i.e. lab results, diagnostic information, secure email access to doctors, ordering of prescription refills, scheduling appointments and locating of healthcare facilities. It is also possible for family members to get access on behalf of a patient and accomplish the same tasks.

The Android app is available for free from the Android market. An iPhone app will be released in the coming months, but for now iPhone users will have to do with the mobile website.

Source : http://xnet.kp.org/newscenter/pressreleases/nat/2012/012412kporgmobileoptimized.html

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Griffin AirStrap Med Keeps Your iPad Clean of Blood and Other Bodily Fluids

Griffin AirStrap Med Keeps Your iPad Clean of Blood and Other Bodily Fluids

Griffin AirStrap Med Keeps Your iPad Clean of Blood and Other Bodily Fluids

Nashville, TN – June 12, 2012 – Griffin Technology, one of the world’s foremost creators of innovations for everyday life, is excited to announce a new addition to their Business Solutions lineup: AirStrap Med, a sanitizable case for iPad designed for easy use by medical personnel while caring for patients.

Spyglass Consulting Group’s new report, “Point of Care Computing for Physicians 2012,” reveals that 80 percent of physicians surveyed believe that Apple’s iPad tablet will be a positive player in healthcare in the future, particularly as software developers optimize their clinical applications for use on the iPad. Spyglass conducted phone interviews with more than 100 doctors in acute and ambulatory care in the United States from July to October 2011.

“AirStrap Med is the lightest, most versatile case we’ve ever designed, and it allows full control of the iPad’s amazing Multi-Touch screen even while wearing latex or nitrile gloves,” said J. Curtis, Griffin’s Director of B2B Product Development. “We aim to help healthcare professionals focus on patient care while implementing the latest technology.”

Compatible with iPad 2 and the new 3rd generation iPad, AirStrap Med allows doctors and nurses to easily hold an iPad in one hand while they use it to view medical records, apps, x-rays and more. AirStrap Med was developed in collaboration with physicians and nurses to adapt the convenience of Griffin’s original AirStrap case to the demanding and specialized needs of the healthcare environment.

A combination of ABS and TPE plastics, AirStrap Med is constructed as a lightweight, two-piece frame with built-in screen shield that closes securely around the tablet, sealing it, front, back, sides, and touchscreen, from moisture and fluids. An adjustable shoulder strap allows users to carry the iPad with their hands free for other tasks. The case’s non-porous, non-slip surfaces are fully sanitizable with industry-standard cleaning and sterilization products. Both shoulder strap and hand strap are detachable for easy cleaning, and can be adjusted to accommodate right- and left-handed users.

The AirStrap Med is available now for $89.99 at store.griffintechnology.com/airstrap-med-case.

For more information about Griffin’s Business Solutions, visit www.griffintechnology.com/business.

About Griffin Technology

Founded on Paul Griffin’s kitchen table in 1992, Griffin Technology Inc., is today one of the world’s foremost creators of accessories for home, mobile, and personal technology. Unique products such as iTrip®, PowerMate®, iFM®, iMic® and Evolve® Wireless Speaker System have broken new ground in consumer electronics and created loyal fans the world over. Today, Griffin products are conceived, designed and developed in-house and continue to push the envelope of the industry they helped create. Learn more about Griffin’s entire range of ingenious designs at www.griffintechnology.com, www.facebook.com/griffintech and on Twitter, @griffintech.

Developed with input from physicians and nurses from across the U.S.

AirStrap Med brings the convenience and security of Griffin’s AirStrap case to the demanding environment of healthcare settings.

AirStrap Med is designed to make using iPad 2 and iPad (3rd gen.) in healthcare settings easier, safer and more comfortable. Using the wide, comfortable hand strap on the back of the case, it’s much easier to hold the iPad with with one hand during rounds, charting and other on-the-go activities.

The lightweight, two-piece polycarbonate and TPE frame snaps securely around your iPad, sealing it against moisture and fluid intrusion on all sides. Non-slip surfaces give a positive grip whether the user is bare-handed or wearing gloves. AirStrap Med covers your iPad’s Multi-Touch display by a touch-through screen protector shield that resists fingerprints and scratches. iPad’s Home button and volume controls remain accessible.

Smooth non-porous surfaces are fully sanitizable with industry-standard cleaning and sterilization products.

A molded-in clip secures your stylus when not in use. Included detachable hand and shoulder straps securely clip onto reinforced points on the frame but can be quickly removed for cleaning.

Griffin has released the AirStrap Med, an iPad case especially for the healthcare environment. The AirStrap Med was developed in collaboration with physicians and nurses, adapting Griffin’s existing AirStrap case to the specialized needs of hospital environments.

The case is fully sanitizable and the iPad can be controlled, if needed, one-handed while wearing latex or nitrile gloves.

A combination of ABS and TPE plastics, AirStrap Med is constructed as a lightweight, two-piece frame with built-in screen shield that closes securely around the tablet, sealing it, front, back, sides, and touchscreen, from moisture and fluids. An adjustable shoulder strap allows users to carry the iPad with their hands free for other tasks. The case’s non-porous, non-slip surfaces are fully sanitizable with industry-standard cleaning and sterilization products. Both shoulder strap and hand strap are detachable for easy cleaning, and can be adjusted to accommodate right- and left-handed users.

On the back, the AirStrap Med features a molded-in clip that secures a stylus. It is compatible with the iPad 2 and the new 3rd generation iPad. The Airstrip Med is available from Griffin for $89.99.

Source : http://www.griffintechnology.com/press/release/griffin-announces-availability-airstrap-med-case-ipad-designed-input-medical-professio

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Neuro PBV IR from Siemens Monitors Intracranial Parenchymal Blood Flows

Neuro PBV IR from Siemens Monitors Intracranial Parenchymal Blood Flows

Neuro PBV IR from Siemens Monitors Intracranial Parenchymal Blood Flows

New functional imaging for interventional neuroradiology:

syngo Neuro PBV IR displays cerebral blood flow during interventional procedures

With syngo Neuro PBV IR (Parenchymal Blood Volume, Interventional Suite), Siemens

Healthcare has developed a new application for interventional radiology that allows you to

review parenchymal blood flow during minimally invasive interventions in the brain for the

first time. This feature assists the neuroradiologist in the treatment of stroke patients by

displaying the condition of the cerebral tissue directly in the angio suite. syngo Neuro PBV

IR further expands the Siemens imaging application portfolio for Artis zee, the Siemens

systems for interventional radiology and cardiology.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), approximately 15 million people suffer from

stroke every year. A stroke results from decreased blood flow in the brain, which frequently causes

irreparable damage of the cerebral tissue. The earlier a stroke is treated, the larger the chance that

as little brain tissue as possible is destroyed. To further shorten the time from diagnosis to

treatment, Siemens Healthcare has developed the software syngo Neuro PBV IR, which directly

displays the status of the cerebral tissue during minimally invasive procedures. Minimally invasive

techniques for stroke treatment involve the use of a thin catheter within the arteries of the brain to

either deliver a drug to dissolve the blood clot or a special catheter to mechanically remove it.

Syngo Neuro PBV IR for the first time provides neuroradiologists with current information about the

status of the brain tissue during minimally invasive procedures. This not only results in clinical

advantages for stroke treatment, but is equally helpful for tumor biopsy and treatment, tissue

embolization, and vasospasm therapy (spasms of blood vessels).

Another benefit of the new Siemens software is that it is capable of providing blood volume data for

the whole brain, unlike traditional CT acquisition, and allows the clinician to review the information

from any orientation, axial, coronal, sagittal etc. Syngo Neuro PBV IR uses cone-beam CT

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Siemens AG

Corporate Communications and Government Affairs

Wittelsbacherplatz 2, 80333 Munich

Germany

Information number: HIM201002.023e fp

Media Relations: Marion Bludszuweit

Phone: +49 9131 84-3292

E-mail: marion.bludszuweit@siemens.com

Siemens AG

Healthcare Sector – IM Division

Henkestr. 127, 91052 Erlangen

technology (syngo DynaCT) to acquire the information required for such advanced tissue

visualization. This proprietary Siemens development from 2004 led to a paradigm shift in

angiographic imaging, introducing the ability to view cross sectional soft tissue information with an

angiographic C-arm system for the first time.

All that is required to generate the PBV information is two C-arm rotations around the patient and a

steady state contrast injection. The sophisticated processing algorithms of the system use the

resulting data to generate a neurological PBV map. The information is available at tableside, in

less than 40 seconds, without the need for any further user interaction.

Syngo Neuro PBV IR further expands the Siemens imaging application portfolio for Artis zee. Artis

zee is the product family name of Siemens systems used for interventional radiology and

cardiology. These systems are available in biplane, multi-axial, ceiling-mounted, floor-mounted,

and multi-functional configurations.

Syngo Neuro PBV IR is the second functional imaging application for the Artis zee portfolio after

the successful launch of syngo iFlow. The application syngo iFlow allows for the display of the

functional information inherent in a digital subtraction angiography (DSA) series in a single color

image.Syngo Neuro PBV IR was first introduced to the public at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the

Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Images can be found at:

http://www.siemens.com/med-picture/syngo-Neuro-PBV-IR

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world’s largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter in

medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics, medical information technology and hearing aids. Siemens offers its customers

products and solutions for the entire range of patient care from a single source – from prevention and early detection to

diagnosis, and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows for the most common diseases, Siemens

also makes healthcare faster, better and more cost-effective. Siemens Healthcare employs some 48,000 employees

worldwide and operates around the world. In fiscal year 2009 (to September 30), the Sector posted revenue of 11.9

billion euros and profit of around 1.5 billion euros. For further information please visit: www.siemens.com/healthcare.

Siemens has just announced the release of the Neuro PBV IR computed tomography suite that provides a live look of inracranial blood flows for neuroradiologists performing clot lyses, stent placements, ablations, etc.

With syngo Neuro PBV IR (Parenchymal Blood Volume, Interventional Suite), Siemens Healthcare has developed a new application for interventional radiology that allows you to review parenchymal blood flow during minimally invasive interventions in the brain for the first time. This feature assists the neuroradiologist in the treatment of stroke patients by displaying the condition of the cerebral tissue directly in the angio suite.

This not only results in clinical advantages for stroke treatment, but is equally helpful for tumor biopsy and treatment, tissue embolization, and vasospasm therapy (spasms of blood vessels).

Another benefit of the new Siemens software is that it is capable of providing blood volume data for the whole brain, unlike traditional CT acquisition, and allows the clinician to review the information from any orientation, axial, coronal, sagittal etc. Syngo Neuro PBV IR uses cone-beam CT technology (syngo DynaCT) to acquire the information required for such advanced tissue visualization.

All that is required to generate the PBV information is two C-arm rotations around the patient and a steady state contrast injection. The sophisticated processing algorithms of the system use the resulting data to generate a neurological PBV map. The information is available at tableside, in less than 40 seconds, without the need for any further user interaction.

Source : http://www.siemens.com/press/pool/de/pressemitteilungen/2010/imaging_it/HIM201002023e.pdf

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Crohnology Distills Data from Patient Experiences with Crohn’s Disease

Crohnology Distills Data from Patient Experiences with Crohn’s Disease

Crohnology Distills Data from Patient Experiences with Crohn’s Disease

One year ago, I placed a stake in the ground. I decided I could no longer passively accept the current state of the healthcare system without doing something about it. I decided to quit my job and dedicate myself to producing a software network that gives unprecedented power and health information directly to patients, via a system of patient-to-patient sharing modeled after Wikipedia.

Many doctors, providers, and those in the healthcare industry told me that what I was doing was dangerous. That it wouldn’t work out. That patients don’t know what they are talking about. That medicine should be left in the hands of the “experts”. And that, at best, patient anecdotes about their experiences with treatments were “cute”.

From having an incurable immune condition called Crohn’s for 13 years, I saw things differently. I told them that I believe our current medical system has it upside-down. I believe patients are the most valuable part of their care. I believe they walk around with great silos of knowledge and information that is of uncountable value to the medical system and to other patients. And, from my experience, I know these silos go completely untapped.

It is necessary for us to be connected to find a cure.

Exchanging Treatment Experiences at the SF Crohn’s & Colitis Meetup Group

Patients with chronic conditions literally go through 99.999% of their lives outside of the doctor’s office, but that data from them living with and treating their condition is effectively swept aside—it’s “anecdotal” after all. Patients experiment with alternative treatments like diets, supplements, or activities, and learn whether they work or not. But the system doesn’t support upstreaming of that data. That data just gets lost. Leaving newly diagnosed patients to start at square one, relearning things many patients have learned before. I think that system doesn’t make any sense.

One thing I learned is that if I had listened to the traditional thinkers who repeatedly told me “no”—to those people who told me that patient-to-patient healthcare is “crazy”, “dangerous”, or blasphemous—I would never have gotten this far. I would not have a wall full of printed emails from patients all over the globe telling me that Crohnology has already made a huge difference in their lives.

Oftentimes I’m finding that hearing “no” means you’re doing something right.

Another thing I learned is that if you’re willing to bet everything on something radical you truly believe in, people will come help you out. For me, one of those people is Dr. Larry Chu, at Stanford. When I shared with him my vision and the software I had developed, he told me that he wanted to spread this message to the world. He produced the video embedded at the top of this blog post, which paints my story more vividly than I could ever have hoped to do on my own. (If you find it helpful, I’d love you to share it with your friends to help spread the message to patients across the globe.)

Crohnology at the Berkeley Skydeck, beside UC Berkeley’s campus

The other amazing thing about Dr. Chu is that he is the producer of the Stanford Medicine X Conference. He believes in the patient revolution—that is, that patients should no longer be disempowered and instead should be empowered to rise up and take control of their health. Patients should have access to their data, and they should be able to share that data with others. And most of all, their experiences and voice should play an integral part in their care and the search for answers.

This year, Dr. Chu is doing something completely unprecedented. As the producer of the upcoming Stanford Medicine X Conference, he is giving away 10% of the seats to patients themselves, in the form of scholarships (regular registration is $1,199). The deadline for submitting these scholarship applications is in just two days, Thursday. If you consider yourself an empowered patient, please apply (if you’re accepted, I look forward to seeing you there!)

It seems now that more and more I’m meeting people that believe. Doctors, designers, and researchers like Bryan Vartabedian, Susannah Fox, Peter Margolis, Michael Seid, Jesse Dylan, Bertalan Meskó, and Dominique Pahud just to name a few. I’ve found that you’ve gotta fly through that low fog of dismissal and doubt before you can really hit the high climb of positivity where you find people who get it.

One last thing I learned is that doing something to legitimately help people is contagious—especially when those people are really in need of help. Will Cole, whom I became good friends with when studying computer science at UC Berkeley, was so floored about Crohnology and its potential to help people that he quit his job at Microsoft to come and join me. We got backed by Rock Health and are now working out of the drop-dead gorgeous Berkeley Skydeck overlooking the San Francisco Bay.

The wave of the patient revolution is building. You, as a patient living right now in this time and space, have an amazing opportunity to be out on the front of that wave—to literally help shape the future of how we practice medicine.

Can you imagine a world where every patient is instantly connected every other? Where the treatments that work (whether eastern, western, or in between) surface from the collective intelligence of patients distributed throughout the globe? The causes, cures, and treatments we can discover from the symphony of patient experiences going on in real-time throughout the world, to me, is a mind blowing proposition.

I’d be floored if you could forward this blog post (or the the video above) on to anyone you know who has chronic condition or considers him or herself an empowered patient. Many thanks.

For more updates, follow Crohnology on Twitter and Facebook.

In other news: We’ve begun opening up the Crohnology alpha. Accepted patients should be getting invites on a rolling basis.

While speaking at FutureMed, Sean Ahrens explained his frustrations as a patient suffering from Crohn’s disease and his dissatisfaction with conventional treatments for the condition. To deal with the problem and to help others with Crohn’s or colitis, he created Crohnology, a patient-to-patient information sharing platform.

crohnology face Sean Ahrens at FutureMed: How Crohnology Is Fueling the Patient RevolutionAhrens explained how the platform fits into the broader context of the “patient revolution,” in which patients are becoming increasingly motivated to become active participants in their healthcare. This revolution is being fueled by mobile tools and social media, he said. And it is becoming necessary, as our healthcare system struggles to deal with rising cost pressures, an uptick in chronic conditions and as doctor–patient interaction becomes increasingly limited.

His Crohnology platform enables patients to share health and treatment information with each other, and to monitor the success of their treatments over time. This strategy enables patients to better deal with chronic conditions.

Many patients with chronic conditions such as Crohn’s have already turned into self experimenters. Ahrens himself fits into that mold, having intentionally infected himself with parasitic worms to see if they could help manage the disease. During his talk, he explained that he ordered a $3000 dose of the parasitic worms and created Crohnology, in part, to leave a “paper trail” to document the experiment.

Once the system was up and running, he used it to track his health over the course of an entire year and was able to gain a number of powerful insights from it. The system is even more powerful when it is opened up to a broader community of patients, he explained. “If we make better tools, we can make better conclusions.” The system can be used to collect many anecdotes from patients. After all, anecdotes are “data that we just haven’t scrubbed well yet,” he said.

Ahrens summarized his talk by saying: “The impact of these tools on health is going to be tantamount in degree to the overthrow that social media caused to traditional media.”

Anecdotal evidence in science is a controversial topic because data points are gathered in an ad hoc manner, and so they are difficult to combine into a proper study that points to definitive conclusions. Yet lots of useful information has been gathered this way over the centuries, and Sean Ahrens, someone we covered before, and who suffers from Crohn’s disease, founded Crohnology.com to help search for clues for this condition from a crowd of dispersed Crohn’s patients.

Source : http://crohnology.com/blog/12-believing-in-the-patient-revolution

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Combating Alarm Fatigue: Interview with Philips’ Chief Medical Information Officer, Joe Frassica

Combating Alarm Fatigue: Interview with Philips’ Chief Medical Information Officer, Joe Frassica

Combating Alarm Fatigue: Interview with Philips’ Chief Medical Information Officer, Joe Frassica

Anyone who has worked in a hospital knows that it can be a noisy place. Staff at a 15-bed unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital documented an average of 942 alarms each day – or 1 every 90 seconds (no wonder that their new high-tech hospital prioritized noise reduction to improve patient comfort). While some of these alarms are critical, many are false alarms or alarms to indicate the status of the machine itself and not the patient. Such over-stimulation can potentially lead to desensitization, a phenomenon known as “alarm fatigue.” It’s a workflow problem with dire consequences: alarm fatigue resulted in over 200 deaths nation-wide in the second half of the 2000s.

In order to learn more about the problem of alarm fatigue and what types of medical technology solutions are around the corner we spoke with the Dr. Joe Frassica, the Chief Medical Information Officer at Philips Healthcare.

Shiv Gaglani, Medgadget: What is alarm fatigue and why is it such a problem?

Joseph J. Frassica Combating Alarm Fatigue: Interview with Philips Chief Medical Information Officer, Joe FrassicaJoe Frassica, MD: In hospitals today, the medical device landscape can be noisy and disruptive. Alarms sounding from devices connected to patients are intended to alert clinicians of patients’ conditions that may or may not require immediate intervention.

Too many auditory alarm signals in the busy clinical environment not only contributes to staff interruption and patient/staff dissatisfaction, but can overwhelm clinicians and medical staff, leading to alarm fatigue. As a result of alarm fatigue, medical staff and clinicians dismiss alarms, turn them off or unintentionally ignore them, and therefore put patients’ safety at risk.

Alarm fatigue was cited in an ECRI Institute report in 2011 as the number one hazard faced by hospitals. The report said that in a hospital setting, the frequency of alarms poses a risk that some hospital staff becoming desensitized to the constant beeps and, in the worst cases, lowering the volume too much.

Alarm fatigue is a complex healthcare issue. Philips works alongside academics, clinicians, regulators and other manufacturers to develop solutions that reduce alarm-related adverse events.

Medgadget: How did you get interested in this problem, and what is your background in medical informatics/technology?

Frassica: Prior to joining Philips Healthcare as the Chief Medical Information Officer for its Patient Care and Clinical Informatics (PCCI) business, I served as Chief Medical Information Officer and clinical informatics leader for Miami’s Jackson Health System, a six-hospital public health system, along with its integrated health care delivery network. In addition to managing the clinical informatics direction for the Jackson hospital system, I was responsible for clinical oversight of the roll-out of a new core enterprise EMR with CPOE (Computerized Physician Order Entry), documentation, and decision support; implementation of system-wide PACS and Radiology Information Systems; and updates of the system’s best of breed Anesthesia Information System.

I currently serve on the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation’s (AAMI) Health Technology Safety Institute’s (HTSI) Alarm Management Committee. HTSI is a community of Healthcare leaders from industry, academia and clinical medicine that is dedicated to ensuring the safety of medical technology. My work at Philips and with AAMI/HTSI and my experience as a clinical informatics leader have all contributed to my drive to help improve the alarm management landscape.

Medgadget: Can you describe the MIMIC II Database and how it has provided insight into the problem of alarm fatigue?

Frassica: The MIMIC II research database (Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care) was created by obtaining data from a hospital’s ICU information systems, hospital archives and other external data sources.

The MIMIC II research database is notable for three factors: it is publicly and freely available; it encompasses a diverse and very large population of ICU patients; and it contains high temporal resolution data including lab results, electronic documentation, and bedside monitor trends and waveforms. The database can support a diverse range of analytic studies spanning clinical decision-rule improvement and electronic tool development, helping to target the causes of alarm fatigue and ultimately solving the issue.

Medgadget: What innovations has Philips implemented (or is currently working on) to address the problem of alarm fatigue?

Frassica: Philips has been involved in solving issues related to alarm fatigue since 1998, when it co-convened the first ISO TC121/SC3 – IEC SC62A Joint Working Group for Alarm Systems. The working group is made up of experts from academic, clinical and industry backgrounds who review and evaluate issues surrounding clinical alarms. Additionally, as I mentioned above, I joined the Association of Advancement of Medical Instrumentation’s Health Technology Safety Committee to help solve the issue of alarms management. AAMI plans to support the FDA and the Joint Commission on a strategic approach to this issue.

Since its convening of the first Joint Working Group for Alarm Systems, Philips has continued to work with academics, clinicians and manufacturers to develop solutions that integrate alarm systems to address the issue of alarm fatigue.

Designed for busy clinical environments, Philips’ alarm systems are helping hospitals achieve better patient outcomes, improve clinical workflows, increase patient and staff satisfaction and maintain a less hectic environment. Additionally, Philips provides advanced technology, consulting services, training and access to ongoing research, while playing an active role in the development of alarm standards.

Philips offers the following solutions to address the issue of alarm fatigue:

IntelliVue Information Center iX: supports hospital research on alarm management and sentinel events. The Alarm Audit Log allows hospitals to take a holistic view of alarm management and analyze alarm data in order to optimize alarm limits and reduce clinically non-actionable (aka “nuisance”) alarms. The information can also be used to understand the total volume of alarms from different rules and how those rules may interact with each other.

IntelliVue patient monitors’ clinical decision support tools: help clinicians spot subtle signs of patient deterioration sooner. Users can adapt their systems to fit their workflow, reduce auditory interruptions and support the delivery of optimal patient care.

Graphical decision support tools such as ST Map, Horizon Trends and Histograms: turn data into clinically relevant information. Data from multiple clinical parameters are integrated into one intuitive view, enabling clinicians to spot trends in a patient’s condition at one glance and without the interference of auditory alarm signals.

Philips IntelliSpace Event Management system: gathers clinical data from various patient monitoring devices, escalates the most critical and relevant patient information, and then delivers that information to a provider’s handheld device of choice for clinician response. This solution provides hospitals with a smarter and more efficient way to manage alarms.

Philips Healthcare Consulting: offers clinical process and technical expertise to improve alarm management and prevent alarm fatigue. Philips structures and streamlines alarm management capabilities to enhance health care providers’ people, process and technology management.

Medgadget: Do you have evidence that these innovations are working or will work?

Frassica: Although there is no current published research on Philips’ devices specifically, Philips has partnered with MIT and others focused on research in the alarm fatigue area. An NIH (NIBIB) funded research program is focused on developing advanced ICU patient monitoring and decision support systems that will improve the efficiency, accuracy and timeliness of clinical decision-making in critical care. This includes improving overall alarms in critical care. This program is also making the one of a kind clinical database available to the world, so others can contribute in this area as well.

source : http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/the_johns_hopkins_hospital/jhhhs.html

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GE’s New Cytell Image Cytometer for Speedy Cell Analysis with Small Footprint

GE’s New Cytell Image Cytometer for Speedy Cell Analysis with Small Footprint

GE’s New Cytell Image Cytometer for Speedy Cell Analysis with Small Footprint

Cytell Image Cytometer is your bench-top solution for immediate and rapid cell characterization. Designed as a ready-to-use instrument for cell health, phenotype, and antibody assays – Cytell is an innovation on your bench waiting to give you more.

More than just cell health data: Also get phenotypic measurements, cell surface marker data, and run antibody assays.

Use your own reagents: Cytell allows you to use the reagents of your choice.

More than just a single sample: Acquire data on up to eight samples at once in less than 2.5 minutes.

More results while you wait: With four channel detection and eight samples per run, and going from sample preparation to results in 15 to 20 minutes*, you can expect more from Cytell.

Cytell Image Cytometer introduces a new way of working that simplifies your work and increases productivity across your organization. By freeing up your specialized flow cytometers from routine analysis, Cytell gives you more than you expect just when you need it.

GE Annual Outlook Investor Meeting

Jeff Immelt, Chairman and CEO, will host our annual review of GE’s performance and business outlook.

microphones

GE 3rd Quarter 2012 Earnings Webcast

Jeff Immelt, Chairman and CEO – GE; Keith Sherin, Vice Chairman and CFO – GE; and Trevor Schauenberg, VP Investor Communications – GE will host a webcast to discuss 3rd quarter 2012 results.

Yesterday at the Experimental Biology 2012 conference in San Diego, GE Healthcare unveiled its new bentchtop Cytell Image Cytometer .

The device measures up to 32 cell parameters in eight samples at a time, providing results in less than two-and-a-half minutes.

From the product page:

More than just cell health data: Also get phenotypic measurements, cell surface marker data, and run antibody assays.

Use your own reagents: Cytell allows you to use the reagents of your choice.

More than just a single sample: Acquire data on up to eight samples at once in less than 2.5 minutes.

More results while you wait: With four channel detection and eight samples per run, and going from sample preparation to results in 15 to 20 minutes*, you can expect more from Cytell.

Source : http://www.gelifesciences.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/catalog/en/GELifeSciences-IN/brands/cytell

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