Posts Tagged ‘Iphone medical app’

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Cellnovo Launches World First Mobile-Connected Diabetes Management System

Cellnovo Launches World First Mobile-Connected Diabetes Management System

Having received European CE Mark approval in September, Cellnovo out of London, UK has launched its diabetes management system that looks like a smartphone system, but is actually an integrated glucometer, wirelessly connected insulin pump, activity monitor, and cell phone-based data transfer system to share readings with family and clinicians.cellnovo-diabetes-management-system

To kick off the release of the system, Cellnovo launched a usability trial involving type 1 diabetics whose doctors will be able to monitor their blood glucose levels in real time as they’re being measured.

Co-trialist, Dr Mark Evans of Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge, commented, “This technology represents a entirely new model for the management of diabetes and one that could be of direct and long-term financial benefit to the NHS. The effective management of diabetes requires masses of information. The more information we have, and the more rapidly we have it, the better job we can do of using our resources efficiently to prevent the devastating long-term complications of diabetes. The Cellnovo system is the world’s first both to automate and deliver instantly the information we need – a task achieved through the thoughtful and thorough integration of consumer technology, such as wireless and cellular, with medical sensor and precision pump technologies.”

Co-trialist, Professor Stephen Greene of the University of Dundee added, “The Cellnovo system provides us immediate access to the clinical status of all our patients on a single screen. With accurate and current information we can identify and address problems immediately that, otherwise, might go unnoticed for months, contributing to excess cost and potentially tragic patient complications. In this clinical trial we will be the first to explore these new opportunities in diabetes patient management and hope to uncover new ways to improve and extend care, optimise workflow and drive cost efficiencies.”

Cellnovo’s diabetes management system comprises an insulin pump that connects wirelessly to an intuitive ‘app-based’ touch-screen handset. The handset features an integral blood glucose monitor, an activity monitor and a mobile (GSM) data connection to a comprehensive web-based clinical management system.
Cellnovo patients will be able to track and manage their diabetes; securely sharing all clinical information through the web so that they, their doctors, nurses and family members can ensure sustained and effective diabetic control.

Principal Investigator of the Cellnovo usability trial, and world-leading authority on insulin pump therapy, Professor John Pickup of King’s College London School of Medicine, remarked, “This clinical trial is not just the world’s first with a mobile-connected insulin infusion system, it is also the first clinical trial in which the care team and patients can simultaneously observe and evaluate patient data in real-time, anywhere in the world.”

Co-trialist, Dr Mark Evans of Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge, commented, “This technology represents a entirely new model for the management of diabetes and one that could be of direct and long-term financial benefit to the NHS. The effective management of diabetes requires masses of information. The more information we have, and the more rapidly we have it, the better job we can do of using our resources efficiently to prevent the devastating long-term complications of diabetes. The Cellnovo system is the world’s first both to automate and deliver instantly the information we need – a task achieved through the thoughtful and thorough integration of consumer technology, such as wireless and cellular, with medical sensor and precision pump technologies.”

Co-trialist, Professor Stephen Greene of the University of Dundee added, “The Cellnovo system provides us immediate access to the clinical status of all our patients on a single screen. With accurate and current information we can identify and address problems immediately that, otherwise, might go unnoticed for months, contributing to excess cost and potentially tragic patient complications. In this clinical trial we will be the first to explore these new opportunities in diabetes patient management and hope to uncover new ways to improve and extend care, optimise workflow and drive cost efficiencies.”

William F. McKeon, Cellnovo Chief Executive Officer added, “The launch of the Cellnovo system marks a new era in medicine where mobile connectivity is routinely embedded in medical devices. We draw upon the convenience of mobile technology in so many aspects of our lives: email, photos, social networking and banking. It is now time that our most precious asset, our health, benefits from the real-time information flow that is made possible with an in-built mobile connection. We are moving into an era where our doctors will routinely detect health issues over the web, before they worsen; and where patients and family members have the peace of mind that dangerous and costly emergencies can be avoided as early signs are immediately spotted.”

“The Cellnovo usability trial will be conducted in ten of the leading diabetes centers across the UK and will involve 100 patients, both adults and children. Such scale is unprecedented for a trial of insulin infusion technology and its usability.” concluded Dr Reman McDonagh, Director of Clinical and Physician Relations for Cellnovo.

Type 1 diabetes is routinely managed with pump technology throughout much of Europe and North America where 20-25% of patients gain benefit from therapy that mimics the body’s normal production of insulin. Yet the UK lags behind, with 96% of patients having to rely on multiple daily injections. By introducing a unique system that uses cellular data and touch screen technology, Cellnovo aims to eliminate the barriers to adoption of insulin pump therapy; simplifying and reducing the workload for doctors and nurses, while also improving the quality of insight and diabetes management achieved by patients.

Type 1 diabetes affects 250,000 UK patients for whom the prospect of poor diabetic control can lead to blindness, nerve damage and death. Caring for diabetes accounts for 10% of the NHS budget, a significant proportion of which is focused on type 1, a growing challenge that affects 4% more UK patients each year. Type 1 diabetes can only be managed by the daily or constant administration of insulin, replacing the role of the pancreas that for these patients has become incapable of producing insulin, which is vital for the metabolism of carbohydrates.

Source:https://www.pressdispensary.co.uk/releases/c993326.html

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Cool Nano Loudspeakers Could Make for Better MRIs, Quantum Computers

Cool Nano Loudspeakers Could Make for Better MRIs, Quantum Computers

Researchers from Joint Quantum Institute (National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland, College Park), the Neils Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, and Harvard University have described a theoretical system that may allow the detection of very small electrical signals by utilizing laser light.nanoloudspeakers

The technology framework uses a nano scale mechanical membrane that vibrates in response to an electrical signal, with the frequency proportional to the signal strength. Shining a laser onto the membrane will let you measure the vibration frequency, identifying the nature of the original signal. Because these sensors can be very small and remain cool, it may be possible to reduce the size, energy requirements, and improve all sorts of characteristics of MRI machines when their superconducting magnets are no longer necessary.

From the study abstract:

We explore a method for laser cooling and optical detection of excitations in a room temperature LC electrical circuit. Our approach uses a nanomechanical oscillator as a transducer between optical and electronic excitations. An experimentally feasible system with the oscillator capacitively coupled to the LC and at the same time interacting with light via an optomechanical force is shown to provide strong electromechanical coupling. Conditions for improved sensitivity and quantum limited readout of electrical signals with such an “optical loud speaker” are outlined.

A team of physicists from the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), the Neils Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, and Harvard University has developed a theory describing how to both detect weak electrical signals and cool electrical circuits using light and something very like a nanosized loudspeaker.* If demonstrated through experiment, the work could have a tremendous impact on detection of low-power radio signals, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the developing field of quantum information science.

The JQI is a collaborative venture of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland, College Park.

“We envision coupling a nanomechanical membrane to an electrical circuit so that an electrical signal, even if exceedingly faint, will cause the membrane to quiver slightly as a function of the strength of that signal,” says JQI physicist Jake Taylor. “We can then bounce photons from a laser off that membrane and read the signal by measuring the modulation of the reflected light as it is shifted by the motion of the membrane. This leads to a change in the wavelength of the light.”

Present technology for measuring the wavelength of light is highly sensitive, which makes it ideal for detecting the nanoscopic motions of the loudspeaker caused by extremely faint electrical signals.

And the ability to detect extremely faint electrical signals may someday make MRI medical procedures much easier.

“MRI machines are so big because they are stuffed with really powerful superconducting magnets, but if we can reduce the strength of the signals we need for a reading, we can reduce the strength, and the size, of the magnets,” Taylor says. “This may mean that one could get an MRI while sitting quietly in a room and forgo the tube.”

The same setup could be used to generate information-carrying photons from one qubit to another, according to Taylor.

One popular quantum information system design uses light to transfer information among qubits, entangled particles that will exploit the inherent weirdness of quantum phenomena to perform certain calculations impossible for current computers. The ‘nanospeaker’ could be used to translate low-energy signals from a quantum processor to optical photons, where they can be detected and transmitted from one qubit to another.

Source:http://jqi.umd.edu/news/293-cool-nano-loudspeakers-could-make-for-better-mris-quantum-computers.html

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Implanted biofuel cell converts bug’s chemistry into electricity

Implanted biofuel cell converts bug’s chemistry into electricity

If we can harvest energy from within the body, we may spur the development of a new generation of implantable devices that can work as long as the patient is alive and not require bulky batteries, a typical stumbling block for biomedical engineers.  Researchers at Case Western Reserve University managed to generate electricity from naturally occurring chemicals within the abdomen of  the false death’s head cockroach.

The researchers envision sensor-enabled roaches to perform odd jobs, but we’re instinctively terrified of the possibility of roaches controlled externally by a real human.  We prefer to see this kind of technology powering an implantable defibrillator that doesn’t have to be changed every ten or so years.

From the announcement:

The key to converting the chemical energy is using enzymes in series at the anode.

The first enzyme breaks the sugar, trehalose, which a cockroach constantly produces from its food, into two simpler sugars, called monosaccharides. The second enzyme oxidizes the monosaccharides, releasing electrons.

The current flows as electrons are drawn to the cathode, where oxygen from air takes up the electrons and is reduced to water.

After testing the system using trehalose solutions, prototype electrodes were inserted in a blood sinus in the abdomen of a female cockroach, away from critical internal organs.

“Insects have an open circulatory system so the blood is not under much pressure,” Ritzmann explained. “So, unlike say a vertebrate, where if you pushed a probe into a vein or worse an artery (which is very high pressure) blood does not come out at any pressure. So, basically, this is really pretty benign. In fact, it is not unusual for the insect to right itself and walk or run away afterward.”

The researchers found the cockroaches suffered no long-term damage, which bodes well for long-term use.

To determine the output of the fuel cell, the group used an instrument called a potentiostat. Maximum power density reached nearly 100 microwatts per square centimeter at 0.2 volts. Maximum current density was about 450 microamps per square centimeter.

The study was five years in the making. Progress stalled for nearly a year due to difficulties with trehalase – the first enzyme used in the series.

Lee suggested they have the trehalase gene chemically synthesized to generate an expression plasmid, which is a DNA molecule separate from chromosomal DNA, to allow the production of large quantities of purified enzyme from Escherichia coli. “Michelle then began collecting enzyme that proved to have much higher specific activities than those obtained from commercial sources,” Lee said. “The new enzyme led to success.”

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Medtronic Announces 510(k) Clearance for the Aquamantys SBS 5.0 Sheathed Bipolar Sealer for Spine Surgery

Medtronic Announces 510(k) Clearance for the Aquamantys SBS 5.0 Sheathed Bipolar Sealer for Spine Surgery

Medtronic received FDA 510(k) clearance to market its Aquamantys SBS 5.0 Sheathed Bipolar Sealer for sealing soft tissue and epidural veins during spinal surgery.

The device delivers RF energy for cauterization and saline to keep the area clean and clear for easy access around sensitive tissue.

From the press release:

The SBS 5.0 Sheathed Bipolar Sealer gives spine surgeons the ability to optimize speed and continuity in surgical cases by providing hemostatic sealing capabilities for both incised soft tissue (e.g., cut muscle) and epidural veins with a single device. Like other devices in the Aquamantys line, the SBS 5.0 uses Transcollation® technology, a combination of radiofrequency energy and saline that has been shown to reduce blood loss and improve visualization when used during spine procedures. Reductions in blood loss during surgery have been linked to reduced blood transfusion rates and decreased surgical time.

“The SBS 5.0 is a great combination tool that will allow surgeons to treat cut muscle planes as well as compress and treat epidural veins with a single device,” said Dr. Paul Santiago, a surgeon at Washington University School of Medicine. “This will be particularly useful in cases like 1-2 level TLIFs/PLIFs in which you want the ability to address both of these needs but the economics can make using multiple devices difficult.”

MINNEAPOLIS – January 23, 2012 – Medtronic, Inc. (NYSE: MDT) announced today that it has received 510(k) clearance from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the Aquamantys® SBS 5.0 Sheathed Bipolar Sealer, a new addition to the spine portfolio of the company’s Advanced Energy business.

The SBS 5.0 Sheathed Bipolar Sealer gives spine surgeons the ability to optimize speed and continuity in surgical cases by providing hemostatic sealing capabilities for both incised soft tissue (e.g., cut muscle) and epidural veins with a single device. Like other devices in the Aquamantys line, the SBS 5.0 uses Transcollation® technology, a combination of radiofrequency energy and saline that has been shown to reduce blood loss and improve visualization when used during spine procedures. Reductions in blood loss during surgery have been linked to reduced blood transfusion rates and decreased surgical time.

“The SBS 5.0 is a great combination tool that will allow surgeons to treat cut muscle planes as well as compress and treat epidural veins with a single device,” said Dr. Paul Santiago, a surgeon at Washington University School of Medicine. “This will be particularly useful in cases like 1-2 level TLIFs/PLIFs in which you want the ability to address both of these needs but the economics can make using multiple devices difficult.”

“We are excited to offer surgeons this new addition to our ever-growing spine portfolio of advanced energy products,” said Mark Fletcher, President of the Surgical Technologies business at Medtronic, Inc. “The SBS 5.0 utilizes the effectiveness of our patented Transcollation technology in preventing and stopping bleeding during surgery, and it will deliver considerable value to surgeons, patients, and hospitals alike.”

Source:http://wwwp.medtronic.com/Newsroom/NewsReleaseDetails.do?itemId=1327328898338&lang=en_US

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Video Games Used in New Treatment that May Fix “Lazy Eye” in Older Children

Video Games Used in New Treatment that May Fix “Lazy Eye” in Older Children

A new study conducted in an eye clinic in India found that correction of amblyopia, also called “lazy eye,” can be achieved in many older children, if they stick to a regimen that includes playing video games along with standard amblyopia treatment. Today at the 115th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Dr. Somen Ghosh will report on the approaches that allowed about a third of his study participants, who were between 10 and 18 years old, to make significant vision gains.

By the end of the one year study, nearly 30 percent of the 100 participants achieved significant vision gains. About 60 percent showed at least some improvement. Significant gains were more likely in children who participated in Groups 3 or 4 of the four treatment regimens. Treatment Group 3 completed daily video game practice and Group 4 took the supplement citicoline, which is associated with improved brain function. Improvement was more likely in children younger than age 14 than in those 14 and older.

The prevailing wisdom has been that if amblyopia is not diagnosed and corrected before a child reaches school age, it is difficult or impossible to correct. But recently the United States-based Pediatric Eye Disease Investigation Group (PEDIG) reported significant vision gains in 27 percent of older children in a study funded by the National Eye Institute. This report motivated Dr. Ghosh to test new approaches to learn what might be particularly effective in this age group.

His study was divided into four treatment groups. Students in all groups followed a basic treatment plan that required them to wear eyeglasses that blocked the stronger eye for at least two hours a day, during which time they practiced exercises using the weaker eye. This “patching” technique is a standard amblyopia treatment that works by making the weaker eye work harder. Group one followed only the basic plan and served as the control group, while groups two, three and four received additional treatments:

  • Group 2 took a supplement that contained micronutrients considered important to good vision
  • Group 3 played at least one hour of video games daily using only the weaker eye
  • Group 4 took the supplement citicoline, which is associated with improved brain function

Saurav Sen, a 16 year old graduate of Dr. Ghosh’s clinic, received a second chance to achieve good vision. At age 13 Sen began to experience serious vision problems, which negatively impacted his school work. Other doctors had told him it was too late to correct his amblyopia. He completed the regimen assigned to treatment Group 3.t

“Playing the shooting games while using just my weaker eye was hard at first, but after a few months I could win all game levels easily,” said Sen. “I’m very happy that I stuck with the program. My vision has improved a lot, so that I now have no trouble studying or taking exams. My tennis game also improved, and of course I’m now a pro PC gamer.”

“The cooperation of the patient is very important, maybe even crucial, to successful treatment of amblyopia,” said Dr. Ghosh. “We should never give up on our patients, even the older children, but instead offer them hope and treatment designed to help them achieve better vision.”

Purpose:

  • To know the efficacy of treatment for amblyopia in an older age group.

Methods:

  • 100 patients were selected of an age group from 10 -18 years and divided into 4 groups: Group I: general protocol (GP), occlusion, orthoptic exercises; Group II: GP + antioxidant tablets; Group III: GP + stimulating video games (shooting games, car racing 2 hours/day); and Group IV: GP + Tab Citicoline 500 mg b.i.d. for 3 months, then tapering dose. Minimum follow-up period was 2 years

Results:

  • Visual acuity improvement of Group I (52%) and II (56%) were similar; Group III (64%) and IV (72%) showed better result. The improvement decreased with increasing age.

Conclusion:

With a proper management plan for amblyopia; improvement in visual acuity and binocular function for patients in an older age group can be achieved.

Video Games as New Treatment for Amblyopia in Older Children

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Man Gets Smartphone Dock Built Into Prosthetic Arm

Man Gets Smartphone Dock Built Into Prosthetic Arm

A British man has become the world’s first ever patient to have a smartphone docking system built into his prosthetic arm.

Trevor Prideaux, who was born without his left arm, used to have to balance the smartphone on his prosthetic arm or put it on a flat surface to use it.

But now Mr Prideaux, 50, can call and text his loved ones without moving the mobile, which is embedded into his fibreglass and laminate limb.

The catering manager sought help from medical experts and communications chiefs at Nokia to build the special prosthethic.

They carefully carved a phone shaped fibrecast cradle into the skin-coloured prototype, allowing his Nokia C7 to sit inside it.

Mr Prideaux, of Wedmore, Somerset, said: “I think this is the first time this has ever been done in the world – and it is brilliant.

“I can now take calls and make texts just by using my one hand, while the phone sits inside my arm.

“The phone slots smoothly and securely within my limb and is easily removable, when required. I think this would help a lot of people with prosthethic arms – especially those who were not born with the disability.

“People who have had motorbike crashes and soldiers who have lost limbs – they could all benefit from this.”

Mr Prideaux has worn a prosthetic limb since he was three years old after being born without a left forearm.

The father-of-one, who lives with his partner Amanda, has always had his limbs specially made at the Exeter Mobility Centre in Devon.

But since mobile phones – and in particular smartphones – became mainstream, the caterer found he struggled to text and make calls with one arm.

He said: “From owning a mobile phone and with the invention of the iPhone, it became clear that this piece of technology was not ideally suited to be used with only one hand.

“When testing an iPhone, with the thoughts of purchase, I had to balance it on my prosthetic limb to text.

“I wondered whether it was possible to have a mobile phone built into my limb, to aid usage.

“I was born without my arm so I am used to adapting to things – but I thought that others must be struggling too.”

Trevor contacted Apple to try and get hold of a blank iPhone casing to test it out, but he said the communications giant refused to co-operate.

He then put the idea to the back of his mind, before a trip to his local 02 shop to get an upgrade on his Nokia phone brought the plan back to life.

They agreed to help him and his technicians at the Exeter Mobility Centre got working on a ground-breaking limb.

Prosthethist Steve Gallichan, technician Les Street and undergraduate worker Sarah Bennett then produced a prototype in just five weeks.

They made a laminated fibre cast of the phone and built it into the limb, so Mr Prideaux’s mobile could fit inside.

He said: “This phone is slightly narrower than an iPhone and has both a qwerty and alphanumeric board, which is easier for me to use.

“My Nokia C7 sits within my forearm, between my stump socket and the single knob rotary that holds my limb attachments in place.

“Now when I get call I can either hold my arm up to my ear or put it on speaker phone. I can also take it out if I need to. Texting is also much easier and a lot safer.

“I am hugely grateful to the people EMC. This is a leap forward which has helped me out a lot and can also aid others.”

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MRI Guided Focused Ultrasound Shows Promise For Essential Tremor Treatment

MRI Guided Focused Ultrasound Shows Promise For Essential Tremor Treatment

Dr. Jeffrey Elias, Director of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery at University of Virginia, recently presented data at the Congress of Neurological Surgeons on preliminary results for a clinical trial using MR-guided focused ultrasound to treat Essential Tremors (ET), a condition affecting 10 million Americans. In the first 10 patients studied there was a reported 78% improvement in contralateral tremor scores in the hand.  Patients’ functional activities scores also greatly improved. The study uses MRI imaging to identify and pinpoint delivery of focused ultrasound to a particular area in the brain known as the thalamus.  If final results prove successful Dr. Elias anticipates a larger follow-up trial to study the overall safety and long-term efficacy of such a treatment modality.

MR-guided Focused Ultrasound blends the accuracy of MRI imaging and the technology of high intensity focused ultrasound to deliver energy with extreme precision to target tissue in the body as small as 1 mm in diameter.  Up to 1000 intersecting ultrasound beams can converge on a particular location in the body allowing for high intensity energy delivery.

Multiple companies manufacture the MR-guided Focused Ultrasound. This particular study was performed using the ExAblate Neuro by InSightec, Ltd.

Currently, MR-guided focused ultrasound is FDA-approved for treating uterine fibroids.  In Europe it is also approved for treating bone metastases.  Clinical trials are underway for the treatment of breast and brain cancer.

http://www.fusfoundation.org/Press-Releases/focused-ultrasound-shows-promise-as-a-noninvasive-deep-brain-treatment-for-essential-tremor-a-condition-that-affects-millions

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Verisante Aura™ Marks Milestone In Skin Cancer Detection

Verisante Aura™ Marks Milestone In Skin Cancer Detection

Verisante Aura™ is indicated for use for the evaluation of skin lesions that may be clinically suspicious for melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma and/or basal cell carcinoma when a medical professional chooses to obtain additional information to rule out one of the above conditions before making a final decision to biopsy.

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iMuscle shows you the best exercises for every muscle group

iMuscle shows you the best exercises for every muscle group

To work on a particular body area, zoom into that area on the 3-Dimensional Muscle Man. Then choose a muscle to work on - a thumbnail list of all the exercises associated with that muscle will be shown. Then press on one of these thumbnail exercises and you will be shown an animated...

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Blood Pressure Monitor Medical Software for iPad, iPhone and iPod touch

Blood Pressure Monitor Medical Software for iPad, iPhone and iPod touch

Withings Announces US Availability of its Connected Blood Pressure Monitor for iPad, iPhone and iPod touch

Withings combines sophisticated technology and design to transform an ordinary blood pressure monitor into an accurate health self-monitoring device

Paris, France – June 20, 2011– Today, French technology company Withings announced the US availability of its Blood Pressure Monitor (BPM) for iPad®, iPhone® and iPod touch®. This Withings BPM, including blood pressure cuff and companion Withings App, is a modern way to measure and record blood pressure readings in the personal and professional arenas.

With more than 25% of the world’s population* affected by hypertension, Withings has combined advanced technology and sophisticated design to create a medical device that is visually attractive, accurate and easy to use at home, in a professional setting or on the go.

Cédric Hutchings, Withings co-founder says, “Apple has revolutionized the smartphone and tablet market with both its design and functionality. We have strived to extend this revolution into the field of health and fitness by integrating our products to work seamlessly with Apple iOS devices.”

The Withings BPM is truly a plug-and-play solution for blood pressure measurement and tracking. Users simply wrap the blood pressure cuff around their arm and plug it directly into their iPad, iPhone or iPod touch using the incorporated cable. Once connected, the Withings App launches instantly on the iOS device and is ready to begin the measurement. When the reading is complete, the full results (Systole, Diastole and heart rate) are saved directly on the device, eliminating manual tracking.

A user’s stats can be accessed instantly from their iOS device or from their personal Withings webpage. Results are saved denoting dates and time of day for each reading, to help when comparing morning, afternoon and evening readings, and readings over time. Results can easily be shared by emailing results to a doctor and/or using the device’s automatic sharing feature to sync with popular personal health record sites like Google Health™ and Microsoft® HealthVault™ – virtually eliminating the gap between patient and doctor.

When used in conjunction with the Withings WiFi body scale, weight and blood pressure are tracked on the same graph within the app, giving users an at-a-glance health snapshot. Both products bring together in one place two vital pieces of your overall health, which is ideal when tracking trends and early warning signs of health problems.

Withings Blood Pressure Monitor Technical Specifications: (detailed specs)

Works with: iPad, iPad 2, iPhone, iPhone 3G, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPod touch 2nd
generation, iPod touch 3rd generation and iPod touch 4th generation
Measurement: Oscillometric Method
Measurement range: 0 to 285mmHg
Pulse: from 40 to 180 beats per minute
Cuff circumference: fits arm circumferences from 9″ to 17″
Pump: automatic inflation with air pump, controlled pressure release
FDA: device has received FDA clearance

The Withings Blood Pressure monitor works with iPad, iPhone and iPod touch. Starting today, the Withings Blood Pressure Monitor is available at www.withings.com for $129. The Withings App is available for free from the App Store on iPad, iPhone and iPod touch, or at www.iTunes.com/AppStore.

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